Future Present - Nicky Hockly

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Conference plenary.
Abstract: Futuristic technology is not just the provenance of Hollywood movies. In many ways, the future is already present and here with us today. We will examine how futuristic technologies such as robots, haptics, wearable technology and more are becoming a part of our daily lives. Most importantly, we examine what this might mean for language teachers both now and in the future.

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  • Do you know this movie?
    Elysium – elEEEsium (2013), Director Neil Blomkamp
  • Utopia / dystopia with technology
    Played out in popular culture and esp through Hollywood movies –Elysium directly juxtaposes the two
  • Add Elysium trailer
  • 4 fairly well known Hollywood movies about futuristic technologies – largely in a dystopian world. Do you know them?
    (clockwise): Avatar, Elysium, iRobot, Minority Report.
  • Btw, not a coincidence that these tech map onto present reality. Hollywood directors routinely have a highly skilled tech team to advice on the tech showcased. Minority report had MIT team with dough to come up with any farfetched thing they liked and to try to make it real/work.
    Also – this quote sums up well how the future is fashioned. William Gibson is a sci-fi writer, invented term (and predicted) ‘cyberspace’. He also talks about a ‘drone-heavy future’ and the surveillance state
  • Faced with all these msgs about technology and the future in popular culture (movies, ads…), no wonder teachers are often fearful of the future, and what tech might mean for them and their professions. Typical feelings I find in my f2f training are feelings of fear, not being able to keep up, being replaced by technology, tech being ‘bad’ for humans and esp kids…
    BUT, funnily enough many of these futuristic tech are already here and being used in education, They are not as scary as they may seem Let’s look at 4 of them…
  • Let’s look at 4 of them and how they are being used.
    Avatar – a virtual projection of the self / an online self or character, in a virtual world
  • Let’s look at 4 of them and how they are being used.
    Wearable technology (or ‘tech togs’) ie technology that you can physically wear on your body
  • Let’s look at 4 of them and how they are being used.
    Haptics – allows you to physically manipulate virtual objects with your body (not just a mouse) and it gives you a physical sensation eg lifting up a heavy virtual object feels heavy
    (Note- it’s not the same as the Kinect= motion detection)
  • Let’s look at 4 of them and how they are being used.
    Robots – a fast developing field (read Turkle – ‘Alone Together’ on robotics from a pyschologist’s perspective)
    Some of this tech is free, some are expensive. Some are used in contexts only with a lot of resources; some in developing countries with very few resources.
  • SO – let’s see what’s happening in teaching and learning with these technologies.
    Avatar – a virtual projection of the self / an online self or character
  • First ‘avatars’ and virtual worlds
    Second life has been around for years, but steep learning curve. Language lessons, and other disciplines (science, biology, IT, languages…)
    TT Class with Carol Rainbow: This photo is with language teachers, teaching them how to teach in SL.
    Other typical sites: Club Penguin (VYLs), Habbo (teens)…and the latest craze… - next slide…
  • Simpler avatars also compelling (eg Moshi monsters – you adopt a monster and look after it, so not exactly an avatar, but it’s a virtual world). Use with YLs over time for basic vocab etc- see Graham and Kyle’s Digital Play for activity, and also their blog post: http://www.digitalplay.info/blog/2011/10/16/meet-moshi-monsters-the-primary-class-virtual-pets/
    Other typical sites: Club Penguin (VYLs), Habbo (teens)…and lately Minecraft (a basic survival game) – next slide
  • Minecraft is the latest craze – you build your own world and survive in it (the zombies come out at night)
    Now even an edu version of Minecraft to buy: http://minecraftedu.com/page/
    Some examples of Minecraft being used in education: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/09/15/minecraft-an-obsession-and-an-educational-tool/?_r=0
    Also: http://www.edutopia.org/blog/minecraft-in-classroom-andrew-miller
  • Next:
    Wearable technology (or ‘tech togs’ :-) ie technology that you can physically wear on your body
  • Eg latest wave of wearable tech are smartwatches that read your blood pressure or blood sugar levels, etc.
    Pebble was funded via crowd sourcing – selling for 150 US$. Connects via blue tooth with your smartphone and has much of the same functionality (see promo video on Pebble website)
  • We all know Google glass, which recently had the plug pulled – BECAUSE OF PRIVACY CONCERNS. Teacher have used Google Glass in ELT (eg Silvia Rosenthal Tolisano’s Langwitches blog – see http://langwitches.org/blog/2014/03/24/google-glass-digital-citizenship-what-do-the-kids-think/ BUT Glass has touched a nerve about surveillance – reflected in William Gibson’s sci-fi latest novel (The Peripheral 2014), and also be educators
  • NEXT:
    Haptics – allows you to physically manipulate virtual objects with your body (not just a mouse) and it gives you a physical sensation eg lifting up a heavy virtual object feels heavy.
    This scene with Tom Cruise is one of the ‘tech future’ scenes everyone remembers with him moving virtual stuff around, and it was a very new concept when the film was made (2002).
  • SHOW VIDEO. Haptics sometimes needs you to wear a special cyber glove – video explains how this works http://youtu.be/iS0EE7DZeO4
    In this video you can see how it can be used for learning physical tasks, such as dismantling an engine.
    Haptics has potential in vocational education eg mechanics (as per video), or surgery
  • Haptics video
  • NEXT: Robots
    This one goes straight to the fear that Ts will be replaced by robots - or automatic / adaptive elearning, a sort of ‘robotic’ system. But there really are robots being used in language teaching already – next slide
  • South Korea robot ‘Engkey’– Ts being beamed in via videoconferencing. The kids look at bit non-plussed, and the beamed-in T is not Korean (or Philipino).
    There was a lot of hype when the news broke in late 2010 – idea was to have one in every Korean kindergarten by 2013 and every Korean school by 2018, but this seems to have dropped out of the news, and I couldn’t find if this ever happened.
    Note though that this is NOT a robot teaching- It’s a vehicle for a live T via videoconf. But the hype is testimony to the whole iRobot fear of the robots taking over, encouraged by popular culture
  • Somewhere this seems to working quite well – ie live T via vc (minus the robot) - is with Plan Ceibal en Inglés in Uruguay. Briefly explain how this works.
  • Rocketship Elementary Schools. See also Carpe Diem
  • SO – we see that the future is in many ways present already
    Are we/Will we be in a Utopia / dystopia with technology in education? Where will we end up? Technology companies and evangelists suggest utopia (use iPads in your teaching and everything will be perfect). Hardly.
    Clearly neither utopia or dystopia– these are Hollywood/popular culture constructs and real life is never so tidy.
    It’s NOT about the technology at all. It’s about the teaching and the learning. At the end of the day it depends on what WE DO with these tools – they can be used effectively for learning, or less effectively. So can a pen, a blackboard or a notebook.
    All of the examples iv’e shown are mainly specific and localized – key top success is st & T interaction.
    BUT there are plenty of critical voices in edtech, esp with the current move toward big data, and edtech as Big Business. Let’s listen briefly to some of them
  • Jim Dator is a Professor at the Hawaii Research Center for Futures Studies, Department of Political Science, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu (www.futures.hawaii.edu).

