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Mobilie Solutions for Libraries: Where We Are, Where We're Going
 

Mobilie Solutions for Libraries: Where We Are, Where We're Going

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As the mobile environment continues to mature, libraries are employing a variety of exciting and innovative tools to make their services available anywhere, any time. In this dynamic presentation, ...

As the mobile environment continues to mature, libraries are employing a variety of exciting and innovative tools to make their services available anywhere, any time. In this dynamic presentation, Toby Greenwalt, Skokie Public Library’s Virtual Services Coordinator, provides an overview of how libraries of all sizes and levels of technological expertise can meet their patrons’ needs via mobile devices.

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  • Slide 1: Introduction\nGood morning, everyone. My name is Toby Greenwalt. For those of you who don’t know me, I am the Virtual Services Coordinator for the Skokie Public Library. Essentially, it’s my job to develop our online presence to the point where it’s just as useful and dynamic as our physical space. \nMy training is that of a social scientist – and it’s that background that informs my approach to this job. The services that have worked most successfully are those that are able to reach a critical mass of patrons. I use this quote from Clay Shirky all the time – perhaps too much – but I think it’s true: “Things don’t tend to get socially interesting until they get technologically boring.” \n\nLucky for us, because there’s nothing more boring right now than mobile technology. So thanks a lot for inviting me to come in and speak, Gwyneth. The only thing that might be more disruptive to our current situation is eBooks, and it’s not like RLA would ever invite me to speak about that. \nMore than just about any other technology, mobile devices give individuals more potential to do stuff than ever before. And it’s having a massive impact on a number of entrenched institutions. We’ve got some catching up to do, and working to fit into this environment is going to push us out of our comfort zones quite a bit. \n\nI don’t claim to know the future. Like Richard, I’m struggling in my fantasy football league. (Though I prefer to call it “competitive predictions of comparative data.”) My pick ‘em pool is even worse. My lack of technical skill instead relies on finding other successes and adapting or improving them for my own purposes. (Like that fantasy football joke.) \n\nI’ve been studying mobile tools for long enough that I think I’m beginning to get a sense of what tools we have at our disposal, and how we can make them work. \n\n\n
  • And one way we can look at what works is to take a look at some of the things that haven’t worked. \n\nI’ve been attempting to design mobile library services for around three years. \nLSTA Grant activity\nAdorableness of Blackberry\nText message notifications\nMobile website\n\nStill struggling along.\nTexting has a niche, but not the widespread adoption rate I had hoped it would have.\n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Site examples - signposts\nVox pops: how many people have iPhones? Android phones? \nHow many of you have upgraded in the past year?\n\nNow, let’s extrapolate this across the multitude of other connected devices. eBook readers, iPod touches, web TV – the cost of creating a specific tool for each environment far outweighs the potential benefits of the audience. \n\n(Let’s not even mention the horrendousness of some of the library apps that are out there – Gale, EBSCO, etc.) \n\nGood chance you have patrons for whom a mobile device is their only real means of access to the Internet. According to Pew, 25% of smartphone users use their devices as their sole means of Internet access. It’s now possible to get a data plan for around $35 a month – a cost that’s far less expensive than most landline Internet plans, and that includes phone calls, text messaging, and portability. Some people may even exist in a hybrid environment, where they use their phones for day-to-day access, and our computers when necessary. \n\nNow, here’s my bold statement of the day. If we want to reach these people, we can’t just focus on creating a virtual signpost. We’ve got to focus on doing stuff. \n
