VICTORIAN HATSHats were popular throughout the Victorian period.They were worn much more than they are today. Bothchildren...
Men’s Hats                             The top hat (a tall silk hat)                             was generally       worn ...
"Mad as a hatter"The Hatter is a character in the story of Alices Adventures inWonderland, written in 1865 by Lewis Carrol...
Women’s HatsIn the 1860s, the mainheadwear for women wasthe bonnet. The sunbonnetwas made from differentfabrics       prot...
Links to the River Thames and Trade      “Such feathers as those shown above, may well have a   fascination for all womank...
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Victorian Hats

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Information produced by the Thames Discovery Programme for a family event at the RSPB Rainham Marshes, June 2011

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Transcript of "Victorian Hats"

  1. 1. VICTORIAN HATSHats were popular throughout the Victorian period.They were worn much more than they are today. Bothchildren and adults wore a variety of hats and caps. Hats were worn for all sorts of occasions such as: 1) To indicate a person’s job or as part of a uniform 2) For wearing when in town, or in the country 3) To indicate the status or importance of a person. In Victorian times it was much easier than today to tell from a person’s dress how much they earned, what they did for a living or where they came from. Practical concerns did influence hat design, however, in the later years, the hats became a symbol of style statement and authority. The kind of hats worn by women and men were different. Images from http://www.graphicsfairy.blogspot.com/
  2. 2. Men’s Hats The top hat (a tall silk hat) was generally worn for formal day and evening wear. A light grey top hat was worn in the 1860s for racing parties. In the 1870s, there was a rise in the number of hats that were considered appropriate for informal wear. The wide-awake, a broad-brimmed felt hat with a low crown was popular as acountryman’s hat. Caps of firmly woven wool which wereclose-fitting were also worn by the Victorian men. Isambard Kingdom Brunel
  3. 3. "Mad as a hatter"The Hatter is a character in the story of Alices Adventures inWonderland, written in 1865 by Lewis Carroll, who first appearsin Chapter 7 "A Mad Tea Party". The phrase "mad as a hatter" wascommon at the time and had been in use since 1837. In 18th and19th century England mercury was used in the production offelt, which was used in the manufacturing of hats. People whoworked in these hat factories were exposed daily to traceamounts of the metal, which accumulated within their bodiesover time, causing some workers to develop dementia caused bymercury poisoning. So the phrase "Mad as a Hatter" becamepopular as a way to refer to someone who was seen as insane.http://www.exit109.com/~dnn/alice/rackham/rack8.jpghttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mad_as_a_hatter
  4. 4. Women’s HatsIn the 1860s, the mainheadwear for women wasthe bonnet. The sunbonnetwas made from differentfabrics protected awoman’s face and neck.Hats were also used byyoung women and girls.Most of the hats used weretrimmed with ribbons,Feathers, flowers and attimes, veils.Hats formed an essentialpart of a woman’s appareland as a result, they wouldalways wear a hat whenthey went out. The hatswere layered on a wirebase covered with strawbraids or twisted fabric and was made from velvet,satin, cotton and tulle fabrics. Birds were used as decorating piece on the hats and this was a fashion in the last half of the 19th century. The hats were ornamented by bird parts like their wings, breasts or at times the whole bird was used. The Brazilian blackbird was in demand for becoming a showpiece on the hat. http://www.victorian-era.org/victorian-era- costume-hats.html Images from http://www.graphicsfairy.blogspot.com/
  5. 5. Links to the River Thames and Trade “Such feathers as those shown above, may well have a fascination for all womankind, from a duchess to a costers sweetheart”.A good idea of the way in which ostrich feathers werestored is gained from this viewof a room in the Cutler StreetWarehouses, which were theproperty of the London and St.Katherines Docks Company. Inthese warehouses, whichcovered four acres and had afloor area of 630,000 feet, tea,silk, cochineal, carpets andpiece goods were stored inaddition to ostrich feathers ofgreat value. Cutler Street is in Houndsditch, withineasy access of London and St. Katherines Docks.http://www.victorianlondon.org/ql/queenslondon325.htm

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