    See Dator's article http://www.unescobkk.org/education/ict/online-resources/databases/ict-in-education-database/item/article/education-fit-for-the-futures/
  • Jim Dator is a Professor at the Hawaii Research Center for Futures Studies, Department of Political Science, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu (www.futures.hawaii.edu).

    See Dator's article http://www.unescobkk.org/education/ict/online-resources/databases/ict-in-education-database/item/article/education-fit-for-the-futures/

    Education fit for the futures
    21.02.2014
    By Jim Dator, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu

    The purpose of education is unchanging and universal: to help learners live successfully according to the norms, requirements, and possibilities of the societies in which the learners will spend their lives.

    While the purpose is unchanging and universal, societies change, sometimes very rapidly and drastically, and societies differ considerably from one another at any point in time. What might be a valuable skill or attitude at one time might become unnecessary or dysfunctional at a later time. Thus educational forms and substance change—or should change--in order to enable learners to be successful in new and changing societies. Indeed, ideally, educational institutions should guide and lead the changes of societies, but in fact seldom do.

    The modern university might be an exception. In contrast to the traditional, largely religious-based, universities of the past, the modern university was specifically created in the first third of the 19th Century with one primary purpose: to help transform agricultural polities into industrial nation-states by turning peasants into workers and soldiers, and nobles into managers and generals. For over one hundred years, the future was clear for every nation, and for all modern parts of every nation, especially education, almost everywhere in the world: to “progress” and “develop” in order to promote, obtain, and perpetuate continued economic growth. All other purposes of universities—including the promise of upward mobility of graduates—were either subordinate to or part of that overarching goal of enabling faculty and graduates to acquire the attitudes, learn the skills, and invent and diffuse the technologies necessary to obtain and sustain the continued economic growth of their nation.

    Since the early 1960s and 70s, as some nations were shifting from being “industrial societies” towards being “information societies” (ICT of course plays a huge role in that change), universities (and all national educational programs) have struggled to deal with the differences and indeed conflicts between education suitable for one or the other. Few if any universities have fully transitioned to focusing on the skills and ideas necessary for information societies, and of course in many parts of the world nations have not yet fully made the transition to industrialism, such less to informationalism.

    Nonetheless, a survey of the long-range plans and policies of many universities in many parts of the world made it clear that almost none of them envision any other future for themselves and their graduates than continued (or renewed) economic growth.

