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Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
Tebtebbas presentation
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Tebtebbas presentation

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  1. Perspectives and Progress onSafeguards: Indigenous Peoples’ Experiences 7 June 2011, Bonn, Germany Vicky Tauli-Corpuz Executive Director, Tebtebba Tebtebba Indigenous Peoples’ International Centre for Policy Research and Education
  2. • The UN Food and Agriculture Organization tables on changes in forested land by country: www.fao.org/forestry/site/32033/en/The UN Food and Agriculture Organization tables on changes in forested land by country:www.fao.org/forestry/site/32033/en/
  3. Forest Tenure: Regional Differences Source: Sunderlin, et al. 2008.
  4. Where is Extensive Poverty and Slow or No Economic Growth? 3.50%• Extensive, chronic, povertyin forest areas (highest 3.00% Average Annual GDP Per Capita Growth 1975-2004“rates”, across the world) 2.50%• “Growth” located in urban, 2.00%coastal areas 1.50%• “Forest rich” countries, andforest regions doing 1.00%significantly worse 0.50% 0.00%• ITTO producer countries Africa Asia & Oceania L America & Caribbean Developing Worlddoing even worse (poverty -0.50%too is a function of privileged -1.00%business model) High Forest Countries* Low Forest Countries
  5. Where Human Rights are violated and What is the Status of Governance?  At least 15 million people lack citizenship recognition – including hill tribes of SEForest areas: about 30% of Asia, most Pygmies of Congo Basinglobal land area, over 1 billion  Lack of respect for property rights; whenof world’s poorest: socially and governments claim 75% of world’spolitically disenfranchised forests – “myth of empty forests’ prevails resulting in illegal conservation, concessions to non-owners, dispossession and refugees  Women disproportionately disadvantaged, politically, legally, economically and culturally – not a “boutique” or “luxury” issue  Corruption, limited rule of law, limited accountability, judicial redress  Lack of basic public services, forests as “hinterland”, exploited by distant elite
  6. Where is Conflict Taking Place? In the past twenty years 30 countries in the tropical regions of the world have experienced significant conflict between armed groups in forest areas. 53% of African forest area, 22% of Asian forest: over 127 million people directly affected – “land” key driver in 40-70%Source: D.Kaimowitz ETFRN NEWS 43/44
  7. What are the risks – Undoing of Governments and“Development” • If we do not settle the questions of rights and tenure in this early stages of biggest economic/political/climatic transition in modern history • Risk of: • Expanded civil conflicts, • Further social and political marginalization of indigenous and forest peoples • Continued deforestation and increased carbon emission • Undoing of governments and “development” • Forest sector: Haven’t dealt with past, not yet equipped for the future – what needs to be done?
  8. What are the risks – Undoing of Governments and“Development” • If we do not settle the questions of rights and tenure in this early stages of biggest economic/political/climatic transition in modern history • Risk of: • Expanded civil conflicts, • Further social and political marginalization of indigenous and forest peoples • Continued deforestation and increased carbon emission • Undoing of governments and “development” • Forest sector: Haven’t dealt with past, not yet equipped for the future – what needs to be done?
  9. What are the risks – Undoing of Governments and“Development” • If we do not settle the questions of rights and tenure in this early stages of biggest economic/political/climatic transition in modern history • Risk of: • Expanded civil conflicts, • Further social and political marginalization of indigenous and forest peoples • Continued deforestation and increased carbon emission • Undoing of governments and “development” • Forest sector: Haven’t dealt with past, not yet equipped for the future – what needs to be done?
  10. FPIC in UNDRIP(Articles 10,11,28,29,32)• 10 – no relocation without FPIC• 11 – recover cultural property taken without FPIC• 28 – restoration of LTR taken without FPIC• 29 – no stockpiling of nuclear wastes• 32- FPIC before project is put in IP lands
  11. Important developments :• US, Canada, NZ, Australia endorsed UNDRIP - 2010• Dec. 30, 2011 –Republic of Congo passed a national law on the rights of indigenous peoples. (Baaka, Mbendjele, Mikaya, Luma, Gyeli, Twa and Babongo)• Indonesia Parliament drafting IP Law
  12. Email: vicky@tebtebba.orgWebsites:www.tebtebba.orgwww.indigenousclimate.orgTHANK YOU!DAKKEL AY IYAMAN!

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