The
New
Meaning
of

 Educa2onal
Change

              Fourth
Edi+on



         By
Michael
Fullan




Chapters
9
&
10

   ...
The
Power
of
Three

   Teachers/Administrators
                         

          Students
                 

     Paren...
Riding
the
Mobius
Strip

Begin
with
a
1
½
inch
strip.

Write


    Teachers/
 Administrators
 

on
one
side
of
the

      strip.
           

Write


    Students/Parent

      Communi+es  

on
the
other
side
of
the

         strip.
              

Tape
your
strip
in
a
loop.





   Educational Innovation:
A People Related Phenomenon
Students
are
the
poten2al

 beneficiaries
of
change.

We
rarely
think
of
students
as

  par2cipants
in
a
process
of

change
and
organiza2onal
life.

Attitudes
                       Skills



                       Jobs


 Achievement Results
LiOle
progress
has
been
made.





Unless they have meaning, most
  Educational change will fail.
Engagement
is
the
key
word.
                              

•  If
meaning
maOers
to
the
success
of
teachers

   and
princi...
Bring
the
outside,
in.

What Does Fullan
Say About Students
       and
     Educational
     Change?
“Innovations and their
inherent conflicts often
become ends in
themselves, and
students get thoroughly
lost in the
shuffle...
Goodland
(1984)
states…

•  Increasingly
less
use
of
teacher
praise

   and
support
for
learning,
less
correc2ve

   guida...
Sarason
(1982)
says…

•  It
appears
that
children
know
rela2vely

   liOle
about
how
a
teacher
thinks
about

   the
classr...
Dryeden
(1995)
emphasizes…

•  Students
oaen
are
disengaged
from
their
own

   learning,
and
it
is
enormously
difficult
for
...
Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as

               Perceived
by
Students.

              Rudduck,
Chaplain,...
Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as
Perceived

                       by
Students.

           Rudduck,
Chap...
Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as
Perceived

                       by
Students.

           Rudduck,
Chap...
Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as
Perceived

                       by
Students.

           Rudduck,
Chap...
Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as
Perceived

                       by
Students.

           Rudduck,
Chap...
Parent
Community
Involvement

Bring
the
outside,
in.

Fullan
and
Hargreaves
(1998)
state
in

What’s
Worth
Figh+ng
for
Out
There…

•  The
“out‐there”
is
now








   “in‐here....

Fullan’s
reason
as
to
why
school
boundaries
have

  become
more
permeable
and
transparent:




•  Inevitable:
Increase
ac...

Fullan
and
Hargreaves
conclude
‘if
the
‘out‐
 there’
is
going
to
get
you
anyway
on
its
terms,

 why
not
move
toward
the
d...
Reflect
on
your
own
work
sites:

•  Does
a
deliberate
and
effec2ve
collabora2on

   exist
in
your
school/community
partnersh...




“This
process
is
far
more
dangerous
journey
at

    the
outset
(when
you
are
working
from
a
base

    of
mutual
ignora...
Parent
Involvement
in
Schools






The
collabora2ve
efforts
and
rela2onships

    among
parents,
communi2es,
and
their

  ...





Henry’s
(1996)
study
on
parent‐school
collabora2on
in
low‐
     come
communi2es
concluded
that:




•  Educators
must...
•  Fullan
argues
that
in
order
to
accomplish
the

   above
it
will
‘involve
shias
in
power
and

   influence’
(p.
190).


•...



To
be
clear
on
power
within
this
par+cular

   context:



•  ‘to
seek
power
is
to
raise
and
begin
to
answer

   the
qu...
•  Fullan
poses
the
ques2on,
“What
will
it
take
to

   mobilize
more
people
and
resources
in
the

   service
of
educa2ng
a...
•  What
are
teachers
‘beliefs
about
parental

   involvement,
student
capabili2es,
and
the

   importance
of
deliberate
te...
•  For
students,
“communica2on
with
parents

   about
school,
confidence
in
the
ability
to
do

   the
work,
valuing
school
...



