Integration Afternoon (4 of 7) Emotional decision making 06 july 2010
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Integration Afternoon (4 of 7) Emotional decision making 06 july 2010

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Good Insights by Roger Lawson, Strategy and Planning Director, The Good Agency

Good Insights by Roger Lawson, Strategy and Planning Director, The Good Agency

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  • Fundraising skills, and especially direct response are very useful for campaigning, for example: The right audience Connection Case for support Clear ask with clear need, and a clear role for our supporters Appropriate ask for the task Thanks, feedback, appreciation We do all these things (almost!) subconciously. But, they are not obvious to others, and so it’s important to think about our internal audience here and how they look at this approach…
  • However, do those ways of working ‘fit’ with an area that is used to lobbying, and debating, especially in the UK political sphere. Here, speaking out, being different, the ‘truth’ are all key drivers, and in my experience marketing can be seen as ‘manipulative’, even superficial to the deeply political nature of campaigning. Instead, I tend to look behind what fundraisers do and think about what social psychology drives this way of working. This helps people who are new to response-driven work and can help to establish the theory behind what we do. Actually, I’ve found it improves what I do too!
  • For those of you who really want to think about social psychology, this book is amazing. It explains why we all make decisions on an emotional basis and how to get under people’s skin. In fact this book helped us with one of our most successful campaigns in the last five years.. Unilever
  • However, do those ways of working ‘fit’ with an area that is used to lobbying, and debating, especially in the UK political sphere. Here, speaking out, being different, the ‘truth’ are all key drivers, and in my experience marketing can be seen as ‘manipulative’, even superficial to the deeply political nature of campaigning. Instead, I tend to look behind what fundraisers do and think about what social psychology drives this way of working. This helps people who are new to response-driven work and can help to establish the theory behind what we do. Actually, I’ve found it improves what I do too!
  • We’d already had a head’s up from some ‘friends’ in the advertising world that the jewel in Unilever’s crown was Dove. Worked on pro bono by a top advertising executive, we produced ads that we knew would ‘upset’ Unilever. There were paid for by a major donor.
  • Out International office commissioned a film that got more views than Unliever’s equivalent – theirs is on 800,000+. We’re on 1,200,000+

Transcript

  • 1. Decision Making is Emotional Good Insights
  • 2. Emotion is essential in decision making
  • 3. Three brains in one
  • 4. The extent is individual
  • 5. Blink Thin slicing
  • 6. Post-rationalisation
  • 7. Two types of emotion Positive Negative Happiness Love Hope Fear Anger Disgust Sadness
  • 8. Emotion in decision making Incidental Integral The feelings that you happen to have at the time you need to make a decision The feelings about the specific issue / decision Expected Much less important Cognitive analysis of these leads to less post-decision satisfaction Source: The role of emotions in foreign policy decision making, Renshon, J.B. & Lerner, J. S. Wilson et al, 1993
  • 9. Do emotions evoke responses? Emotions that evoke responses Emotions that don’t evoke responses Anger: Typically involves attempts to redress injustice Hope: Creates optimism which is important if encouraging risk taking Happiness: Happy people are most likely to help other people Disgust: Causes disengagement, although it can trigger attempts to cleanse oneself of offending objects / ideas Sadness: Causes disengagement, and sometimes efforts to change one’s circumstances Contentment: Appraised with low effort and inactivity Source: Do positive and negative emotions have opposing influences on hope? Jennifer S Lerner and Deborah Small, 2002
  • 10. What does this mean for us? Fundraising, campaigning and behaviour change are not about being rational Relationship Action Consistency Their values, your needs Cause / Issue Your supporters What you want them to do Brand Our emotions must create actions What emotion is right for you? Our emotions need to overcome incidental emotions
  • 11.  
  • 12. Fundraising skills are key to inspiring action
    • Reach = the right audience and channel
    • Relevance = connection to their world
    • Resonance = emotionally moving
    • Realism = confidence it makes a difference
      • i.e. clear need, clear solution, a clear role for our supporters, clear ask for the task
    • Reward = thanks feedback, appreciation (before you start again ...)
  • 13. Social psychology and public campaigning
    • Influence and persuasion – the importance of the big six…
    • Reciprocation
    • Commitment and consistency
    • Scarcity
    • Liking
    • Authority
    • Social proof
    Influence – the psychology of persuasion Robert Cialdini
  • 14. Herd
    • More on psychology to really freak out those who believe we are independent thinkers….
    Herd Mark Earls
  • 15.  
  • 16. Social psychology and public campaigning – why Dove?
    • Reciprocation – We didn’t do this one (but I’ll come back to it later…)
    • Commitment and consistency – Initial easy action for our supporters against the Chair of the Round Table on sustainable Palm Oil
    • Scarcity – disappearing forest
    • Liking – Oang-utan (not Greenpeace!!), and their favorite brand good here too
    • Authority – 3-year investigation
    • Social proof – well this is where Flickr and the ad agencies came in…
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