  • Examples from the audience. \n\nThe device becomes much more than just a phone – it’s a means to many different ends, all specifically chosen by the user. It’s at times a media player, a personal organizer, a digital assistant, a boredom alleviator. What’s important is its ability to fulfill this precise purpose at the precise point of need. \n\nFailing to do this means your services get ignored. We see this happen with apps all the time. Pew’s latest survey found that only about 68% of people who had apps on their phones had actually used any of them. \n\nNow, I don’t want to discourage you from pursuing an app. We’re working with Boopsie right now to develop our own library app. But if you’re going to spend the time, money, and effort to go down this road, you’ll need to make sure you’re able to provide the right service at the right time. \n
  • Examples from the audience. \n\nThe device becomes much more than just a phone – it’s a means to many different ends, all specifically chosen by the user. It’s at times a media player, a personal organizer, a digital assistant, a boredom alleviator. What’s important is its ability to fulfill this precise purpose at the precise point of need. \n\nFailing to do this means your services get ignored. We see this happen with apps all the time. Pew’s latest survey found that only about 68% of people who had apps on their phones had actually used any of them. \n\nNow, I don’t want to discourage you from pursuing an app. We’re working with Boopsie right now to develop our own library app. But if you’re going to spend the time, money, and effort to go down this road, you’ll need to make sure you’re able to provide the right service at the right time. \n
  • Examples from the audience. \n\nThe device becomes much more than just a phone – it’s a means to many different ends, all specifically chosen by the user. It’s at times a media player, a personal organizer, a digital assistant, a boredom alleviator. What’s important is its ability to fulfill this precise purpose at the precise point of need. \n\nFailing to do this means your services get ignored. We see this happen with apps all the time. Pew’s latest survey found that only about 68% of people who had apps on their phones had actually used any of them. \n\nNow, I don’t want to discourage you from pursuing an app. We’re working with Boopsie right now to develop our own library app. But if you’re going to spend the time, money, and effort to go down this road, you’ll need to make sure you’re able to provide the right service at the right time. \n
  • Examples from the audience. \n\nThe device becomes much more than just a phone – it’s a means to many different ends, all specifically chosen by the user. It’s at times a media player, a personal organizer, a digital assistant, a boredom alleviator. What’s important is its ability to fulfill this precise purpose at the precise point of need. \n\nFailing to do this means your services get ignored. We see this happen with apps all the time. Pew’s latest survey found that only about 68% of people who had apps on their phones had actually used any of them. \n\nNow, I don’t want to discourage you from pursuing an app. We’re working with Boopsie right now to develop our own library app. But if you’re going to spend the time, money, and effort to go down this road, you’ll need to make sure you’re able to provide the right service at the right time. \n
  • Examples from the audience. \n\nThe device becomes much more than just a phone – it’s a means to many different ends, all specifically chosen by the user. It’s at times a media player, a personal organizer, a digital assistant, a boredom alleviator. What’s important is its ability to fulfill this precise purpose at the precise point of need. \n\nFailing to do this means your services get ignored. We see this happen with apps all the time. Pew’s latest survey found that only about 68% of people who had apps on their phones had actually used any of them. \n\nNow, I don’t want to discourage you from pursuing an app. We’re working with Boopsie right now to develop our own library app. But if you’re going to spend the time, money, and effort to go down this road, you’ll need to make sure you’re able to provide the right service at the right time. \n
  • Examples from the audience. \n\nThe device becomes much more than just a phone – it’s a means to many different ends, all specifically chosen by the user. It’s at times a media player, a personal organizer, a digital assistant, a boredom alleviator. What’s important is its ability to fulfill this precise purpose at the precise point of need. \n\nFailing to do this means your services get ignored. We see this happen with apps all the time. Pew’s latest survey found that only about 68% of people who had apps on their phones had actually used any of them. \n\nNow, I don’t want to discourage you from pursuing an app. We’re working with Boopsie right now to develop our own library app. But if you’re going to spend the time, money, and effort to go down this road, you’ll need to make sure you’re able to provide the right service at the right time. \n
