The Good Agency_Integration Afternoon at the IoF 2010 convention

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Bringing campaigners and fundraisers together to acheive mutual goals and ultimately empower your supporters to act.

Speakers:

* Matthew Sherrington, Director, The Good Agency
* Roger Lawson, Strategy and Planning Director, The Good Agency
* Karen Rothwell, Director of Marketing, RSPB
* Cathy Anderson, Supporter Develeopment Director, Greenpeace
* Jonathan Smith, Head of UK Campaigning, Save the Children

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The Good Agency_Integration Afternoon at the IoF 2010 convention

  1. 1. Integration: What it Means Quest and Barriers Supporter Experiences Motivations and Values Emotions in Decision-making Influencing and Influencing and Social Psychology Social Psychology Opportunities Planning Toolkit Tools
  2. 2. Table Talk
  3. 3. Integrating Fundraising and Campaigning • Becoming a Campaigning Organisation? • Connecting Supporters to Mission? • Making a Difference
  4. 4. We are changing
  5. 5. And our supporters are changing Valley of Death! Dorothy Donor Susan Supporter
  6. 6. Integration: Why do it? • Brand re-positioning • Fundraising goals • Supporter acquisition • Public support to leverage advocacy • Consumer/public pressure on specific targets • Supporters want involvement
  7. 7. What Integration offers • Involvement and experience for supporters • Connection and loyalty (supporter retention) • People power (leverage for advocacy) • Brand focus and focused communications • Organisational catalyst • Improved ways of working • Fun
  8. 8. Transformational connection Low value High value Single product Multi products Transaction Relationship Aware Emotionally engaged Project responsive Brand loyal Supporter Ambassador Uninformed Informed Sceptical Trusting Activity Experience Moment Memory
  9. 9. What Integration looks like • Coherence: the story you will tell, consistently • Integrity: being true to yourself, and mission • Alignment: of activities, messages, opportunities • Coordination: prioritisation, decisions, planning • Integration is NOT everything, to everyone, all the time
  10. 10. What Integration requires • Supporter-focused philosophy • Planning and processes • Systems and discipline • Hard work • Leadership and decisions
  11. 11. But it’s difficult Leadership Managing data Definition of value Change Supporter insight Supporter vision management Ownership / Consistent Communication responsibilities procedures strategies Supporter care Integration with Shared objectives strategy branches Integrated Organisational Evaluation communications mindset
  12. 12. We think these are important
  13. 13. Does it work? Care2 stats from the US: • “Non-donors who take action online are 3.5 times more likely to donate than non-donors who get e-mail but haven’t taken action,” • Existing donors who take action online are 2.3 times more likely to donate than donors in the e-mail file who haven’t. “I feel like I can do a lot more when I am involved with them personally” “I just wanted to thank Lisa for her letter in which she provided a postcard and a petition with addressed envelope. She made it so easy for me to respond and I appreciate that. And she didn't ask for money at this time, either. Also appreciated, since I always send money when I can.”
  14. 14. People want experiences Good Insights
  15. 15. The Experience Economy: Customisation Commoditisation Source: The Progression of Economic Value The Experience Economy: Pine II and Gilmore, 1999
  16. 16. Premium Pricing £15.00 £12.50 £10.00 £7.50 £5.00 £2.50 £0.00 Source: The Price of Coffee Offerings Adapted from: The Experience Economy: Pine II and Gilmore, 1999
  17. 17. The shopping experience
  18. 18. The best?
  19. 19. The Starbucks Experience Principle 1: Principle 2: Make it your own Everything matters Principle 3: Principle 4: Surprise & delight Embrace resistance Principle 5: Leave your mark Source: The Starbucks Experience: Joseph A Michelli, 2007
  20. 20. What does it mean for us? Transactions Experiences
  21. 21. Our great opportunity? “Fundraisers will wake up to the fact that they are selling neither their organisations nor their causes, nor their missions and certainly not all the nuts and bolts and insignificant minutiae of what they do. Rather they are promoting joy, the warm glow, the exhilaration, the sense of achievement and fulfillment, even the meaning of life. As business life and political life are so discredited now, the timing for all this could not be better now.” Ken Burnett: http://www.kenburnett.com/Blog2020vision.html But fundraisers cannot do this alone. While the basic offer is, “If you give us money and we’ll sort out the problem” then we are missing the chance to engage the donor in the one thing that will really excite them – the chance to change the world.
