Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Ethnographic opportunity analysis 2012 (mullooly & delcore))

1,188

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,188
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • http://www.onemoregadget.com/pictorial-timeline-of-apple-macintosh-computers-gadgets-and-ipods-in-history/ http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/17.01/ff_mac_viewer.html http://www.ipodhistory.com/ http://theiphonewiki.com/wiki/index.php?title=Timeline http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/01/28/timeline-ipad-joins-list-of-apple-product-milestones/
  • Transcript

    • 1. Ethnographic OpportunityAnalysis 2012 part 1 Hank Delcore & Jim Mullooly aka “TheAnthroGuys” @ www.TheAnthroGuys.com 1
    • 2. n ? a tio n ovIn 2
    • 3.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 1. Introduction of a new/improved good 2. Introduction of a new method of production 3. Opening new market or territory 4. Conquest of a new source of raw materials 5. New type of organization 3
    • 4.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 1. Introduction of a new/improved good Sweet Chocolate 4
    • 5.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 2. Introduction of a new method of productionHenry Ford’sAssembly Line 5
    • 6.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 3. Opening new market or territory Shushi in US 6
    • 7.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) Sugar Beets in 1870s 4. Conquest of a new source of raw materials 7
    • 8.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) Japanese Automotive Administration 5. New type of organization 8
    • 9.  Innovation in Business (Schumpeter, 1934) 1. Introduction of a new/improved good Sweet Chocolate 9
    • 10. Steve Jobs Master ofInnovation asimprovementof an existing good 10
    • 11. How PersonalComputerswere Used (1984) 11
    • 12. How Music deviceswere Used (2001) 12
    • 13. How Smart Phoneswere Used (2007) 13
    • 14. How TabletComputerswere Used (2010) 14
    • 15. BUT Apple is a Software Company(Steve Jobs) 15
    • 16.  Apple is a Software Company (Jobs) The Macintosh Interface 16
    • 17. Apple is a Software Company (Jobs) The Ipod’s Itunes Store 17
    • 18. Apple is a Software Company (Jobs) The Iphone’s App Store 18
    • 19. Apple is a Software Company(Jobs) The Ipad’s App Store 19
    • 20. How can youfind theseopportunities? 20
    • 21. 21
    • 22. 22
    • 23. Ethnographic (Inductive) Opportunity Analysis Deductive Approaches – Hypothesis  Data Collection  Analysis  from general to specific Inductive Approaches – Data Collection  Analysis  Hypothesis  from specific to general 23
    • 24. Engineering vs. Reverse Engineering 24
    • 25. 25
    • 26. The AnthroGuy Himself Professor Hank Delcore 26
    • 27. 27
    • 28. Intel Green Homeowners as Lead Adopters 28
    • 29. What People Say TheyDoand What They Do AreDifferent 29
    • 30. The Business Case for User-Driven Innovation Unprecedented specialization and segmentation, multiplied many times over by domestic and international cultural diversity. 30
    • 31. The Value of the Use Case Entrepreneurs can neither assume that they are socially or culturally close to users nor that they can keep up with consumer trends themselves – unless they seek user-centered insights. 31
    • 32. Increased Competition Increased competition from emerging economies Companies can no longer rely on the advantages of being the first to introduce new technologies to the market. 32
    • 33. Democratization ofKnowledge The democratization of knowledge, driven by the internet and information technology in general Armed with lots of information and the ability to buy from companies all over the globe, consumers no longer consider the price/quality trade-off as the sole driver of choice. 33
    • 34. Democratization ofKnowledge Instead, consumers increasingly consider how a company and its products match their own personal values, behaviors and needs. To get at this, successful companies must include users in the innovation process. 34
    • 35. Just to Stay Solvent As Squires and Byrne put it: “…companies have to manufacture the right commodities and deliver them in the right way to the right consumers at least four out of ten times every year – just to stay solvent” (Squires and Byrne 2002:xiv). 35
    • 36.  Traditional R&D departments and entrepreneurs with their own views on “what people want” can no longer keep up with the reality of rapidly evolving needs and desires. 36
    • 37. THE ASSIGNMENT 1) Conduct some sort of “inductive observation”, 2) analyze your notes, then 3) expand those notes into a brief report about what you found. 37
    • 38.  DESCRIPTION – Rather than looking into a completely innovative idea (service or product), the goal is to 1) observe something that already works; 2) observe it in great detail; then 3) begin to understand it in such detail that you can 4) make concrete suggestions about improving it. 38
    • 39.  In Other Words – Rather than looking for how consumers COULD use a NEW service/product, the goal is to observe how consumers DO use a EXISTING service/product with the intention of looking for opportunities to improve or “add value” to that experience. 39
    • 40.  Steps – 1. Find a routine, taken-for-granted task/service/product, – 2. “Hang out” and “thickly describe” it in a notebook, – 3. In a one page pitch, suggest some sort of innovation that will add value. DUE: next Wednesday March 21 by 3:00pm in class. – The best observations will be published on our blog and presented in class on March 21st. 40
    • 41. Ethnographic OpportunityAnalysis part 1 Hank Delcore & Jim Mullooly aka “TheAnthroGuys” @ www.TheAnthroGuys.com Thanks for your Time 41

    ×