  • Examples from the audience. \n\nThe device becomes much more than just a phone – it’s a means to many different ends, all specifically chosen by the user. It’s at times a media player, a personal organizer, a digital assistant, a boredom alleviator. What’s important is its ability to fulfill this precise purpose at the precise point of need. \n\nFailing to do this means your services get ignored. We see this happen with apps all the time. Pew’s latest survey found that only about 68% of people who had apps on their phones had actually used any of them. \n\nNow, I don’t want to discourage you from pursuing an app. We’re working with Boopsie right now to develop our own library app. But if you’re going to spend the time, money, and effort to go down this road, you’ll need to make sure you’re able to provide the right service at the right time. \n
  • At the core of all this is the concept of disintermediation – the ability to cut out any middlemen or gatekeepers in a given process. \n\nGriffey – Mouse scrolling\nMagazine is not an iPad\n\nThese are all examples of the way the hardware brings us much closer to technology. But the best software also functions as a disintermediating force. \n\nCompare the process of uploading a photo to FB then vs. now. \nSteps involved \n\nThe apps that work best are the ones that blend into the overall workflow of the device. You don’t have to start the app up – you just have to click Share and work from there. \n
  • Fitting the library into this workflow is going to take some work, and it’s going to require us to step outside our territorial bubbles quite a bit. \n\nSomething we’ve heard a lot before, but it doesn’t always extend to the virtual environment. We’re going to have to poke our heads out from beyond the protection of our websites in order to outline some new strategies for engagement and useful service. \n\nIt’s not without risks. Venturing into this uncharted territory may require us to give up some level of control. We might even – horrors! - have to talk to a few people in the process. \n
  • To help us prepare, we’ve got to think about our strengths. \n\nBaltimore – Nate Hill – DLF – DPLA\n\nContent both traditional and homegrown\nMedia lab - new audience\nTime to think about archiving this as a document of the community.\n
  • Context - our ability to sort through all the stuff in our collections and beyond.\n\nReadalike lists\nArticles on current events\nResearch assistance\nPrograms\n
  • Community \n\nSpace for people to come together and interact.\nPrograms\nBook groups\nRegular patrons - the "water cooler" chat\n\nWe're now seeing dozens of virtual spaces that help facilitate senses of belonging among their clientele. The mobile environment is making it possible for these gatherings to occur anywhere and anytime.\n\nEveryBlock\nTwitter\nInstagram\nFood spotting\nYelp\n\nIf people feel\n
  • Nate cited the previous three items as essential features to any library, but I'm going to add a fourth.\n\nConvenience is another resource whose importance cannot be stressed enough. Libraries have thrived on being the place to go for hard-to-find resources. Now when items can be found with a tap on a screen and a couple of bucks we have to leverage the core reasons people come to the library : doing stuff. \n\nWhether its experiencing a new story, trying to find a job, conducting research, or simply getting out of the house, libraries have long functioned as a platform for our patrons to achieve their goals. Not everyone uses the same resources, but the library creates the space and offers the a variety of tools for everyone to meet their goals. \n
  • We can apply that same principle to the mobile environment. \n\nThese things will take some work. But the tools for creating more connected libraries are out there. \n\nCloud storage - near limitless room to back up data\nServices to hook it to - APIs/mash ups\nCompatibility across devices\nSocial features - need for an audience of users and participants\n\nLets take a look at some of these resources. Some of these will seem standard by now, while some are more speculative. But theyre all parts of a much larger mobile environment. It's up to each of to determine which ones provide the best fit for your organizations, and how best to connect them with your desired audience.\n\nAsk questions, don't be afraid to interrupt me\n
  • Let’s start with the most common use for the mobile phone. \n\nSMS still the most popular use of mobile devices\nPossible decline? (costs outweighing convenience?)\n\nShoutbomb as example – works, but for limited audience\nLearning curve\nPassive features may not be as important (think promotional offers)\n\nWhat is important? Sense of connection, w/o direct contact more than half of heavy texters prefer SMS to talking)\nCan we be a part of this stream?\n