  22. 22. • • • ! • " # • # #$
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  25. 25. , S O N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M Staff Members Public launch F2F GE advocacy Budget advocacy Devolveds
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  40. 40. Table Talk
  41. 41. Values and Motivations Good Insights
  42. 42. Why do people do anything? Self fulfilment needs Self Actualisation Personal growth and self fulfilment Aesthetic Needs Beauty / Know, understand, explore Self Esteem Achievement Esteem of others Recognition Psychological needs Belongingness / Love Friends / family Safety Security / freedom from fear Physiological Basic needs Food / Water / Shelter
  43. 43. Why do people give? Completeness Status Pride & Esteem Achievement Tribal Basic Emotional
  44. 44. More recent research Guilt 5% Donors Compassion 41% Belonging 20% Inspiration 34% Guilt 7% Donors who do more Compassion 22% Belonging 32% Inspiration 39%
  45. 45. Our values drive everything Sustenance Outer Inner
  46. 46. Values modes attributes Sustenance Discipline Acquiescence Driven Non-reflective Security Conformity Traditional Family Safety Material Wealth National Security Distracted Rules Power Complacent Luddism Showhome Indulgent Diet Wrong Clothes Distant Respected Convenience Propriety Insular Visible Success Asocial Skeptical Bargain Hunter Reserved Achievement Control Others Irresolute Impulsive Spender Looking Good Budget Bedlam Be Satisfied Busy Pleasure Good Time Romantic Love Tradition Visible Ability Money Casual Hedonism Socialist Persona Spiritualism Honesty Speculate Fun Passivity Bodily Ease WYSIWYG Sensitive Prudent Religious Solitary Modest Unease Tolerant Exhilaration Shrewd Price Conscious Coasting Adventure Stimulation Loyalty Car Casual Novelty Healthy Lifestyle Cheerful Inquisitive Constrained Spender Local Caring Benevolence Outer Sexual Awareness Artisan Beauty Ozone Friendly Global New Family Nature TV Casual Self-choice Non-acquisitive Directed Creativity Financial Morality Listening Unplanned Self-direction Self-efficacy Tao Equivalence Justice Boldness No Sweat Openness Independent Feeling Good Universalism Inner Directed Adaptable Equanimity Copyright Cultural Dynamics Strategy and Marketing Ltd 2009
  47. 47. The population is changing VALUES 50 45 40 irected Inner D PERCENTAGE 35 Outer Directed 30 25 Susten ance D riven 20 15 10 5 0 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 YEAR Copyright Cultural Dynamics Strategy and Marketing Ltd 2009
  48. 48. How does this affect us? * + , + % 40EA6 , ! 40@A6 98= 40>@6 "# 40@B6 9 40BA6 407>6 / % 40CB6 407B6 % 407E6 9 40BB6 " 400?6 % 400F6 # # 40>06 < 400F6 % 400C6 9 # 407?6 400@6 " 40076
  49. 49. What does this mean for you • Do you know why someone would support you? • Do people give to you for the same reasons they campaign for you? • Can you match your needs to their needs? And your values to their values?
