Ethographic opportuntiyanalysis2012(mullooly & delcore)
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  • http://www.onemoregadget.com/pictorial-timeline-of-apple-macintosh-computers-gadgets-and-ipods-in-history/ http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/17.01/ff_mac_viewer.html http://www.ipodhistory.com/ http://theiphonewiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Timeline http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/01/28/timeline-ipad-joins-list-of-apple-product-milestones/

Transcript

  • 1. Ethnographic OpportunityAnalysis 2012 part 1 Hank Delcore & Jim Mullooly aka “TheAnthroGuys” @ www.TheAnthroGuys.com 1
  • 2. n ? a tio n ovIn 2
  • 3.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 1. Introduction of a new/improved good 2. Introduction of a new method of production 3. Opening new market or territory 4. Conquest of a new source of raw materials 5. New type of organization 3
  • 4.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 1. Introduction of a new/improved good Sweet Chocolate 4
  • 5.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 2. Introduction of a new method of productionHenry Ford’sAssembly Line 5
  • 6.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 3. Opening new market or territory Shushi in US 6
  • 7.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) Sugar Beets in 1870s 4. Conquest of a new source of raw materials 7
  • 8.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) Japanese Automotive Administration 5. New type of organization 8
  • 9.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 1. Introduction of a new/improved good Sweet Chocolate 9
  • 10. Steve Jobs Master ofInnovation asimprovementof an existing good 10
  • 11. How PersonalComputerswere Used (1984) 11
  • 12. How Music deviceswere Used (2001) 12
  • 13. How Smart Phoneswere Used (2007) 13
  • 14. How TabletComputerswere Used (2010) 14
  • 15. BUT Apple is a Software Company(Steve Jobs) 15
  • 16.  Apple is a Software Company (Jobs) The Macintosh Interface 16
  • 17. Apple is a Software Company (Jobs) The Ipod’s Itunes Store 17
  • 18. Apple is a Software Company (Jobs) The Iphone’s App Store 18
  • 19. Apple is a Software Company(Jobs) The Ipad’s App Store 19
  • 20. How can youfind theseopportunities? 20
  • 21. 21
  • 22. 22
  • 23. Ethnographic (Inductive) Opportunity Analysis Deductive Approaches – Hypothesis  Data Collection  Analysis  from general to specific Inductive Approaches – Data Collection  Analysis  Hypothesis  from specific to general 23
  • 24. Engineering vs. Reverse Engineering 24
  • 25. 25
  • 26. The AnthroGuy Himself Professor Hank Delcore 26
  • 27. 27
  • 28. Intel Green Homeowners as Lead Adopters 28
  • 29. What People Say TheyDoand What They Do AreDifferent 29
  • 30. The Business Case for User-Driven Innovation Unprecedented specialization and segmentation, multiplied many times over by domestic and international cultural diversity. 30
  • 31. The Value of the Use Case Entrepreneurs can neither assume that they are socially or culturally close to users nor that they can keep up with consumer trends themselves – unless they seek user-centered insights. 31
  • 32. Increased Competition Increased competition from emerging economies Companies can no longer rely on the advantages of being the first to introduce new technologies to the market. 32
  • 33. Democratization ofKnowledge The democratization of knowledge, driven by the internet and information technology in general Armed with lots of information and the ability to buy from companies all over the globe, consumers no longer consider the price/quality trade-off as the sole driver of choice. 33
  • 34. Democratization ofKnowledge Instead, consumers increasingly consider how a company and its products match their own personal values, behaviors and needs. To get at this, successful companies must include users in the innovation process. 34
  • 35. Just to Stay Solvent As Squires and Byrne put it: “…companies have to manufacture the right commodities and deliver them in the right way to the right consumers at least four out of ten times every year – just to stay solvent” (Squires and Byrne 2002:xiv). 35
  • 36.  Traditional R&D departments and entrepreneurs with their own views on “what people want” can no longer keep up with the reality of rapidly evolving needs and desires. 36
  • 37. THE ASSIGNMENT 1) Conduct some sort of “inductive observation”, 2) analyze your notes, then 3) expand those notes into a brief report about what you found. 37
  • 38.  DESCRIPTION – Rather than looking into a completely innovative idea (service or product), the goal is to 1) observe something that already works; 2) observe it in great detail; then 3) begin to understand it in such detail that you can 4) make concrete suggestions about improving it. 38
  • 39.  In Other Words – Rather than looking for how consumers COULD use a NEW service/product, the goal is to observe how consumers DO use a EXISTING service/product with the intention of looking for opportunities to improve or “add value” to that experience. 39
  • 40.  Steps – 1. Find a routine, taken-for-granted task/service/product, – 2. “Hang out” and “thickly describe” it in a notebook, – 3. In a one page pitch, suggest some sort of innovation that will add value. DUE: next Wednesday March 14 by 3:00pm in class. – The best observations will be published on our blog and presented in class on March 21st. 40
  • 41. Ethnographic OpportunityAnalysis part 1 Hank Delcore & Jim Mullooly aka “TheAnthroGuys” @ www.TheAnthroGuys.com Thanks for your Time 41