  • Connection – SMS as magpie service\n\nThe tools for making your library more text-friendly are largely unchanged. \n\nText a librarian\n\nGoogle voice\nLibraryh3lp/chat software\n\nWhat's important here? \nReliability- speed of response\nAbility to provide answers in small chunks\nTurning conversation to another medium when necessary \n
  • Other simple tools- so simple many patrons are already using it\nCardstar-Keyring\n(reward cards, movie tickets, boarding passes)\n\nScanners even capable? (CCD scanner v. Laser scanner- LED vs mirror)\n\nRules: possible to spoof a card?\nRisks? Risks of limiting practice? Will you stop practice entirely?\n\nOther uses: red laser app- built-in catalog search (another magpie tool)\n
  • Square/mobile payments\nCardCase\n\nAssist w/outreach\n\nCollecting fines, Book sales, Merchandise\n
  • Speculative uses\nApple easy pay - part of apple store for several years now\n\nMobile checkout\n\nCompare with Tech logic/boopsie app - why is it so hard for patrons to check out free books, and so easy for Apple to sell $ 1000+ electronics? \n
  • Moving on- mobile device as a means of accessing data\n\nQR codes - embedding web links into real-world content \nWho's tried these out? What have you done? Has it worked?\n\nBacklash- possibly due to overuse\nLack of integration\nConsider purposes, and situations where someone might be compelled to scan\n\nSetting these up- google search away\nbit.ly for stats\n
  • Denver airport\n\nSpeculative uses: weekly/monthly article\nPatrons download and discuss\n\nTake advantage if captive audiences\nCellStories\n\n\n
  • Explanation of NFC -compatibility with RFID protocol\nTouchanote\nBump - similar service that uses Bluetooth\n\nWhat are the possibilities here?\nInstructions - how to work copier\nProgram registrations\nOther digital giveaways\nStore card info - mobile checkout\n
  • So many devices are GPS capable now \n\nMaps providing all sorts of embedded data\nExamine maps to make sure information is correct\n\nMarketing-look for review sites (yelp) - ensure services are received positively and conduct outreach\n\nBut it's the social features I'm most drawn to once again.\n\n\n
  • Four square\nRobust statistics module\nRewards for people who use the system\nAdvanced Foursquare Theory\n\nHow are you using this service (gowalla, etc)?\n
  • Speculative uses: check in by item\nHow it works - rewards/stickers for users\n\nInitial reluctance - potential for harvesting data\nHow do we get a presence here?\nPossible applications - rewards, summer reading, one book programs\n\nLinks from catalog?\nCan we create our own version of this?\n\nHas anyone tried to contact these people?\n
  • History pin/scan Jose\n\nHistory pin - example of a group that's interested in working with libs\n\nScanjose - homegrown app mashing up historical data to provide walking tours\n
  • Harvesting existing content\n\nMobile-friendly blogs\nCompatibility with offline readers like Instapaper\n\nRSS services: podcast renaissance\n\nEven streaming video (OWS stuff right now)\nInstantaneous documentation.\nEngaging patrons- vox pops as way of facilitating discussion ( remember the article?) \n
  • Google plus hangouts\nKik\nGroupme\n\nBuild around topics: book discussions, key programs, library lab groups\nChoose an event where this sort of space might be useful and work from there. Have a moderator check in from time to time.\n\n\n
  • Social reading\n\nLinked notes, Kindle-style\n(not dissimilar to how a wiki works)\nThink back to that monthly article you pick up off the QR code at train station\n\nAsynchronous book discussions\n\n
  • Possible avenue: small demons\n\nPotential partnership\nExtra layer of rich data for us\nDedicated user base for them\nDelicious stats from all!\n
  • Real killer mobile app: the web itself.\n\nWeb design is a whole other workshop\nRachel Vacek's Library Mobile Web Design slideshare\n\nTemplates for wp/Drupal\n\nHTML5 - most exciting stuff (show google.com/nexus if time)\nCommands to link with web apps\nApp-like style\nGeolocation, etc. \nBetter media embeds\n\nStuff still being discovered. Good place to start devoting energy. (boopsie as stopgap in interim?)\n
  • Other places taking similar magpie approach\n\nSeabird demo- all this stuff already exists, just not in a collected form factor \n\nImportant to remember how tech plays a long game\nAs mobile devices become as powerful as full size devices, we're also seeing full size devices take on properties of mobile web.\n
  • AR stuff\n\nGoggles (wheres my API for this?)\nLayar\nShelvAR u of Miami\n
  • AR stuff\n\nGoggles (wheres my API for this?)\nLayar\nShelvAR u of Miami\n