For
parents,
“valuing
school,
an
‘invita2onal’

   teacher
ahtude,
and
communica2ng
with

   students
about
school”
(p....
Parent
Involvement
in
Schools
                                 

•  The
rela2onship
between
parents,
communi2es,
and
schoo...
Parent
Involvement
in
Schools
                                

Effec2ve
Schools
(“moving”)
             Less
Effec2ve
Schoo...
Remove
the
tape
from
your
strip

and
create
a
mobius
strip
like
this:

How can we continue to move toward each
other?
Whose
school
is
it
anyway?

                          

      –
Gold
and
Miles
(1981)
                            

Poten2al
for
the
Power
of
Three

Draw
a
con2nuous
line.
                        





What do you think might happen if we were
          to cut along this...
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Mobius Change

  1. 1. The
New
Meaning
of
 Educa2onal
Change
 Fourth
Edi+on
 By
Michael
Fullan
 Chapters
9
&
10
 Taryl
Hargens
 Marcos
Hernandez
 Susan
Pederson
 Maria
Paredes

  2. 2. The
Power
of
Three
 Teachers/Administrators 
 Students 
 Parent
Community 

  3. 3. Riding
the
Mobius
Strip

  4. 4. Begin
with
a
1
½
inch
strip.

  5. 5. Write

 Teachers/ Administrators
 
 on
one
side
of
the
 strip. 

  6. 6. Write

 Students/Parent
 Communi+es 
 on
the
other
side
of
the
 strip. 

  7. 7. Tape
your
strip
in
a
loop.
 Educational Innovation: A People Related Phenomenon
  8. 8. Students
are
the
poten2al
 beneficiaries
of
change.

  9. 9. We
rarely
think
of
students
as
 par2cipants
in
a
process
of
 change
and
organiza2onal
life.

  10. 10. Attitudes Skills Jobs Achievement Results
  11. 11. LiOle
progress
has
been
made.
 Unless they have meaning, most Educational change will fail.
  12. 12. Engagement
is
the
key
word. 
 •  If
meaning
maOers
to
the
success
of
teachers
 and
principals…
 •  …meaning
is
central
to
student
success.

  13. 13. Bring
the
outside,
in.

  14. 14. What Does Fullan Say About Students and Educational Change?
  15. 15. “Innovations and their inherent conflicts often become ends in themselves, and students get thoroughly lost in the shuffle” (Fullan,2007).
  16. 16. Goodland
(1984)
states…
 •  Increasingly
less
use
of
teacher
praise
 and
support
for
learning,
less
correc2ve
 guidance,
a
narrowing
range
and
variety
 of
pedagogical
techniques,
and
declining
 par2cipa2on
by
students
in
determining
 the
daily
conduct
of
their
educa2on.
See
 a
decline
from
lower
to
upper
grades
in
 teachers’
support
of
students
as
persons
 and
learners
(Fullan,
2007,
p.
126).

  17. 17. Sarason
(1982)
says…
 •  It
appears
that
children
know
rela2vely
 liOle
about
how
a
teacher
thinks
about
 the
classroom,
what
he
takes
into
 account,
the
alterna2ves
he

thinks
 about,
the
things
that
puzzle
him
about
 children
and
about
learning,
what
he
 does
when
he
isn’t
sure
of
what
he
 should
do,
how
he
feels
when
he
does
 something
wrong”
(Fullan,
2007,
p.
185).

  18. 18. Dryeden
(1995)
emphasizes…
 •  Students
oaen
are
disengaged
from
their
own
 learning,
and
it
is
enormously
difficult
for
 teachers
to
enter
their
world.
Many
teachers
 end
up
teaching
the
“the
front
row”,
reaching
 10
or
fewer
students
in
a
class
of
30.

