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Woman Warrior Oral Presentation

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11 IB English

11 IB English

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  • 1. A Song for a Barbarian Reed PipeTheme
    May 17th, 2010
  • 2. Preview
    What is the theme
    How is it demonstrated
    Why Kingston chose this theme
    How is it related to book title
    How is it related to chapter title
  • 3. A Song for a Barbarian Reed PipeTheme
    May 17th, 2010
  • 4. Theme
  • 5. a person should find his/her identity
    Identity
  • 6. Theme
    Identity
  • 7. Identity
    a dilemma of Chinese-American who had “double identities”
  • 8. Identity
    a dilemma of Chinese-American who had “double identities”
  • 9. Identity
    a dilemma of Chinese-American who had “double identities”
    Who you are with
    Who you are
  • 10. Identity
    a dilemma of Chinese-American who had “double identities”
    Identity Crisis
  • 11. Comparison
  • 12. Some facts about Ts’ai Yen
    She had actually been used to the life in barbarians.
    She had two children there.
    The Hsiung-nu leader really loved her and treated her well.
    She actually had complicated feelings when she was told that she could leave, since she had been with her family for 12 years.
  • 13. Comparison
    Kingston
  • 14. Comparison
    Kingston
    Ts’ai Yen
  • 15. Comparison
    Kingston
    double identities -> identity crisis
    (loss of identity)
    Ts’ai Yen
  • 16. Example 1 – Speaking
    Kingston
  • 17. Loud
    The boys who were so well behaved in the American school played tricks on them and talked back to them [in Chinese school]. The girls were not mute. They screamed and yelled during recess, when there were no rules; they had fist fights.
    Kingston, 167
  • 18. Soft
    Normal Chinese women’s voices are strong and bossy. We American-Chinese girls had to whisper to make ourselves American feminine. Apparently we whispered even more softly than the Americans.
    Kingston, 172
  • 19. Example 2 – Language
    Kingston
  • 20. Example 2 – Language (Culture)
    Kingston
  • 21. Literary Feature—mixed language
    I could not understand “I”. The Chinese “I” has seven strokes, intricacies. How could the American “I,” assuredly wearing a hat like the Chinese, have only three strokes, the middle so straight? Was it out of politeness that this writer left off strokes the way a Chinese has to write her own name small and crooked? No , it was not politeness; “I” is a capital and “you” is lower-case.
    Kingston, 166-167
  • 22. Literary Feature—mixed language
    The word for “eclipse” is frog-swallowing-the-moon.
    Kingston, 169
  • 23. Literary Feature—mixed language
    …or you had eaten moon cakes or long noodles for long life (which is a pun).
    Kingston, 185
  • 24. Literary Feature—mixed language
    That’s what we’re supposed to say. That’s what Chinese say. We like to say the opposite.
    Kingston, 203
  • 25. Literary Feature—mixed language
    It was more complicated (and therefore worse) than “dog,” which they say affectionately, mostly to boys. … The river-pirate great-uncle called even my middle brother Ho Chi Kuei, and he seemed to like him best.
    Kingston, 204
  • 26. Literary Feature—mixed language
    “You get reparation candy,” she said. “You say, ‘You have tainted my house with sick medicine and must remove the curse with sweetness.’ He’ll understand”
    “See?” said our mother. “They understand. You kids just aren’t very brave.” But I knew they did not understand. They thought we were beggars without a home who lived in back of the laundry.
    Kingston, 170-171
  • 27. Identity
    Kingston
    Comparison, Examples
    Ts’ai Yen
  • 28. Why this theme
  • 29. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity
    Crazy Mary
  • 30. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity
    Crazy Mary
  • 31. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity
    Crazy Mary
    Pee-A-Nah
  • 32. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity
    Crazy Mary
    Pee-A-Nah
    Kingston
  • 33. Quotation
    I put on my shoes with the open flaps and flapped about like a Wino Ghost. From then on, I wore those shoes to parties, whenever the mothers gathered to talk about marriages.
    Kingston, 194
  • 34. Exemplify the consequence ofloss of identity
    If a person cannot solve his/her identity crisis, he/she might become a “crazy” person shaped by society.
  • 35. paronomasia
    Insane people were the ones who couldn’t explain themselves.
    Kingston, 186
  • 36. How related to woman
  • 37. Kingston emphasizes mainly Chinese-American girls.
    How related to woman
  • 38. Kingston emphasizes mainly Chinese-American girls.
    In ancient China, women are more likely to have identity crisis.
    How related to woman
  • 39. Kingston emphasizes mainly Chinese-American girls.
    In ancient China, women are more likely to have identity crisis.
    How related to woman
  • 40. “A Song for a Barbarian Reed Pipe” symbolizes Kingston’s own writing, as Kingston and Ts’ai Yen face similar dilemma.
    Title
  • 41. “the ending”
    Here is a story my mother told me, not when I was young, but recently,…, the ending, mine.
    Kingston, 186
  • 42. Summary
  • 43. Kingston used her own “tragic” experience as a Chinese-American female to show how hard the life will be if a person has double identities.
    Summary
  • 44. Kingston used her own “tragic” experience as a Chinese-American female to show how hard the life will be if a person has double identities.
    Kingston suggests that people, especially women, take identity crisis seriously and find their own identities, instead of only being driven by relation or society.
    Summary
  • 45. Find out
    who we are
  • 46. Source
    Work cited: Kingston, Maxine Hong. The Woman Warrior. New York: Random, 1976. Print.
    Book cover image: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cover_womanwarrior.jpg