  • AR stuff\n\nGoggles (wheres my API for this?)\nLayar\nShelvAR u of Miami\n
  • Siri: will you make libraries obsolete?\nI'm sorry, I don't understand your question. What's a library?\n\nMassive r&d money going to voice\nDevices already use it as input method. How long before the web catches up?\n
  • Kinect\nOblong g-speak space \nMinority report\nAdded layers of interaction - will we be able to Design for 3d environments?\n\n
  • Immobile devices becoming more mobileish\n\nScroll on Lion machines - why would they do this?\nNext step: bring in line with other touch-friendly devices \n
  • Which tools would you like to implement?\n\nFocus on which things you think people would like to do, and work from there\n\n
  • importance of play - take things for test drives\n\nEbooks as example - no longer able to shift the job to tech support when they have the device in hand\n
  • Don't just look at what people are saying, but how they're saying it. \n\nTwitter/Facebook indicators of input format used\nIdeas for engagement\n
  • Importance of personality - people power is one of our last true advantages\n
  • Responsive design – tester to examine how site renders on small screens\nHands per device theory – how people engage based on how many hands they have on the device\n\nOther features – dialer codes for phone numbers, map launchers\n\nAgain, with a limited canvas and lots of competition for space, it's far more important to focus on what people want to do than to show off everything you have. \n
  • Probably cant hire\nInterns\nHs students\nCollege students\n\nCS people love working with libraries - good introductions to databases, along with rich base of material to work with (see, catalogers are still good for something!) \n
  • Disadvantage of the local focus - the numbers game\n\nProject Sheldon as example – \nApp uses existing tools – geolocation, RSS, social features to create a useful app that provides content, context, and community\n\nDPLA - need for a critical mass\nShelflife/library cloud (shared workspaces for research/doing stuff)\nMobile environment is eliminating additional borders of the web. Need to harness some wide-ranging tools to preserve our sense of place\n
  • Let's here your ideas.\n
  • \n

Mobilie Solutions for Libraries: Where We Are, Where We're Going Mobilie Solutions for Libraries: Where We Are, Where We're Going Presentation Transcript

  • Mobile Solutions for Libraries:where we are, where were goingToby Greenwalt November 10, 2011@theanalogdivide RLA CE
  • Where Ive been
  • Creating a mobile library space
  • Creating a mobile library space
  • Creating a mobile library space
  • Creating a mobile library space
  • Creating a mobile library space
  • Creating a mobile library space
  • Creating a mobile library space ?
  • Its all about doing stuff.
  • Its all about doing stuff.
  • Its all about doing stuff.
  • Disintermediation
  • Disintermediation
  • Stepping out of the bubble
  • Stepping out of the bubbleHere bepatrons
  • Content
  • Context
  • Community
  • Convenience
  • We can build it
  • SMS services
  • SMS Services
  • This phone is a library card
  • Mobile Payments
  • Mobile Payments
  • ou t? ckMobile Payments he C
  • QR Codes – Embedded Data
  • QR Codes – Embedded Data
  • Near-Field Communication
  • Geolocation
  • Check-in services
  • Check-in by item: GetGlue
  • Geolocation for artifacts
  • Content creation
  • Content creation
  • Conversational spaces
  • Social reading
  • Social reading
  • HTML5 as killer app
  • HTML5 as killer app
  • Other hardware innovations
  • Augmented Reality
  • Augmented Reality
  • Augmented Reality
  • Augmented Reality
  • Voice recognition
  • Motion controls
  • Desktop Mobile interfaces
  • What we can do
  • Play
  • Listen
  • Be yourselves
  • Design for the mobile web http://mattkersley.com/
  • Design for the mobile web http://mattkersley.com/
  • Adopt a coder
  • Work together
  • Thank you Continue the conversation:theanalogdivide.com | @theanalogdivide | theanalogdivide@gmail.com
  • Image creditsSkokie Public Library photos by Toby Greenwalt and Ruth Sinker Screenshots taken by Toby Greenwalt http://www.flickr.com/photos/4nitsirk/5106445887/sizes/o http://www.flickr.com/photos/rwphoto/4519581602/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/74845103@N00/344484054/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/arrrika/291107648/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidking/5502725708/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/littlehonda_350/3045156028/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/karenchen/6314906775 http://www.codebabies.com http://www.facebook.com/engagingones Please dont sue me, Quentin.