WordPress - Open Source Overview Presentation
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WordPress - Open Source Overview Presentation

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My WordPress introductory presentation at the Open Source Overview presented by MyCity4Her.com at the ETC in Baltimore on July 21, 2011.

My WordPress introductory presentation at the Open Source Overview presented by MyCity4Her.com at the ETC in Baltimore on July 21, 2011.

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WordPress - Open Source Overview Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Open Source OverviewAndy Stratton / WordPress Developer / http://theandystratton.com
  • 2. What is WordPress?• Content management platform• PHP and MySQL web application• Created by Matt Mullenweg (@photomatt) and Mike Little• In production for over 8 years• Can run on most hosting environments
  • 3. History of the Software• Roots go back to the b2/cafelog blogging software from 2001• WordPress branch started in 2003• started as a blogging platform• 2004: Plugins• 2005: Themes
  • 4. History of the Software• 2007: Widgets, tagging and advanced UI introduced• 2008: Better Admin UI and shortcodes were introduced• 2009: Theme installer, trash/undo feature, oEmbed support• 2010: Custom Post Types, Multisite
  • 5. History of the Software• 2011: WordPress 3.0 released• 32.5 million downloads in 8 months• Most downloaded open source CMS
  • 6. Version 1.5 - Theme
  • 7. Version 3.2 - Theme
  • 8. Version 1.5 - Admin
  • 9. Version 2.3 - Admin
  • 10. Version 2.9 - Admin
  • 11. Version 3.2 - Admin
  • 12. WordPress.com• WordPress.com is a community of free hosted blogs running on a modified version of WordPress• Typically: username.wordpress.com• Can be linked to domain (fee)• Limited theme/plugin installs
  • 13. WordPress.com
  • 14. WordPress.org• Source code, theme and plugin repository• Where you download the PHP/MySQL code to run on your own server• Self-managed, no-restrictions• Free!
  • 15. WordPress.org
  • 16. Who is using WP?• Anyone and everyone• Bloggers, designers, developers• Actors, Musicians (Katy Perry)• Schools and Universities (Harvard)• Small and big business
  • 17. Who is usingWordPress?
  • 18. Image of WordPress• One of the most powerful open-source CMS platforms on the Internet• Scrutinized for past security issues and typically bashed when any security issues occur• Common with all open-source apps
  • 19. Image of WordPress• Most security issues now spawn from users/site owners not following best practices to secure their sites: • Insecure passwords (site hacked) • Poor hosting environments • Installing unsafe plugins/themes
  • 20. What is a CMS platform?• a base library of functionality that allows users to publish a variety of content to the web• powers the website that visitors see• requires minimal programming knowledge, if any
  • 21. Why is a platform important?• maintain aesthetic quality and usability of the website• enable users to publish content (communicate with audience)• ideally, it can be extended/enhanced as needed by programmers/platform
  • 22. So, What’s It Do?• Blog Post Management • Excerpts • Featured Image • Categories • Tags • Archives (Date, Author, Tag, Cat,
  • 23. Featured Image• Upload and resize an image specifically attached to the post/ page you are editing• Can be later used by themes in the design or by plugins to extend
  • 24. Category vs. Tag• Both are methods of classifying content• Categories are hierarchical, which means it can have a parent or children, for example: • United States • Maryland
  • 25. Category vs. Tag• Tags are non-hierarchical, a tag is a tag and doesn’t belong to anyone • crab feasts • happy hour • restaurant
  • 26. Custom Fields• Custom fields are arbitrary name/value pairs that can be stored with a piece of content• Can be used by a theme / plugin to conditionally perform an action or display content
  • 27. Custom Fields
  • 28. So, What’s It Do?• Page Management • Hierarchical • Sortable (menu order) • Featured Image • Custom Fields
  • 29. So, What’s It Do?• Media Management • Just about any file you can upload • Image sizes and insertion into editor • Image galleries API • Can be attached to posts/pages
  • 30. So, What’s It Do?• Menus • Can be used within themes/plugins • Can be assigned to theme locations• Widgets • Used in widgetized sidebars
  • 31. So, What’s It Do?• Password protected posts/pages• Cross-blog communication, trackbacks and pingbacks• Typography conversion and smart text formatting• Import/Export from many popular