  50. 50. Decision Making is Emotional Good Insights
  51. 51. Emotion is essential in decision making
  52. 52. Three brains in one
  53. 53. The extent is individual
  54. 54. Blink Thin slicing
  55. 55. Post-rationalisation
  56. 56. Two types of emotion Positive Negative Fear Happiness Anger Love Disgust Hope Sadness
  57. 57. Emotion in decision making Incidental Integral Expected Much less important The feelings that The feelings about Cognitive analysis you happen to have the specific issue / of these leads to at the time you need decision less post-decision to make a decision satisfaction Source: The role of emotions in foreign policy decision making, Renshon, J.B. & Lerner, J. S. Wilson et al, 1993
  58. 58. Do emotions evoke responses? Emotions that evoke responses Emotions that don’t evoke responses Disgust: Causes disengagement, Anger: Typically involves attempts to although it can trigger redress injustice attempts to cleanse oneself of offending objects / ideas Hope: Creates optimism which is important if encouraging risk Sadness: Causes disengagement, and taking sometimes efforts to change one’s circumstances Happiness: Happy people are most likely to help other people Contentment: Appraised with low effort and inactivity Source: Do positive and negative emotions have opposing influences on hope? Jennifer S Lerner and Deborah Small, 2002
  59. 59. What does this mean for us? Our emotions need to overcome Our emotions must create actions incidental emotions What emotion is Consistency right for you? Cause / Brand Issue Relationship Action What you Your want them to supporters do Their values, your needs Fundraising, campaigning and behaviour change are not about being rational
  60. 60. Fundraising skills are key to inspiring action • Reach = the right audience and channel • Relevance = connection to their world • Resonance = emotionally moving • Realism = confidence it makes a difference i.e. clear need, clear solution, a clear role for our supporters, clear ask for the task • Reward = thanks feedback, appreciation (before you start again ...)
  61. 61. Social psychology and public campaigning Influence and persuasion – the importance of the big six… • Reciprocation • Commitment and consistency • Scarcity • Liking • Authority • Social proof Influence – the psychology of persuasion Robert Cialdini
  62. 62. Herd • More on psychology to really freak out those who believe we are independent thinkers…. Herd Mark Earls
  63. 63. Social psychology and public campaigning – why Dove? • Reciprocation – We didn’t do this one (but I’ll come back to it later…) • Commitment and consistency – Initial easy action for our supporters against the Chair of the Round Table on sustainable Palm Oil • Scarcity – disappearing forest • Liking – Oang-utan (not Greenpeace!!), and their favorite brand good here too • Authority – 3-year investigation • Social proof – well this is where Flickr and the ad agencies came in…
  64. 64. Pyramid of involvement 1 9 90
  65. 65. http://groundwire.org/blog/groundwire-engagement-pyramid
  66. 66. Leading Owning Contributing Acting Observing
  67. 67. Leading Owning Contributing Acting Observing
  68. 68. Leading Owning Contributing Acting Observing
  69. 69. Leading Owning Contributing Acting Observing
  70. 70. Leading Owning Contributing Acting Observing
  71. 71. Leading Owning Contributing Acting Observing
  72. 72. Leading Owning Contributing Endorsing Acting Endorsing Observing
  73. 73. Leading Endorsing Owning Endorsing Contributing Endorsing Acting Endorsing Observing
  74. 74. Kit kat – the pyramid the ran away with itself! 1,300,000 people have viewed the Kitkat ad on YouTube
  75. 75. Kit kat – the pyramid the ran away with itself! 300,000 people have emailed Nestle 1,300,000 people have viewed the Kitkat ad on YouTube
  76. 76. Kit kat – the pyramid the ran away with itself! ~8,000 people stopped and had there first face-to-face conversation with Greenpeace and then wrote to Nestle 300,000 people have emailed Nestle 1,300,000 people have viewed the Kitkat ad on YouTube
  77. 77. Kit kat – the pyramid the ran away with itself! 10% of our appeal donors gave an extra gift to our palm oil appeal – in 10 days… ~8,000 people stopped and had there first face-to-face conversation with Greenpeace and then wrote to Nestle 300,000 people have emailed Nestle 1,300,000 people have viewed the Kitkat ad on YouTube
  78. 78. Kit kat – the pyramid the ran away with itself! ~1,000 people became Nestle ‘friends’ on Facebook 10% of our appeal donors gave an extra gift to our palm oil appeal – in 10 days… ~8,000 people stopped and had there first face-to-face conversation with Greenpeace and then wrote to Nestle 300,000 people have emailed Nestle 1,300,000 people have viewed the Kitkat ad on YouTube
  79. 79. Kit kat – the pyramid the ran away with itself! 750 people gave a gift to fund a press ad – 50% of them their first gift ~1,000 people became Nestle ‘friends’ on Facebook 10% of our appeal donors gave an extra gift to our palm oil appeal – in 10 days… ~8,000 people stopped and had there first face-to-face conversation with Greenpeace and then wrote to Nestle 300,000 people have emailed Nestle 1,300,000 people have viewed the Kitkat ad on YouTube
  80. 80. Kit kat – the pyramid the ran away with itself! 3 people ‘dropped’ in on their AGM 750 people gave a gift to fund a press ad – 50% of them their first gift ~1,000 people became Nestle ‘friends’ on Facebook 10% of our appeal donors gave an extra gift to our palm oil appeal – in 10 days… ~8,000 people stopped and had there first face-to-face conversation with Greenpeace and then wrote to Nestle 300,000 people have emailed Nestle 1,300,000 people have viewed the Kitkat ad on YouTube
  81. 81. A patchwork of involvement that was building a mighty pyramid 91,000 people became beneficial owners
  82. 82. A patchwork of involvement that was building a mighty pyramid Hundreds of people twinned with our orchard and allotment
  83. 83. A patchwork of involvement that was building a mighty pyramid Over 2,000 donors gave an extra gift to Airplot = £67,000 Just under 200 people took out a direct debit as a result of our thank you email to Airplot joiners 8% people of Airplotters contacted have started direct debits – so far!
