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intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
intro to literature
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intro to literature

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Lecture # 1 phil lit class

Lecture # 1 phil lit class

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  • The Bible or Sacred Writings Became the basis of Christianity
  • Koran The Muslim Bible
  • The Iliad and the Odyssey Source of myths and legends of greece, written by homer
  • The Mahabharata Longest epic of the world, contains history of the religions of India
  • Canterbury Tales Shows the religion and customs of the English in the early days, written by Chaucer
  • Uncle Tom’s Cabin Shows the sad fate of slaves, the basis of democracy, written by Harriet Beecher Stowe
  • The Divine Comedy Religion and customs of the early Italians, written by Dante
  • The Book of the Dead Cult of Osiris and the mythology and theology of Egypt
  • One Thousand and One Nights or the Arabian Nights From Arabia and Persia, shows the ways of government, or industries and of the society of the Arabs and the Persians
  • The word prose comes from the Latin prosa, meaning straightforward. This describes the type of writing that prose embodies, unadorned with obvious stylistic devices. Prose writing is usually adopted for the description of facts or the discussion of ideas. This means that can be used for newspapers , magazines , novels , encyclopedias , screenplays , philosophy , letters , essays , history , biography and many other writings. Prose generally lacks the formal structure of meter or rhyme that is often found in poetry . Although some works of prose may happen to contain traces of metrical structure or versification , a conscious blend of the two forms of literature is known as a prose poem . Similarly, poetry with less of the common rules and limitations of verse is known as free verse . Poetry is considered to be artificially developed, "The best words in the best order," whereas prose is thought to be less constructed and more reflective of ordinary speech. Pierre de Ronsard , the French poet said that his training as a poet had proved to him that prose and poetry were mortal enemies. The status of prose has changed throughout its history. Much of a society's early literature is written in the form of poetry. Prose was often restricted to mundane and everyday uses such as legal documents and yearly records. When a country's literature produced other forms such as philosophy or history these works expanded the realm of prose, but fiction does not often appear in prose until much later. Poetry is still often regarded as a higher form of literature to prose but the relatively late development of the novel offers competing and often superior examples of prose. Prose was at one time synonymous with dull, unimaginative or laboured writing and the word "prosaic" has developed from prose to mean anything boring. Now the word prose tends to be reserved for particularly well written pieces of literature and even limited to small sections of a larger work even though prose still also means any writing that is not poetry. Prose that aspires to the highest quality but in fact is too elaborate and overblown is called purple prose. Prose varies considerably depending on the purpose of the writing. As prose is often considered to be representative of the patterns of normal speech, many rhetorical devices are used in prose to emphasize points and enliven the writing. Prose which aims to be informative and accurate such as history or journalism usually strives to use the simplest language possible to express its points although this language often needs to get very advanced to describe a difficult issue. Facts are often repeated and reiterated in various ways so that they are understood by a reader but the excessive use of this technique can often make a serious piece of writing seem like a polemic . In fiction prose can flourish and take on many forms. A skilled author can alter how he uses prose throughout a book to suggest different moods and ideas. A thriller often consists of short sentences with "punch" made up of equally short words which suggests very rapid actions and heightens the effect of a very fast moving plot. Conversely, longer sentences are used to slow down the action of a novel and give a panoramic overview of scene. Prose can vary to tell a reader how they should feel about events in a story; fear, humour, uncertainty, or to tell the reader about a character's age, intelligence, opinions or personality although dialogue is often excluded from being thought of as prose. There are many techniques within fiction and the mark of a great author is perhaps their ability to manipulate prose and even invent their own unique prose style to effectively communicate what they wish to say. When a poem is translated from one language into another, particularly if it is an epic poem , the poem is often converted into prose. This is for two main reasons: not only does it allow the reader to understand the plot more easily but also the translator is considered to be exercising less unwelcome creative input if writing in prose. A translation should be an unchanged representation of the sense of the original but to impose the rhyme and meter structures of a different language is likely to significantly alter the poem. http://www.wordiq.com/definition/Prose
  • Transcript

    • 1. Introduction to Literature
    • 2. <ul><li>What is literature? </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 3. What is literature? <ul><li>a faithful reproduction of man’s manifold experiences blended into one’s harmonious expression </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 4. What is literature? <ul><li>deals with ideas, thoughts, and emotions of man coached in beautiful language </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 5. What is literature? <ul><li>expresses the feelings of people to society, to the government, to his surroundings, to his fellowmen, and to his Divine Creator </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 6. What is literature? <ul><li>written works which deal with themes of permanent and universal interest, characterized by creativeness and grace of expression </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 7. <ul><li>Why do we need to study Philippine literature? </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 8. Reasons: <ul><li>to better appreciate our literary heritage </li></ul><ul><li>to understand our great and noble traditions which can embrace other cultures </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 9. Reasons: <ul><li>to realize our literary limitations caused by certain historical factors </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 10. Reasons: <ul><li>to manifest our deep concern for our own literature </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 11. <ul><li>Literary compositions that have greatly influenced the world </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 12. Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 13. Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 14. Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 15. Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 16. Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 17. Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 18. Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 19. Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 20. Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 21. <ul><li>What are the criteria of good literature? </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 22. Criteria <ul><li>artistic quality </li></ul><ul><li>suggestiveness </li></ul><ul><li>permanence </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 23. <ul><li>Two major types of literature </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 24. Prose <ul><li>the ordinary form of written or spoken language, without rhyme or meter . </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 25. Poetry <ul><li>Literary work in which special intensity is given to the expression of feelings and ideas by the use of distinctive style and rhythm </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 26. <ul><li>Literary Genres </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 27. Fiction <ul><li>imaginative creation that is not a record of things as they actually happened </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 28. Non-fiction <ul><li>deals with real events and people; characters, actions, and settings are true. </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 29. Drama <ul><li>a story written to be acted out on a stage. </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 30. Poetry <ul><li>literature in metrical form. </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores
    • 31. References: <ul><li>http://www.thefreedictionary.com </li></ul><ul><li>htttp://www.wordiq.com/definition/Prose </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.yourdictionary.com </li></ul><ul><li>Kahayon, Alicia H. and Zulueta, Celia A. (2000). Philippine literature: through the years. Pasig City: National Book Store. </li></ul>Introduction to Literature Thelma V. Villaflores

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