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Tebtebbas presentation

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  • 1. Perspectives and Progress onSafeguards: Indigenous Peoples’ Experiences 7 June 2011, Bonn, Germany Vicky Tauli-Corpuz Executive Director, Tebtebba Tebtebba Indigenous Peoples’ International Centre for Policy Research and Education
  • 2. • The UN Food and Agriculture Organization tables on changes in forested land by country: www.fao.org/forestry/site/32033/en/The UN Food and Agriculture Organization tables on changes in forested land by country:www.fao.org/forestry/site/32033/en/
  • 3. Forest Tenure: Regional Differences Source: Sunderlin, et al. 2008.
  • 4. Where is Extensive Poverty and Slow or No Economic Growth? 3.50%• Extensive, chronic, povertyin forest areas (highest 3.00% Average Annual GDP Per Capita Growth 1975-2004“rates”, across the world) 2.50%• “Growth” located in urban, 2.00%coastal areas 1.50%• “Forest rich” countries, andforest regions doing 1.00%significantly worse 0.50% 0.00%• ITTO producer countries Africa Asia & Oceania L America & Caribbean Developing Worlddoing even worse (poverty -0.50%too is a function of privileged -1.00%business model) High Forest Countries* Low Forest Countries
  • 5. Where Human Rights are violated and What is the Status of Governance?  At least 15 million people lack citizenship recognition – including hill tribes of SEForest areas: about 30% of Asia, most Pygmies of Congo Basinglobal land area, over 1 billion  Lack of respect for property rights; whenof world’s poorest: socially and governments claim 75% of world’spolitically disenfranchised forests – “myth of empty forests’ prevails resulting in illegal conservation, concessions to non-owners, dispossession and refugees  Women disproportionately disadvantaged, politically, legally, economically and culturally – not a “boutique” or “luxury” issue  Corruption, limited rule of law, limited accountability, judicial redress  Lack of basic public services, forests as “hinterland”, exploited by distant elite
  • 6. Where is Conflict Taking Place? In the past twenty years 30 countries in the tropical regions of the world have experienced significant conflict between armed groups in forest areas. 53% of African forest area, 22% of Asian forest: over 127 million people directly affected – “land” key driver in 40-70%Source: D.Kaimowitz ETFRN NEWS 43/44
  • 7. What are the risks – Undoing of Governments and“Development” • If we do not settle the questions of rights and tenure in this early stages of biggest economic/political/climatic transition in modern history • Risk of: • Expanded civil conflicts, • Further social and political marginalization of indigenous and forest peoples • Continued deforestation and increased carbon emission • Undoing of governments and “development” • Forest sector: Haven’t dealt with past, not yet equipped for the future – what needs to be done?
  • 8. What are the risks – Undoing of Governments and“Development” • If we do not settle the questions of rights and tenure in this early stages of biggest economic/political/climatic transition in modern history • Risk of: • Expanded civil conflicts, • Further social and political marginalization of indigenous and forest peoples • Continued deforestation and increased carbon emission • Undoing of governments and “development” • Forest sector: Haven’t dealt with past, not yet equipped for the future – what needs to be done?
  • 9. What are the risks – Undoing of Governments and“Development” • If we do not settle the questions of rights and tenure in this early stages of biggest economic/political/climatic transition in modern history • Risk of: • Expanded civil conflicts, • Further social and political marginalization of indigenous and forest peoples • Continued deforestation and increased carbon emission • Undoing of governments and “development” • Forest sector: Haven’t dealt with past, not yet equipped for the future – what needs to be done?
  • 10. FPIC in UNDRIP(Articles 10,11,28,29,32)• 10 – no relocation without FPIC• 11 – recover cultural property taken without FPIC• 28 – restoration of LTR taken without FPIC• 29 – no stockpiling of nuclear wastes• 32- FPIC before project is put in IP lands
  • 11. Important developments :• US, Canada, NZ, Australia endorsed UNDRIP - 2010• Dec. 30, 2011 –Republic of Congo passed a national law on the rights of indigenous peoples. (Baaka, Mbendjele, Mikaya, Luma, Gyeli, Twa and Babongo)• Indonesia Parliament drafting IP Law
  • 12. Email: vicky@tebtebba.orgWebsites:www.tebtebba.orgwww.indigenousclimate.orgTHANK YOU!DAKKEL AY IYAMAN!

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