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Closingthedeal Closingthedeal Document Transcript

  • Closing The Deal “Closing The Deal” covers everything you need to know, after you’ve had a job offer. It guides you from deciding whether or not to accept, through negotiating your salary and quitting your old job with dignity. © Clare Jaques 2003 - 2006 All rights reserved. You may circulate this book, free of charge, to friends, family and work colleagues, as long as you do not edit it in any way. All contents remain copyright of Clare Jaques and Interview Stuff.
  • Table Of Contents ---------- 1 Introduction ------- ---------- 8 Settling In ------- Introduction The First Few Days The 5 sections of this guide .........................4 How to settle in well................................... 38 ---------- 2 Should I Say Yes? ------- ---------- Extra Resources ------- Should I Take The Job? Want To Know More? Not such a stupid question!..........................6 Make the most of these free resources..... 41 --------- 3 I've Still Got Questions ------ ---------- 9 Exercise Templates ------- I’ve Still Got Questions Exercise templates 42 Need to know more?..................................14 ---------- 4 My Ideal Package ------- What’s My Ideal Package? How to negotiate your salary and perks ....17 Exercise Exercise 6: My ideal package ....................18 It’s up to you whether you work through this e- book in sequence or just pick the exercises that seem most relevant to you. ---------- 5 Salary Negotiation ------- Salary Negotiation Bear in mind that some of the exercises build How do I negotiate a better package? .......20 on previous topics, so you may need to go back and do some background thinking. ---------- 6 When Should I Start? ------- When Should I Start? The instructions make it clear where this is the How to get the start date you want ............28 case Reviewing The Contract Make sure you read it carefully ..................30 ---------- 7 How To Quit ------- How To Quit My Current Job Handing in your notice without burning your bridges .......................................................35 © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 2 Closing The Deal
  • 1 Introduction The 5 sections of this guide © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 3 Closing The Deal
  • Deciding Whether To Accept 1 Just because you’ve been offered a job Introduction doesn’t mean you should go for it. Making The 5 sections of this guide an objective decisions pays dividends and means you won’t be job-hunting again in six months’ time. Putting Together Your Ideal Package It’s easy to miss something out, when negotiating a salary package. Usually employers have salary and benefits You’ve made it through the recruitment guidelines within which they can operate. process and now you’ve had a job offer. But you’d be surprised how flexible things Congratulations! might be, if you’re a smart negotiator. But before you rush to say “yes”, it’s worth Negotiating A Start Date taking a few moments to think about how Your future employer will usually want you you’re going to negotiate your package and to start “yesterday”. But, to be honest, an start date. extra week or two is unlikely to make a huge difference. Think about when you’d like to move and whether you’d like a Research has shown that it’s week or two off between jobs. much easier to get a pay rise when you change jobs, rather than getting promoted within your Quitting Your Current Job current role. This can actually be quite stressful,. It certainly isn’t recommended to march into your boss’s office with your resignation, At the same time, the recruiter will want to get based on a telephone offer. Your the right person, but for as little outlay as employer’s reaction can vary from trying possible. So you need to do some clever to keep you (which can really drag things negotiating. out) to escorting you off site! The good news is that getting closer to your Settling In ideal package is quite straightforward, as long as you’ve done your homework. The first few days in a new job can be daunting and exciting. This section includes some top tips for making sure Closing The Deal takes you through a nerves don’t get in the way and you make structured process of deciding whether to a great first impression. accept the job, negotiating a package, agreeing a start date and quitting your current job. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 4 Closing The Deal
  • 2 Should I Take The Job? Not such a stupid question! © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 5 Closing The Deal