    And yet it is also clear to me from my experience for over forty years as Director of the Hawaii Research Center for Futures Studies within the Department of Political Science of the University of Hawaii at Manoa, in Honolulu, Hawaii, that continued economic growth is only one possible future of the world and all parts of it. It is not even “the most likely” future. Rather, it is one among several “alternative futures.” Educators need to survey the literature supporting the profoundly different images of the futures before committing to any long-range plan and the policies facilitating it.

    It is absolutely essential to determine first what the futures of society generally might be before deciding what the futures of education should be. Few if any educational institutions do this.

    While the number of competing images of the future is vast, our research has shown that each image is a specific example of one of four, “generic” images of the future. We label the four Grow, Collapse, Discipline, and Transform.

    Grow is the widespread, nearly official view of global continued economic growth, mentioned above.

    But more and more people are worried about the viability of such a future. Many very serious and plausible arguments are being made that the 200+ years era of continued economic growth is over. Energy, environmental, economic, and governmental insufficiencies or failures may be pulling it down. While many people bemoan (or deny) this possibility, others affirm and even welcome it.

    Largely in hopes of forestalling collapse, there have been many calls in recent decades for sustainability, self-sufficiency, and harmony. We label that image of the future “Discipline”—the belief that nations and communities need to stop the mad and unsustainable pursuit of mindless growth, and return to or create values and institutions that allow us to live lives of meaning and contentment based on personal and local self-reliance, environmental and social sustainability, and an overall sense of “enoughness”, instead of reeling from endless innovation and precarious change.

    Others—though their numbers are few, their arguments are powerful—give evidence that shows that indeed continued economic growth is over, that collapse is avoidable, and that discipline, as defined, unnecessary. Rather, accelerating and merging electronic, biological, nano- and space-based technologies, among others--are pushing all societies into a world as novel, unpredictable, and surprising as is the transformation of a caterpillar into a butterfly for those who have never seen or heard of that metamorphosis. Humans seem to be creating their own artificially-intelligent successors, while environmental pressures on Earth as well the new environments of Mars and elsewhere will mold new species out of old homosapiens, sapiens as the Holocene Epoch morphs more fully into the Anthropocene Epoch.

    From our years of work in futures studies we firmly believe that “futures of education” should never be undertaken until the alternative futures of the societies in which future graduates will live have been identified. Then, after a careful consideration and evaluation of the full array of alternatives has been made, plans, policies, and actions that will make educational institutions robust over ALL futures (rather than only one, mistakenly assumed to be “the most likely”) should be undertaken.
  • Jim Dator is a Professor at the Hawaii Research Center for Futures Studies, Department of Political Science, at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu (www.futures.hawaii.edu).

    See Dator's article http://www.unescobkk.org/education/ict/online-resources/databases/ict-in-education-database/item/article/education-fit-for-the-futures/

    Education fit for the futures
    21.02.2014
    By Jim Dator, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu

    The purpose of education is unchanging and universal: to help learners live successfully according to the norms, requirements, and possibilities of the societies in which the learners will spend their lives.

    While the purpose is unchanging and universal, societies change, sometimes very rapidly and drastically, and societies differ considerably from one another at any point in time. What might be a valuable skill or attitude at one time might become unnecessary or dysfunctional at a later time. Thus educational forms and substance change—or should change--in order to enable learners to be successful in new and changing societies. Indeed, ideally, educational institutions should guide and lead the changes of societies, but in fact seldom do.

    The modern university might be an exception. In contrast to the traditional, largely religious-based, universities of the past, the modern university was specifically created in the first third of the 19th Century with one primary purpose: to help transform agricultural polities into industrial nation-states by turning peasants into workers and soldiers, and nobles into managers and generals. For over one hundred years, the future was clear for every nation, and for all modern parts of every nation, especially education, almost everywhere in the world: to “progress” and “develop” in order to promote, obtain, and perpetuate continued economic growth. All other purposes of universities—including the promise of upward mobility of graduates—were either subordinate to or part of that overarching goal of enabling faculty and graduates to acquire the attitudes, learn the skills, and invent and diffuse the technologies necessary to obtain and sustain the continued economic growth of their nation.

    Since the early 1960s and 70s, as some nations were shifting from being “industrial societies” towards being “information societies” (ICT of course plays a huge role in that change), universities (and all national educational programs) have struggled to deal with the differences and indeed conflicts between education suitable for one or the other. Few if any universities have fully transitioned to focusing on the skills and ideas necessary for information societies, and of course in many parts of the world nations have not yet fully made the transition to industrialism, such less to informationalism.

    Nonetheless, a survey of the long-range plans and policies of many universities in many parts of the world made it clear that almost none of them envision any other future for themselves and their graduates than continued (or renewed) economic growth.

