I SM                            TIV                      U   C         S          TR  O    NC    R AC          IE         ...
CONSTRUCTIVISM MAIN MENU The theory The founders The classroom
THE THEORY Match teaching style to student’s learning style Learning is an active process of knowledge construction Inf...
HOW THE THEORY WORKS Learning is not the result of development; learning is development Teachers should thus allow learn...
THE FOUNDERS Jean Piaget Jerome Bruner Lev Vygotsky John Dewey
JEAN PIAGETChildren build knowledge based on what they already know during cognitive stages:Sensorimotor: senses and moto...
JEROME BRUNER Learner constructs new ideas based on past knowledge Learning is an active process Students learn best th...
LEV VYGOTSKY Social cognition: learning influenced by social development Zone of proximal development: difference betwee...
JOHN DEWEY Child centered instruction with school as a community School as an extension of society with children as acti...
THE CLASSROOM Shift from whole class to small group instruction Coach rather than lecture Keep students are more active...
THE CLASSROOM CON’T Actively engage students in discovery learning with Web Quests and  scavenger hunts Create discussio...
BIBLIOGRAPHYMatthews, William J. “Constructivism in the Classroom: Epistemology, History, and   Empirical Evidence”. Teach...
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Tracie H. Constructivism

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Tracie H. Constructivism

  1. 1. I SM TIV U C S TR O NC R AC IE H. T
  2. 2. CONSTRUCTIVISM MAIN MENU The theory The founders The classroom
  3. 3. THE THEORY Match teaching style to student’s learning style Learning is an active process of knowledge construction Influenced by how one interacts with and interprets new ideas Process of making sense of the world Social interaction plays a role in learning "If children work toward pleasing the teacher instead of satisfying their natural search for understanding, they will not progress toward intellectual autonomy“ -Waite-Stupiansky
  4. 4. HOW THE THEORY WORKS Learning is not the result of development; learning is development Teachers should thus allow learners to raise their own questions Students then generate their own hypotheses and models as possibilities Students can then test their ideas for viability
  5. 5. THE FOUNDERS Jean Piaget Jerome Bruner Lev Vygotsky John Dewey
  6. 6. JEAN PIAGETChildren build knowledge based on what they already know during cognitive stages:Sensorimotor: senses and motor actionsPreoperational: symbols and images; pretend gamesConcrete operational: logic; learn facts; understand other’s point of viewFormal operational: abstract; hypothesis and cause/effect relationships
  7. 7. JEROME BRUNER Learner constructs new ideas based on past knowledge Learning is an active process Students learn best through a variety of activities
  8. 8. LEV VYGOTSKY Social cognition: learning influenced by social development Zone of proximal development: difference between problem solving ability learned and the potential if collaborated with an advanced peer or expert Collaborative learning: working together with different perspectives creates deeper understanding
  9. 9. JOHN DEWEY Child centered instruction with school as a community School as an extension of society with children as active participants Created University Elementary School (Laboratory School) with student directed learning Progressive education: mentally, physically and socially
  10. 10. THE CLASSROOM Shift from whole class to small group instruction Coach rather than lecture Keep students are more actively engaged More cooperative and less competitive Integration of both visual and verbal thinking Pose questions that relate to real-life experiences and the community
  11. 11. THE CLASSROOM CON’T Actively engage students in discovery learning with Web Quests and scavenger hunts Create discussions using the Socratic method to analyze problems and think critically Build on what students already know through anchored instruction Use educational video games for problem solving and to simulate real life activities Have students take ownership of their own learning
  12. 12. BIBLIOGRAPHYMatthews, William J. “Constructivism in the Classroom: Epistemology, History, and Empirical Evidence”. Teacher Education Quarterly, Vol. 30, Issue 3. 2002. Education Full TextPowell, Katherine C. and Kalina, Cody J. “Cognitive and Social Constructivism: Developing Tools for an Effective Classroom”. Education. Vol. 130 Issue 2, p241-250. 2009. Education Full TextShelly, Gary B., Gunter, Glenda A. and Gunter, Randolph E. Teachers Discovering Computers. Boston: Cengage Learning. 2012. Print.Yilmaz, Kaya. “Constructivism: Its Theoretical Underpinnings, Variations, and Implications for Classroom Instruction”. Educational Horizons, Vol. 86, Issue 3. 2008. Education Full Text.

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