  • The first stage is to think about your current 2 role. This helps you work out whether the new Should I Take The Job? job will fix the problems with the old one. Not such a stupid question! Sometimes it’s easy to get carried away with the excitement of being offered Exercise 1: Evaluate your current role a job, that we don’t stop to Take a minute or two to think about your think about whether we current or most recent role. really want it. How would you describe it? After all, we’ve been through the interviews What do you like about it? Which aspects you and had the offer. Why wouldn’t we want it? won’t miss? Be as specific as you can, because this will Well, it’s time for a sanity check. help you start to gain an insight into what is motivating you. Think about your current role. What would you miss about it? It will help you find a new job that builds on the good features of your last role, but avoids the bad bits. Does what the new job has to offer make up for that? (An example is on the next page) Can you imagine yourself working in the new company in 3 / 5 / 10 years’ time? The following exercises help you objectively make the decision. Even if you’re pretty sure it’s a “yes”, it’s worth going through them, to see if there’s anything you want to add to your negotiation framework. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 6 Closing The Deal
  • Click here for a blank form My current / most recent role is: Example - Emma was fired from her recent temping job. Temping for Mr. Hargreaves. Made it through 4½ months of a 6 month maternity cover contract. Responsible for all sorts of stuff that just didn’t rock my boat. Good luck to the new girl. I like… Be honest with yourself. Even if things aren’t so well any more, there must still be something you like! Like? Are you kidding? Ok, let’s take this seriously. I did like the fact it was close to the shops. And there was free mineral water and coffee. And I was paid quite well, for what I did. And I guess that the company was quite ethical, it was mainly the work I didn’t like, rather than the people. I won’t miss…Be objective and specific. Objective? Guess that means no emotions. It was too much detail. I just got bored – it wasn’t me. What else? Well, I guess I didn’t really know what I was doing. And everyone assumed I did, so I kept getting it wrong. Maybe they should have had some training, or something? And I would rather have worked with lots of younger people. Most of the people in the company were much older than me – the majority had kids my age. Nothing wrong with that; just not for me right now. What is motivating me to change? (Be honest!) Duh! I was fired! Yeah, but I wasn’t really happy anyway. Right, I want a permanent job, where I can settle in and actually make friends. And get some training and development. And eventually more responsibility. And finally… Is there anything my current employer could do, to make me want to stay? Well, they put a stop to that. But seriously, I don’t think so. Even if they’d given me more responsibility and made me permanent, I think I’d have wanted to work with a company with a more dynamic outlook. I felt like I was being treated like a kid, which is what I was in most people’s eyes. How did you respond to the final question? Is there anything your current employer could do to make you want to stay? Is that what you want? Are you moving for the right reasons? © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 7 Closing The Deal
  • Exercise 2: Four Questions That Can Make Your Head Spin The next four questions can really help clarify whether you should move to the job you’ve just been offered. They’re specially designed to help you cut past your rational thinking and get to what’s going on underneath. So if they make your head spin, that’s ok. Persevere with them and write down your answers, no matter how odd they seem. Click here for a blank form What will happen if you do accept the job offer? Let’s take Jude’s example – returning to work after 7 years of raising a family. I’ll be back in the marketing game, refreshing my skills and meeting new people. What will happen if you don’t accept the job offer? I’ll still be at home all day, looking after the house, and wondering what would have happened, had I gone back to work. I will eventually find it’s too late to go back. What won’t happen if you do accept the job offer? I won’t get to pick the kids up from school. I won’t have time to do the housework I currently do, which might make things a bit more stressful. I won’t be able to look after the kids, if they’re ill. What won’t happen if you don’t accept the job offer? I won’t regain my independence. I love being a mum, but I really want to go back to having a career, too, even if it’s on a different scale. I won’t have the stress of commuting, but I wouldn’t be earning money, either. I won’t be able to use my brain as much as I’d like to. Has this exercise helped you clear things up? © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 8 Closing The Deal