    And yet it is also clear to me from my experience for over forty years as Director of the Hawaii Research Center for Futures Studies within the Department of Political Science of the University of Hawaii at Manoa, in Honolulu, Hawaii, that continued economic growth is only one possible future of the world and all parts of it. It is not even “the most likely” future. Rather, it is one among several “alternative futures.” Educators need to survey the literature supporting the profoundly different images of the futures before committing to any long-range plan and the policies facilitating it.

    It is absolutely essential to determine first what the futures of society generally might be before deciding what the futures of education should be. Few if any educational institutions do this.

    While the number of competing images of the future is vast, our research has shown that each image is a specific example of one of four, “generic” images of the future. We label the four Grow, Collapse, Discipline, and Transform.

    Grow is the widespread, nearly official view of global continued economic growth, mentioned above.

    But more and more people are worried about the viability of such a future. Many very serious and plausible arguments are being made that the 200+ years era of continued economic growth is over. Energy, environmental, economic, and governmental insufficiencies or failures may be pulling it down. While many people bemoan (or deny) this possibility, others affirm and even welcome it.

    Largely in hopes of forestalling collapse, there have been many calls in recent decades for sustainability, self-sufficiency, and harmony. We label that image of the future “Discipline”—the belief that nations and communities need to stop the mad and unsustainable pursuit of mindless growth, and return to or create values and institutions that allow us to live lives of meaning and contentment based on personal and local self-reliance, environmental and social sustainability, and an overall sense of “enoughness”, instead of reeling from endless innovation and precarious change.

    Others—though their numbers are few, their arguments are powerful—give evidence that shows that indeed continued economic growth is over, that collapse is avoidable, and that discipline, as defined, unnecessary. Rather, accelerating and merging electronic, biological, nano- and space-based technologies, among others--are pushing all societies into a world as novel, unpredictable, and surprising as is the transformation of a caterpillar into a butterfly for those who have never seen or heard of that metamorphosis. Humans seem to be creating their own artificially-intelligent successors, while environmental pressures on Earth as well the new environments of Mars and elsewhere will mold new species out of old homosapiens, sapiens as the Holocene Epoch morphs more fully into the Anthropocene Epoch.

    From our years of work in futures studies we firmly believe that “futures of education” should never be undertaken until the alternative futures of the societies in which future graduates will live have been identified. Then, after a careful consideration and evaluation of the full array of alternatives has been made, plans, policies, and actions that will make educational institutions robust over ALL futures (rather than only one, mistakenly assumed to be “the most likely”) should be undertaken.
  • SO: we see the dystopia/utopia tensión played out in Education as in popular culture. We need to understand and be critical of these narratives. No simple answers.
  • Future Present - Nicky Hockly

    1. 1. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Source:http://goo.gl/jeou4K
    2. 2. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Social media challenge! #futurefaapi (@TheConsultantsE) #futurefaapi The Consultants-E
    3. 3. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Social media challenge! be it future used isn't to The what #futurefaapi The Consultants-E
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    8. 8. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present William Gibson Sci-fi writer I use science fiction to understand an unthinkable present […] the strangeness of now […] a drone-heavy future
    9. 9. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Social media challenge! The Consultants-E way future it best is to The the create to predict #futurefaapi
    10. 10. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Source:http://goo.gl/ZiqXhMSource:http://goo.gl/DxlMnK Source:http://goo.gl/1dG7bFSource:http://goo.gl/i0QRrb
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    15. 15. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Source:http://goo.gl/i0QRrb
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    21. 21. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Source:http://goo.gl/iT7M0I
    22. 22. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Social media challenge! The Consultants-E came future went and in The the way mildly dispiriting futures that do #futurefaapi
    23. 23. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Source:http://goo.gl/1dG7bF
    24. 24. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Source:http://goo.gl/1jTLoz
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    31. 31. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Source:http://goo.gl/DxlMnK OR
    32. 32. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Jim Dator University of Hawaii While the number of competing images of the future is vast, our research has shown ... four, “generic” images of the future. We label the four Grow, Collapse, Discipline, and Transform.
    33. 33. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Jim Dator University of Hawaii It is absolutely essential to determine first what the futures of society generally might be before deciding what the futures of education should be. Few if any educational institutions do this.
    34. 34. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present robotics & cyborgs virtual & augmented realities machine translation haptics
    35. 35. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Social media challenge! • The future isn't what it used to be [Paul Valery] • The best way to predict the future is to create it [Abraham Lincoln] • The future came and went in the mildly dispiriting way that futures do [Neil Gaiman] • The past is always tense, the future perfect [Zadie Smith]
    36. 36. Nicky Hockly, The Consultants-E Future present Source:http://goo.gl/jeou4K Contact & Resources http://goo.gl/fQSSMn

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