  84. 84. Our vision was - unashamedly - here Physical block Legal block We won here Social block
  85. 85. A work in progress pyramid - bp >2,000,000 people have viewed the BP competition
  86. 86. A work in progress pyramid - bp All donors have been asked to join the competition, and we took out an ad >2,000,000 people have viewed the BP competition
  87. 87. A work in progress pyramid - bp Thousands of people have re-branded bp on our streets All donors have been asked to join the competition, and we took out an ad >2,000,000 people have viewed the BP competition
  88. 88. A work in progress pyramid - bp > 2,359 people have entered our competition Thousands of people have re-branded bp on our streets All donors have been asked to join the competition, and we took out an ad >2,000,000 people have viewed the BP competition
  89. 89. A work in progress pyramid - bp Just started to recruit on our homepage > 2,359 people have entered our competition Thousands of people have re-branded bp on our streets All donors have been asked to join the competition, and we took out an ad >2,000,000 people have viewed the BP competition
  90. 90. A work in progress pyramid – bp 2 people climbed bp’s headquarters 3 people interrupted bp’s National oil convention speech Just started to recruit on our homepage > 2,359 people have entered our competition Thousands of people have re-branded bp on our streets All donors have been asked to join the competition, and we took out an ad >2,000,000 people have viewed the BP competition
  91. 91. A work in progress pyramid – bp
  92. 92. Table Talk
  93. 93. Opportunities and Planning
  94. 94. Opportunities to Integrate Fundraising and Campaigns • External Quest • Internal Creativity Involvement • Planned activity • Opportunistic Valued
  95. 95. Communications Planning Brand narrative Communications Strategy Story Story Story Story Story Campaign Issue Issue Issue Issue Issue
  96. 96. Campaign Coordination - . / 0 / - - 0 % , 1 + 2*,2* 3 4,//% % ,23 * $ 0& $1+0 %% 5 20+$ 5 4,..$$)4 6 0", 2)4, ,1 6 6 4 $+ 40 *,1 6 6 4 7 4,1. * )02/% 4 6 4' 011$ % ) 2 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
  97. 97. Communications Prioritisation - . / 0 / - - 0 % , 1 + 2*,2* 3 4,//% % ,23 * $ 0& $1+0 %% 5 20+$ 5 4,..$$)4 6 0", 2)4, ,1 6 6 4 $+ 40 *,1 6 6 4 7 4,1. * )02/% 4 6 4' 011$ % ) 2 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
  98. 98. Activity Alignment - . / 0 / - - 0 % , 1 + 2*,2* 3 4,//% % ,23 * $ 0& $1+0 %% 5 20+$ 5 4,..$$)4 6 0", 2)4, ,1 6 6 4 $+ 40 *,1 6 6 4 7 4,1. * )02/% 4 6 4' 011$ % ) 2 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6
  99. 99. Greenpeace US Save the Whales
  100. 100. newsletter with supporter involvement
  101. 101. EveryChild Christmas appeal – Mail and e-mail
  102. 102. Integration with web and landing pages
  103. 103. ( # 22nd March Palm Oil Supporter Journey 2010 17th March , 29th March 17th March - ! " ' 1 17th March - 17th March $ % + ! " # ) " ( # ) * + !" *+ " # 17th March - 24th March - " " 17th March - " " # 31st March &# 17th March - - # 7th April ' " ) # , % $ % ' / 0 . # # $ , " '/ ) $ %, ' # & &' $ . # , $ % 27th March - *+ " # & # 12th /13th April ' P.T.O.