  • Exercise 3: Deciding Whether To Accept This exercise helps you work out what would be important to you in your ideal job. You may have considered this already, or this may be the first time you’ve thought about it. The key is to check whether the job you’ve been offered is closer to your ideal job than your current role, or further away. Being objective, how well does your potential new job meet your criteria? Click here for a blank form Step 1 Write a paragraph describing your next, ideal job. What will your team be like? What role will you play? What will your rewards be? What will you see? What will you hear? What will you feel? These last 3 questions might seem a bit strange, but they’re highly effective for clarifying your thoughts. Make sure you really get into the frame of mind you’d be in if you had the job. Let’s follow Jude for this example. What will my team be like? At least 20 of us – big enough to get the job done – not just 2 or 3 people in a tiny company. With 20 there’ll be plenty of opportunity for socialising, but there aren’t so many people that you get lost in anonymity. What role will I play? I’d like to do something that involves working with the media agencies and advertising teams. Not too much pressure. Probably a Brand Manager role, so I’m responsible for decisions and strategy, but without having to manage too many people. Exercise continues on next page… © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 9 Closing The Deal
  • What will your rewards be? Good pay and possibly bonus scheme. I guess my preferred reward would actually be recognition for my achievements. What will I see? Hmm… Not sure I understand this one. Ok, let’s give it a go. I’ll see smart, bright, airy modern offices; fairly open plan; lots of people smiling; clutter-free environment What will I hear? Phones ringing; people laughing; keyboards typing; coffee machine spluttering away What will I feel? Well, I’d like to feel confident and self-assured. I’d like to feel relaxed, but slightly excited. So probably enough of a challenge that I have to think, but not so much that I stress about it. Step 2 Pull out the key elements from Step 1. They might include: Whether you want to manage direct reports The size of team you want to manage (or not) Working hours, flexitime Level of responsibility Working environment Training Basic salary range Paid overtime Other benefits Holiday entitlement Career opportunities Location Amount of travelling Which of your key skills you most want to use / develop Which of your main values should be met Exercise continues on next page… © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 10 Closing The Deal
  • Then split them into one of three categories: Essential These are things that are so important to you that you next job must deliver them. Without these, you would reject a job offer. These items effectively provide your worst case scenario, when deciding whether to accept a job and negotiating a salary. Be careful not to put too many things in this category, or you’ll notice you find it really hard to get a job that meets your requirements. Important Important, but negotiable. These are things that you want, but would be prepared to sacrifice, if you had to. Nice to have The icing on the cake. These are things that would be a real bonus for you – they might make the critical difference between two jobs. When you’re deciding whether to accept a job offer, beware choosing your “nice to have” items instead of your “important” items. The nice to have section is really about things you’d like to aim for, but wouldn’t miss too much, if you didn’t get them. Essential Important, but negotiable Nice to have Managing a team of 2+ Ability to take unpaid leave if Health insurance children are ill Bright, airy office with good Flexible working hours Company car parking & access to healthy lunches Other mothers in the team – Support next level of study Option to work 4 days a so people understand the for Chartered Institute of week challenges Marketing Salary enough to cover at Minimal international travel Time off in lieu for overtime least twice the cost of childcare, to make it worth working Responsible for decisions on Good pension scheme Bonus scheme a minor brand Responsible for sign-off of all Opportunity to use my foreign Company-organised social aspects of the advertising languages events for teams & their campaigns partners Recognition of achievements Annual pay review scheme Flowers and plants in the – formal scheme offices The most important column is “essential”. You should check the job you have been offered against this list. What you are saying with these items is that, if the job doesn’t offer these (or equivalent), then you will reject it. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 11 Closing The Deal
  • Exercise 4: Visualisation So where are you now? And finally… Definitely accept it You’re pretty sure you want to Probably accept it accept or decline the job offer. Probably reject it Spending five minutes on this Definitely reject it visualisation helps you work out the longer-term consequences Really can’t decide of your choice. 1. Imagine you accepted the offer of a job, which fulfilled your “essential” criteria, but few of your “important” ones and none of the “nice to haves”. Then pretend you could float 5 years into the future. What is your life like? What would you see? What would you hear? What would you feel? 2. Is that what you really want? 3. If not, what would have to change, for your future to be what you want? 4. Go back and make the necessary changes to the table in exercise 6. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 12 Closing The Deal
