Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Cipd 2008 Speaker Notes
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Cipd 2008 Speaker Notes

163
views

Published on

Speaker notes for the 2008 CIPD session

Speaker notes for the 2008 CIPD session


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
163
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. CIPD: Harnessing the Power of New Technologies  2008    Over the next few days (and let’s face it on a daily basis) you will hear how we are being shaped by  technological innovation. Processes are being streamlined, businesses made more efficient; traditional  barriers are being removed. The way that we live our lives as human beings is changing. And it can feel  quite overwhelming.  At Hodes, we conduct research all the time which emphasizes just how far this change is going. In the  example here, candidates state that they see the website as a reflection of the individuals they will be  working with. A scary thought for many of us.  But we are getting better at improving the web experience. Even with two disparate examples as these,  conventions in web design mean that the experience of interacting with a website and getting the  information you want is being made easier.   And even when there are contentious issues (such as the loss of control over a brand experience that  many organizations suffer when integrating with third party systems like applicant tracking systems) ,  innovation is reducing their impact.  BUT. This all assumes a linear process in recruitment: organisation needs to fill post; candidate needs  job; candidate visits website and sees job; candidate sends CV; organisation processes CV; candidate is  invited for interview etc. We are starting to see a shift in communication strategy towards the creation  of interactive (i.e. two‐way) experiences and it is in this context that technology is enabling  organisations to rethink the process of candidate acquisition. And we are starting to see a shift in the  way the recruitment process from one‐way push communications into ongoing conversations.  Take this first example: Social Media Marketing is a relatively new discipline whereby organizations  engage with candidates via chat and message boards; initial research from one of the leading  proponents of this discipline (Agency:2 ‐ http://www.agency2.co.uk/ ) indicates that SMM (as it is so  called) can be three times more effective than Pay Per Click. Impressive stuff.  We are also having to think about whether a website is needed at all; when Google has a monopoly on  candidate reach, it is very easy to use freely available tools to convey reams of information about a firm.  At Hodes, we are already using Google Events, Pinpoints, and Gadgets with some of our clients to serve  relevant local information to candidates at very low cost. The benefit to our clients is that we can give  them control over updating this information. No more long drawn out arguments with IT.  Even the attraction process is changing – the traditional approach of uploading a job to a job board  doesn’t really cater for attracting people who might fit your brief, but aren’t in the active job market. So  we are seeing campaigns that are developed around promoting the experiential aspect of working for a  company. The example here shows a Medical Recruitment website (http://www.medrecruit.com/) that  matches user’s lifestyle desires (for example if someone likes surfing and fine dining) with jobs.   The examples here (overleaf) show how organisations are using advertising to create an engaging and  interactive brand experience that tells a user just as much about an organization as any promotional  campaign could. Remember the initial research quote… 
  • 2. CIPD: Harnessing the Power of New Technologies  2008    What we are seeing is a shift in power from the organization to the candidate. Take LinkedIn, for  example (http://www.linkedin.com). The site analyses all the information that has been submitted by its  users to create a live window into companies. A candidate can find out basic (but useful information)  like the potential career path, the percentage make up of specific roles, gender split. But what is more  they can look at the CVs of people who have recently joined, or who have been promoted; they can see  what their friends and colleagues are saying about them. In short they can use modern tools to get a  very clear feel of the people they will be working with.  There are reams of research papers that show how online users trust peer to peer information more  than carefully scripted marketing speak. And while HR departments are arguing about whether they  should allow employees to access Facebook, or what the sign off process for Blogs should be, we are  seeing the rise of sites like Glassdoor (http://www.glassdoor.com), where employees can anonymously  submit any information they want. They can rate management, say how much they earn. RBS here gets  a rating of 3.5: nothing surprising. And the first quote from an employee? Well, disparaging as one might  expect. But you know what? There is just as much good, as bad and this is what candidates are looking  for; the ‘warts and all view’ of what they are getting into.  And these behaviours are being rewarded. Ever hear of Zubka (http://www.zubka.com)? This site takes  your internal Refer‐a‐Friend mechanic and goes one stage further. 3rd party recruiters are sharing the  commission they make, by rewarding successful recommendations. In the example here, I could get  £2.5K for successfully referring someone I know to fill a MacAfee post. Easy money. And don’t  underestimate the power of this in the current economic environment. Puts most Refer‐a‐Friend  schemes to shame, doesn’t it…  What we are seeing is a shift to a more fluid recruitment experience. And today we have seen numerous  examples that cover specific aspects of the recruitment funnel. But I want to leave you with a thought  (and it is something that has been echoed in press this week, for those who are interested.) We are  creating a nation of kids who live online – our jobseekers of tomorrow currently work and publish  schoolwork online, they research online, they trade online, they play online and they share their  experiences online. The net sum of their experiences is becoming virtual. And for those of you who feel  that I’m exaggerating the state of progress, here is an example of a site that is already catering for this  transition (www.virtualcv.com)   So, if the recruitment process is shifting to a low cost, just‐in‐time model, that matches the talent you  need with jobs you have available, how are you catering for this? And if you’re not, who is? It isn’t going  to be long before some smart cookie in their bedroom comes up with an algorithm that will enable a  firm to trawl the web to find the right candidate to match your needs. And I’m sure they will sell it at a  hefty price. So why are we waiting?  Feel overwhelmed? At Hodes, we believe that too many people allow technology to drive the brief, not  the other way around and we have a model that allows us to compartmentalise the issues we have  talked about today into manageable chunks. And while much of our work currently sits in the  optimization of web experiences, we are already seeing an increase in the first and last streams.  
  • 3. CIPD: Harnessing the Power of New Technologies  2008    I thought I’d share this with you, as our clients have found this a very useful tool for allocating, aligning  and prioritizing issues.   One final thought. I’m sure there will be a lot of talk today about digital natives and Gen Y. But this issue  affects everyone.  So I’d like us to open our eyes to a transformation that is social, not technological in  nature and start debating the real issues. Not gadgetry.   Thank you.  ahyatt@hodes.co.uk