  104. 104. Palm Oil communications to potential GPUK supporters Key Ebulletin Web team Thank you Email action email 1 GPUK Direct marketing – recruitment activity website Direct marketing – development activity Intro email 2/ Press thank you inserts Campaign-led communication Google Adwords Active Supporters programme Paid-for Thank you E-mail and e-action follow-ups – new programme banner ads Email action email 2 Photo action Supporter-hosted banner ads SMS from press Get email Intro email ad details Mid-May follow-up email Mid-June follow-up email On-street leaflet Photo not taken Thank you but opted-in for info email 4 Thank you Email your Photo taken on street email 3 photo to company Thank you Thank you F2F fundraising teams will also be participating in the photo action work email 5 Email action email 6 Palm Oil communications to existing GPUK financial supporters Postal Email upgrade ask Postal upgrade Connect – Palm Oil reminder special ask Email action ask Postal cash ask Postal reminder Email cash ask Mid-May: follow-up email Mid-June: follow-up email
  105. 105. Integrated Campaigning Some Reflections Jonathan Smith Head of UK Campaigns Save the Children
  106. 106. Knit One Save One 124
  107. 107. What and Why Supporters knit hats for newborns and add a message label for the Prime minister • Poorest babies vulnerable to cold • Engage traditional fundraising supporters in: – Our new child survival campaign – Political campaigning • Show support for aid from ‘unusual suspects’ 125
  108. 108. How • Campaign Brand - Knit One Save One (March - Oct 2008) • DM / WoM - StC channels • PR - Paul O’Grady, Women’s Weekly, Sun, local and regional press • Political - PM hand-in and MP events (Westminster and constituency) • Follow up - ‘campaigning explained’ mail with further ask • Hats - Kenya, S Africa, Afghanistan, Mongolia, Tibet 126
  109. 109. What happened • 800,000 hats • 100,000 knitters • 40,000 messages to PM • 20,000 new campaigners + data • 2,800 second action cards • £500k equivalent PR • 50 MP’s actively involved • 10 constituency events • 1 PM quoted Save the Children campaign in speeches 127
  110. 110. So… • Start with your audience • Make it simple, emotional, creative and visual with tangible impact • Don’t get all ‘political’ with supporters, media or targets (well not all the time) • When people invest time they think • New approaches refresh old hands • Success brings challenges - messaging control, logistics, data, budget…. 128
  111. 111. GAZA CEASFIRE 129
  112. 112. Why • Israel launch massive air and ground attack on Gaza (late Dec 08 - early Jan 09) • ‘Response’ to Hamas rockets • ‘Like 1.5m people on Isle of White’ • 50% U16 • Hugely polarised media • Regardless of politics children in real danger 130
  113. 113. What and How • Public pressure for ceasefire • Build brand as ‘leading independent emergency responder’ • Provide action as an outlet • Place press ads on 10th & 11th Jan • Offer txt response + permission to contact • Support with traditional media work 131
  114. 114. What happened • Ads + back-end set up in 4 days • Guardian, Times, Independent, Telegraph • And then to our surprise… – 100,000 txt – Extensive digital media pick up – 83,000 ‘pass to friend’ follow up txt – PM personally tracking response and using in negotiations 132
  115. 115. Taking it further • Huge pool of new contacts • No email or postal data • Took risk on follow up calling • 100k calls • 8,960 new regular givers – High average annual donation • Campaign ROI of 1.4 – Over 1, including initial media costs 133
  116. 116. And for campaigning… Great first phase but limited opportunity for follow up… – Gaza not a long term policy or lobbying priority – Hard to build journey as very issue specific group – Limited resources for any campaign follows ups where no email captured 134
  117. 117. So… • High profile moments drive response and longer term value, if you can catch them right – Be flexible and quick off the mark – Offer a specific, tangible first ask, with a clear purpose – Build with relevant second asks and feedback – Integrate campaigning and fundraising • BUT….sustainable public campaigning needs a longer term integrated policy and political strategy 135