  • 3 I’ve Still Got Questions Need to know more, before you can make a decision? © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 13 Closing The Deal
  • Nice to know I’ve Still Got Questions Need to know more? 3 What’s the canteen like? Do they have a Christmas party? (Again, checking attitude) If there are still things you want to know about the company, before you make a decision, you owe it to Do you really need to know all this? yourself to get answers. Sometimes we put obstacles and extra Exercise 5: What information do I still need, requirements in the way, to avoid having to to help me make my decision? make difficult decisions. Click here for a blank form So before you spend time, finding out what you want to know, just double-check whether Critical you’re using it as a means to procrastinate. Let’s continue with Jude’s example: Once you’ve done that, revisit your answers to Do they offer flexitime? Is it something I could exercise 5 and highlight the bits you really negotiate? want to know. Ideally, I don’t want to work their hours of 9 to 5:30. My youngest would be in bed before I got home, if I had to work overtime. I’d rather do 8 to 4:30. Can I change that? There are many ways to find out the information you need. Useful Sometimes you can do “desk research”, which means looking on the internet or in magazines, Do they have plans to open a crèche in the to find out the information “second hand”. future? How many of the employees are parents? (Checking potential attitude to family Or you can do “primary research”, which commitments) means going and asking the questions yourself: maybe to the person who offered you the job, the HR team, the recruitment agency or people you met on your interviews. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 14 Closing The Deal
  • Whichever option you choose, researching the company is covered in much more detail in The Interview’s Looming. Use the space below to make notes from your findings. End of exercise © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 15 Closing The Deal
  • 4 What’s My Ideal Package? How to negotiate your salary and job perks. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 16 Closing The Deal
  • certain time period. Car allowance (with or without fuel). Note: this What’s My Ideal 4 can hit your tax bill. Package? How to negotiate your Bonus scheme salary and perks Employee discounts Working from home Flexitime Paid overtime / time off in lieu You may be perfectly happy Pay reviews. Note: if you negotiate a higher with the job offer you’ve salary, they may not give you an increase at been made. And that’s fine. the next pay review. However, it’s still worth checking it against your Be careful about checking the policy for sick current total package, pay and maternity / paternity leave, before you because it’s easy to overlook have a written contract. It may make the something and suddenly realise you’re not employer nervous! See When Should I Start? getting the deal you thought. for more information. Bear in mind that a job offer package may Before you negotiate, you should note the include many things, other than salary. following: • Research your expectations, to make sure To help you work out your ideal package and they’re realistic for the industry, the create a strong negotiating position, fill in the company you’ll work for and their table in Exercise 6. geographic location. • Justify why your new role deserves more remuneration. 10% is a typical maximum Bear in mind that a “package” may include any increase in base salary, but there are plenty of the following – and more. Some items will of other areas you can negotiate. be company policy – set in stone; others may be more flexible. • Minimum: be clear about the minimum you’d settle for and why. Be prepared to walk away. Basic salary • Don’t suddenly increase your expectations Percentage pension contribution from the from anything discussed during the employer recruitment process. Number of days of vacation Relocation allowance (e.g. solicitor’s fees, estate agent’s fees, stamp duty, moving costs, temporary accommodation, allowance for carpets & curtains, etc.). Note: you may be required to repay these, if you leave within a © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 17 Closing The Deal
  • Exercise 6: My ideal package 3-5 reasons why I’m worth the package I’m asking for. (If you can’t answer this, you’ll feel weaker, when negotiating). What were your “essential” items from Exercise 3? Can you put numbers against them? Exercise continues on next page… © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 18 Closing The Deal
  • What were your “important” items from Exercise 3? Can you put numbers against them? Salary and benefits package – current Salary and benefits package – desired Best case Worst case Time to go and negotiate! © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 19 Closing The Deal