  19. 19. Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as
 Perceived
by
Students.
 Rudduck,
Chaplain,,
and
Wallace
(1996)
 Percep+ons
of
Themselves

 •  Have
lower
self‐concepts
 •  Characteris2cs
that
tend
to
make
it
difficult
 to
achieve
academically
 •  Fed
up
with
school

  20. 20. Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as
Perceived
 by
Students.
 Rudduck,
Chaplain,,
and
Wallace
(1996)
 Percep+on
of
school
work
 •  Homework’s
difficult
 •  Dislike
subjects
with
a
high
propor2on
of
 wri2ng
or
do
not
understand
 •  Increased
anxiety
about
their
abili2es
as
 they
near
exams

  21. 21. Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as
Perceived
 by
Students.
 Rudduck,
Chaplain,,
and
Wallace
(1996)
 Rela+onship
with
peers
 •  More
likely
to
have
been
involved
in
bullying
 incidents
 •  Feel
under
pressure
from
their
immediate
 friends
if
they
exhibit
academic
behaviors
 •  Pg.
178‐179

  22. 22. Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as
Perceived
 by
Students.
 Rudduck,
Chaplain,,
and
Wallace
(1996)
 Rela+onship
with
teachers
 •  Perceive
teachers
as
unfair,
par2cularly
 unfair
to
them
 •  Believes
teachers
express
nega2ve
behaviors
 toward
them
both
verbally
and
non‐verbally
 •  Would
like
a
teacher
they
could
trust
to
talk
 things
through
 •  Consider
teachers
to
be
largely
responsible
 for
their
failure
at
school

  23. 23. Summaries
of
the
Consequences
of
Disengagement
as
Perceived
 by
Students.
 Rudduck,
Chaplain,,
and
Wallace
(1996)
 Percep+ons
of
the
future
 •  Show
high
levels
of
anxiety
about
their
 future
chances
in
the
working
world
 •  Despite
nega2ve
messages
from
the
school
 want
to
persists
and
have
some
examina2on
 success
 •  See
a
district
rela2onship
between
 examina2on
success
and
gehng
a
job
 •  Are
more
likely
to
plan
to
get
a
job
at
15

  24. 24. Parent
Community
Involvement

  25. 25. Bring
the
outside,
in.

  26. 26. Fullan
and
Hargreaves
(1998)
state
in
 What’s
Worth
Figh+ng
for
Out
There…
 •  The
“out‐there”
is
now







 “in‐here.”
 •  He
observed
that
the
 boundaries
of
the
school
 are
now

more
permeable
 and
more
transparent,
and
 that
this
development
was
 both
inevitable
and
 desirable.

  27. 27. 
Fullan’s
reason
as
to
why
school
boundaries
have
 become
more
permeable
and
transparent:

 •  Inevitable:
Increase
accountability
of
schools
 and
the
accessibility
and
prolifera2on
of
 technology
in
our
society
 •  Desirable:
In
a
postmodern
society,
desirable
 outcomes
in
educa2on
can
not
be
met
 without
collabora2on

  28. 28. 
Fullan
and
Hargreaves
conclude
‘if
the
‘out‐ there’
is
going
to
get
you
anyway
on
its
terms,
 why
not
move
toward
the
danger,
and
have
a
 chance
of
gehng
some
of
it
on
your
 terms.”
(p.
188).


  29. 29. Reflect
on
your
own
work
sites:
 •  Does
a
deliberate
and
effec2ve
collabora2on
 exist
in
your
school/community
partnership
 that
sustains
educa2onal
issues
in
your
site?
 •  Does
one
even
exist?
 •  If
one
does
exist,
is
there
a
‘shared‐ governance’
that
deeply
involves
and
engages
 the
community
in
the
decision‐making
process
 on
educa2onal
issues?

  30. 30. 



“This
process
is
far
more
dangerous
journey
at
 the
outset
(when
you
are
working
from
a
base
 of
mutual
ignorance)
than
it
is
once
you
are
 underway”
(Fullan,
2006,
p.
188).

  31. 31. Parent
Involvement
in
Schools
 



The
collabora2ve
efforts
and
rela2onships
 among
parents,
communi2es,
and
their
 schools
are
in
‘disrepair
and
in
need
of
social
 reconstruc2on’
(p.
190).


  32. 32. 