  118. 118. ROBIN HOOD TAX 136
  119. 119. Why and What Financial crisis shows how global financial markets make vast profit at public’s expense and hurt poor • Bonuses continue after bail out and turn down • Unique moment of political and public opportunity • Campaign for Global Financial Markets to pay: – full cost of their part in crisis – fair share towards global public goods like health, education and climate change 137 – tiny transaction tax = $20bn in revenue for UK alone
  120. 120. How • Reframe for our times… a tiny tax on bankers to make a massive difference… good…fair… workable… common sense… • Not naïve, ranty, complicated, bad or a cost you… • Serious heart - political and policy • Strong popular identity – visual, simple, flexible, shareable, embodying idea • Broad ‘lite’ coalition - focused, shared interest at moment in time • Channel anger - debate, sharing, action, creativity 138
  121. 121. What happened • Richard Curtis develops Robin Hood Tax brand • 100 + organisations sign up • 190,000 on facebook • Top trending tweet • 47,000 sign ups • 20,000 actions • Going global • ‘Robin Hood Tax’ widely used term • Extensive coverage as ‘serious’ and ‘viable’ option • IMF support tax on financial markets • Sarkozy, Merkel, Osborne, Obama accept banks must pay fair share for mess • Battle is now on the type of tax and how much! 139
  122. 122. So… • Never waste a good crisis - opportunity, alignment, energy, engagement, emergent activity • Make it simple, visual, shareable, timely emotionally resonant (and work with a brilliant communicator) • BUT ensure it goes deep • Mix ‘voices’ and ‘tones’ • Let it out there and ride the waves • Be reactive and flexible when needed • Plan in phases • keep an eye on horizon 140
  123. 123. Thank you for listening j.smith@savethechildren.org.uk
  124. 124. Forest Law Argentina Create pressure over the Senators to make them approve the Forest Law. To create real pressure into the Senate we will have to ask for 1 million votes (hopefully getting 5 thousand hundred).
  125. 125. Emailing appeals cycle If voted If opened the email Vote Forward to your contacts Print the chart and make people sign If didn’t vote If didn’t opened
  126. 126. Channels • Emails • Newsletters • Appeals • Video • Face-to-face • Press And if you have a lot of money… • Mail • Telephone
  127. 127. Propositions… we need you because… • We need people in key constituencies • We need as many people as possible • We have a target membership that will be powerful because • The company we are targeting cares what you think about their brand • If even a small number write to their MP… • We know you care about this issue because you gave to it last year
  128. 128. Asks • ‘View’ • Poll • Petition • Lobby Share… • Create • Join And lead…
  129. 129. Assets • E-assets are cool!! – Killer logo – Photographs on Flickr – Videos on Youtube – Upload of logo re-design – A place to put ‘real life’ work – I’m an Airplotter • Real assets are cool too – T-shirts – Badges – Stickers
  130. 130. • G0 • 000*AAA = • BAH 4 # 6 • >AH = #4 6 • 7 @H *CAH 8 I • G?*CAA G0@*AAA • J = >A*AAA 0CH * 07AA
  131. 131. J# ! 9 ,9 K " %3 + 9 J 3 %< L9 /3 • - # • - • - ! • - – * # * # # * • , * * 4 ! # 6
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  133. 133. % 3 ,/ J 3 %< ' 9 • +# - ! • + M * ,8
  134. 134. % • :L • ' • ' • < ! • • • N •
  135. 135. Emailing campaign summary Percentage of Internet users that voted 9.4% Number voting >1,100,000 New cyberactivists >750,000 Approached by email ~600,000 Response rate ~1% Conversion to regular giving in 2007 ~6,000 Approached for regular gift by telephone 170,000 Response rate 9.65% Conversion to regular giving in 2007 ~16,500 Total conversion in 2007 23,647
  136. 136. $1 at cost order = main cell • 111,000 e-mail test • 40% open rate (double best appeal) • 30% click-thru (triple best appeal) • 2.6% orders, 50% with extra donations; • $9,500 sales and$16,000 income Free-sticker = test cell • 30,000 generated • 15% with donations • 1200 new donors
  137. 137. Table Talk

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