  • affair and may be relatively small. This is your chance to take a step up. Salary Negotiation How do I negotiate a better package? So before you accept, it’s worth taking a step back, to let the excitement die down a bit first. When you accept a job offer, that’s when Congratulations! You’ve had the job offer and your bargaining power ends. So it’s you want to accept! All that hard work has paid important to make sure you have done off. whatever you need to, to ensure you’re getting a fair deal. Hopefully you did your homework before your job interview and have checked the salary So one of the first things you should do is range for the job fits with your expectations? revisit Exercise 3: Deciding Whether To Accept. Remember? The exercise where you worked out what was essential for you and We’re going to assume a “yes” to that one! what was negotiable? Many people don’t bother By being clear about this, it puts you in a much negotiating their starting salary, stronger position for negotiation. simply accepting the company’s first offer. But this is a real waste. The key to good negotiation is knowing where you’ll quit, and Employers usually understand that they have being prepared to do so. to pay the going rate to get the right candidate. However, often their budgets mean they’ll try to recruit you at the most affordable rate. What you’re effectively saying is that, if the company can’t meet your essential list, you’ll walk away from the job offer. Your agenda, conversely, might be to get a pay rise or increase in benefits from your promotion or job move. This is what gives you your bargaining power. This means that you have to work to find a win-win solution. Once you work for the company, salary and benefit reviews tend to become an annual © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 20 Closing The Deal
  • So here are the top tips for win-win salary Exercise 7 helps you prepare for this call – you negotiation: only get one chance to get it right. 1. Understand what's important to you Recruiters are used to people negotiating so, about the job. as long as you're realistic and polite, and can justify your requests, then it's likely to be a win- You have completed exercises to help you win outcome. clarify this. It will help you decide how far you're prepared to compromise. Remember that salary and package are about more than just cash. 2. What's your current package? You can negotiate on, for example, monthly Include salary, bonuses, perks such as salary, bonuses, car allowance, pension health care, paid overtime, relocation contributions, healthcare contributions, number allowance, company car and holiday of days' vacation or even future salary review entitlement… dates. See the answers you gave in the last section. Bear in mind that some companies have fixed policies about benefits, depending on the 3. What is your "best case" package? seniority of the position. This can make Keep it realistic, but optimistic. What would negotiation tricky, as the recruiter may have you really like as a package? little say over the package. 4. What is your "minimum offer" position? If this is the case, simply ask them where they could be flexible - and negotiate from there. ... below which you will reject the job offer? Be prepared to reject the job offer, if the Once you know this, the salary negotiation call package doesn't meet your minimum is simple. requirements. If you're feeling nervous, then practise with a friend or family member first. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 21 Closing The Deal
  • -------------------- TOP TIP -------------------- Exercise 7: Phoning the recruiter: salary negotiation Get the complete job offer and contract in writing before giving anything other than a conditional acceptance. Before you pick up the phone, do some quick -------------------- TOP TIP -------------------- preparation. Unfortunately, we sometimes come across You’ll only get one chance to get candidates who were offered salaries and this call right. If you go through this perks "at the end of the trial period", but never exercise, you’ll increase your got written confirmation and - surprise, surprise chances of getting the salary and - they never materialised. package you want! Often promises of big rises "at the next review" It’s usually best to call the relevant member of aren't delivered - sometimes because the the company’s Human Resources team, "promiser" has left the company and no record unless you have been told otherwise. The was made of the offer. recruiting manager tends not to handle the legal side of recruitment, once a job offer has been made. We're not suggesting you be cynical; simply reminding you that this is a business negotiation. If you have been offered the job verbally, during a phone call, it’s perfectly ok to tell them that you’re very interested, but would like 24 You owe it to yourself to deal with it hours (or a few days) to make a decision. This professionally, which means getting your terms buys you time to negotiate your package. and conditions in a written contract, before you quit your current job. Whatever you do, try not to accept there an then, or it greatly reduces your negotiation power. Exercise continues on next page… © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 22 Closing The Deal