  • 32. So, What’s It Do?• Permalink URL’s • e.g. /blog/name-of-the-post/• HTTP Headers • 404 headers • 301 headers
  • 33. Extend with Plugins• PHP code that extend/modify the default behavior of WP• Can be downloaded and installed from the public repository within the admin interface • Over 15,000 free plugins to date
  • 34. What Can Plugins Do?• Modify existing behavior of WordPress via hooks and actions, e.g. • Change the content of notification emails • Add registration fields for user accounts • Spam filtering (comments)
  • 35. What Can Plugins Do?• Add functionality to WordPress • Custom post types • Custom taxonomies • Shortcodes • Contact and lead submission forms • Search optimization (custom post/page meta data and titles) • Job boards, portfolio management, social
  • 36. Custom Post Types• Custom posts types are a content type, like a post or a page • Title, content, excerpt, sorting, hierarchies, thumbnails, etc.• Support any features a post/page can support
  • 37. Custom Post Types• Examples: • Events • Job Opportunities • Portfolio Entries • Car Inventory
  • 38. Custom Taxonomies• A taxonomy is a method of classifying something• In WordPress, a custom taxonomy is a way of classifying content• Can be hierarchical (like categories) or non-hierarchical (like tags)
  • 39. Custom Taxonomies• Examples: • Department • Type of Work (print, web, etc.) • Car Make (Audi, BMW, Mercedes...) • Product Category
  • 40. Shortcodes• Shortcodes are a simple method of inserting dynamic content into a section of WordPress post/page content• Formatted with square brackets, e.g.: [gravityform id=”1” description=”false”]
  • 41. Shortcodes• When content is displayed on the website, [gravityform id=”1” description=”false”] is replaced with an HTML form that accepts submissions• Can be used for a variety of things
  • 42. Some Uses for Shortcodes• Insert a dynamic contact form • See Gravity Forms, www.gravityforms.com• Insert complex HTML/CSS code • See Raw HTML Snippets, http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/raw-html-snippets/• List links to all child pages of the current page • See List Children http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/list-children/
  • 43. Getting Plugins• There is a repository of over 15,000 free WordPress plugins at: • http://www.wordpress.org/extend/plugins• You can find third-party plugins on websites for free• You can find premium (paid) plugins
  • 44. Getting PluginsPlugins from theWordPress.orgrepository can befound/installeddirectly within thesoftware
  • 45. Free Plugins• Repository is the best place for free plugins, especially if you’re not a WordPress developer• Many are audited• Quick community response for security and functionality issues• Be very weary of third-party sites with
  • 46. Premium Plugins• Plugins like Gravity Forms, Shopp and other paid plugins• To maintain open source licensing, you’re paying for access to the download and support• More trustworthy than free plugins
  • 47. Themes• Themes are a package of visual design templates that display content on a WordPress website• Free and paid themes• Can embed plugin functionality within the theme files
  • 48. Common Templates• Blog home page/index• Single blog post page• Archives (category, tag, date, author, etc.)• Single page• Comments area• Site search results
  • 49. Free Themes• 1,400+ free themes at WordPress.org• Support most core features• Aesthetic quality and support vary
  • 50. Premium* Themes• Marketplaces like ThemeForest.com• Dedicated companies/sites, like: • WooThemes.com • iThemes.com • ElegantThemes.com• Quality can vary greatly: speed, functionality, compatibility with plugins
  • 51. Theme Frameworks• Theme Frameworks also exist• Typically a platform that sits on top of a platform• Include base sets of plugin functionality like SEO and visual/template options• Thesis and Genesis are two popular
  • 52. What Can WordPress Do For My Business?• Power your blog and/or website• Make it easier to publish content• Optimize your site for organic search• Make it easier to evolve your website with your business/publishing needs• Anything with the right designer or
  • 53. Security• Core team is obsessed with security • Mark Jaquith, lead developer & security despot!• Entire WP community has eyes on security issues and bugs• Security issues tend to spawn from negligent administration• Best practices and tutorials for coders
  • 54. Software Updates• Notices given in the admin interface for plugins, themes & WP core updates• Released early and often• Typically bug fixes, security enhancements and speed optimizations• Free
  • 55. Questions?Comments?
  • 56. Thank You.