Henry’s
(1996)
study
on
parent‐school
collabora2on
in
low‐ come
communi2es
concluded
that:

 •  Educators
must
engage
their
communi2es
 with
empathy
 •  Educators
must
interact
meaningfully
with
 their
cons2tuents
 •  Being
professional
can
no
longer
mean
 remaining
isolated
in
the
school

  33. 33. •  Fullan
argues
that
in
order
to
accomplish
the
 above
it
will
‘involve
shias
in
power
and
 influence’
(p.
190).
 •  The
shias
of
power
and
influence
are
among
 the
teachers
and
the
parents.

  34. 34. 


To
be
clear
on
power
within
this
par+cular
 context:

 •  ‘to
seek
power
is
to
raise
and
begin
to
answer
 the
ques2on:
to
seek
power
to
change
 what?...to
seek
power
without
asking
the
 “what”
ques2on
is
not
only
to
beg
the
 ques2on
but
to
avoid,
and
therefore
to
collude
 in
cosme2c
change’
(Fullan,
2006,
p.
190).

  35. 35. •  Fullan
poses
the
ques2on,
“What
will
it
take
to
 mobilize
more
people
and
resources
in
the
 service
of
educa2ng
all
students?”
(p.
190).
 •  Coleman’s
(1998)
power
of
three.


  36. 36. •  What
are
teachers
‘beliefs
about
parental
 involvement,
student
capabili2es,
and
the
 importance
of
deliberate
teaching
of
 responsibili2es
in
classrooms’
(p.
191)

  37. 37. •  For
students,
“communica2on
with
parents
 about
school,
confidence
in
the
ability
to
do
 the
work,
valuing
school
for
its
importance
to
 the
future,
and
collabora2on
with
 teachers”
(p.
191).


  38. 38. 


For
parents,
“valuing
school,
an
‘invita2onal’
 teacher
ahtude,
and
communica2ng
with
 students
about
school”
(p.
191).

  39. 39. Parent
Involvement
in
Schools 
 •  The
rela2onship
between
parents,
communi2es,
and
schools
is
 in
need
of
social
reconstruc2on
 •  Teachers
can
not
do
it
alone
 •  Parents
are
their
children’s
very
first
educators.
They
have
 knowledge
of
their
children
that
is
not
available
to
anyone
else
 •  Teachers
can
have
great
influence
over
“curriculum
of
the
 home”
 •  Student
commitment
can
be
sustained
through
collabora2on,
 and
teachers’
ahtudes
and
prac2ces
 •  It
is
only
when
the
majority
of
teachers
are
collabora2ng
with
 the
majority
of
parents
that
any
sizable
impact
on
student
 learning
will
occur


  40. 40. Parent
Involvement
in
Schools 
 Effec2ve
Schools
(“moving”)
 Less
Effec2ve
Schools
 •  Teachers
are
accessible
to
 (“stuck”)
 parents
 •  Teachers
hold
no
goals
for
 •  Teachers
involve
parents
with
 parent
involvement
 academic
content
 •  There
is
no
expecta2on
for
 •  Communica2on
with
parents
is
 collabora2on
between
parents
 professional,
direct,
and
valuing
 and
teachers
 •  Teachers
see
parents
as
part
of
 •  Teachers
assume
nothing
can
 the
solu2on
 be
done
with
parents
 •  There
is
respect
toward
parents
 •  Teachers
see
parents
as
part
of
 regardless
of
background
or
 the
problem
 educa2on
achievement
 •  Don’t
know
how
to
brake
the
 •  Schools
have
a
“client
 nega2ve
cycle
of
parent
 orienta2on”
 disengagement
 •  There
is
trust
between
the
 school
and
the
community

  41. 41. Remove
the
tape
from
your
strip
 and
create
a
mobius
strip
like
this:

  42. 42. How can we continue to move toward each other?
  43. 43. Whose
school
is
it
anyway?
 
 –
Gold
and
Miles
(1981) 

  44. 44. Poten2al
for
the
Power
of
Three

  45. 45. Draw
a
con2nuous
line. 
 What do you think might happen if we were to cut along this line?

×