Mooc

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Mooc

  1. 1. M O O C ASSIVE PEN NLINE OURSE BY LEPING G.T 201225620
  2. 2. WHAT IS MOOC ? A massive open online course (MOOC) is a 20TH century model for delivering learning content online to any person who wants to take a course, with no limit on attendance.
  3. 3. THANKS TO MOOC I CAN STUDY ANYWHRE
  4. 4. HISTORY OF MOOCs  The first MOOCs emerged from the open educational resources (OER) movement. Open Educational Resources (OER) are freely accessible, openly licensed documents and media that are useful for teaching, learning, educational, assessment and research purposes.  The term MOOC was coined in 2008 by Dave Cormier of the University of Prince Edward Island.  And Senior Research Fellow Bryan Alexander of the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education.
  5. 5. continues…..  In response to a course called Connectivism and Connective Knowledge (also known as CCK08).  It was called „Connectivism and Connective Knowledge/2008‟ (CCK8), created by educators Stephen Downes and George Siemens.  Building off a for-credit course at the University of Manitoba, Canada, this was the first class designed behind the acronym of „MOOC‟ and used many different platforms to engage students with the topic, including Facebook groups, Wiki pages, blogs, forums and other resources.
  6. 6. Continues….  Around 2,200 people signed up for CCK08, and 170 of them created their own blogs.  The course was free and open, which meant that anyone could join, modify or remix the content without paying (although a paid, certified option was offered.  In 2012, another MOOC experiment caught academics‟ attention.  Two Stanford Professors Sebastian Thrun and Peter Norvig decided to offer “Introduction to Artificial Intelligence” for free online.
  7. 7. Continues……  Designed to resemble real classroom experiences and offer high-quality classes for everyone, the idea had the advantage of carrying the prestigious Stanford name .  More than 160,000 students in 190 countries signed up, and for the first time, an open online course was truly „massive‟. This led Thrun and Norvig to build a new business model for online knowledge.
  8. 8. DIFFERENT TYPES OF MOOCs
  9. 9. XMOOCs  focuses mostly on instructivist approaches to teaching.  The instructor, along with a support team, record and serve video lectures to learners.  Things that the learners learned, are then practiced through formative testing.  assessed in some sort of graded activity
  10. 10. CMOOCs  Tend to focus on constructivist and connectivist approaches to learning.  Learning happens when students interact with authentic materials.  Learner centred.
  11. 11. MY FIELD OF INTEREST LIFE SCIENCES
  12. 12. TOPICS
  13. 13. List of References  Bell, F. (2011) Connectivism: Its Place in Theory-Informed Research and Innovation in Technolgy-Enabled Learning. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning. Volume 12, Number 3. Retrievable from web http://www.irrodl.org/index.php/irrodl/article/view/902/1664 (accessed 22 February 2014).  Cormier D, Siemens G (2010) Through the open door: open courses as research, learning, and engagement. EDUCAUSE Review; 2010; 45(4): 30-9. http://www.ispub.com/journal/the_internet_journal_of_medical_education/ volume_1_number_2_71/article/a-brief-guide-to-understanding-moocs.html (accessed 22 February 2014)

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