  • Before dialling: you start a week or two later than they want. • Work out your current salary and benefits package and what range you are looking for. In detail! Use Exercise 6 to help you do this. Unless you’ve already handed in your notice (bad idea before getting a written job offer and • Note down any other questions you have contract), then it’s hard for you to set a start and decide your objective(s) for the call. date. • Take a deep breath, relax and smile. It Your notice period won’t have started and you might sound silly, but being tense and never know whether your current employer nervous really shows on the phone. A might want you to leave earlier – or beg for a relaxed, friendly smile affects your voice (try few more weeks. this one out!) and makes a better first impression. So try to be vague at this point. Explain that you need to discuss it with your current manager, but will give a concrete answer as soon as possible. See When Should I Start for more advice on this. Typical objectives for the call include: • Find out more about the job. Remember that recruiters are busy and speak Is there anything else you would like to to many applicants each day, so thank them know, to help you decide whether or not to for their time and be polite, but friendly. Until accept this job offer? you have a job offer in writing, it’s not official… • Negotiate a salary or package. Don’t expect an immediate answer. It’s common for the human resources person to have to check against company standards and available budget. Be prepared to justify your requests. • Agree start date / relocation. It’s dangerous to give notice on your current job, before you have everything from the new job in writing. Usually your new employer will want you to start as soon as possible. However, realistically, they probably won’t notice if © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 23 Closing The Deal
  • Salary Negotiation Phone Call Keep these notes in front of you as you make the call. Not only will it make you more confident, but the confidence and rational thinking will help you increase your chances of getting the package you want. Objective of the call Do I have any questions about the job, to help me make my decision? 3-5 reasons why I am interested in the job (you may be asked this) Exercise continues on next page… © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 24 Closing The Deal
  • 3-5 reasons why I’m worth the package I’m asking for. (If you can’t answer this, you’ll feel weaker, when negotiating). Salary & benefits package: current and what I’m looking for Best Case Worst Case Earliest start date (assume current notice period plus 1-2 weeks for signing the contract or a short holiday) Exercise continues on next page… © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 25 Closing The Deal
  • Any other questions Name & number to call: Notes from the call Well done! You’ve completed your preparation. Now all you need to do is make that call. Sit somewhere quiet and comfortable, where you can feel relaxed and confident. Take a deep breath. Smile and pick up that phone! Good luck! © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 26 Closing The Deal
  • 5 When Should I Start? How to get the start date you want, without feeling under pressure. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 27 Closing The Deal
  • As long as you’re polite and firm about this, 5 they’re unlikely to object. After all, you’re When Should I Start? just being professional. How to get the start date If it makes you feel more comfortable, you you want can even dress this up as “wanting to make sure I’ve had a chance to understand everything we’ve discussed.” Remember the old English expression: Usually, the earliest you can “There’s many a slip twixt the cup and the start your new job is defined lip.” by your current notice period. 2. Review the contract. However, this clock doesn’t start ticking until See below for more tips. There may be you actually hand in your notice, which you clauses in the contract that would prevent shouldn’t do until you’ve had a written job you from accepting the job offer. You have offer and seen a contract you’re happy with to iron these out, before handing in your – or you could end up unemployed! notice. Yet one of the key questions your new 3. Check your current notice period. employer will be pushing is “When can you In the UK this is typically one or three start?” months. It’s usually a worst case scenario. Your employer may let you leave earlier, particularly if they know your heart won’t be The most important thing is not to allow in your job any more. yourself to be pressured by the recruiter. However, others will hold you to every day of your notice period and may even ask you Chances are they’ve kept you hanging around to work longer, to complete any outstanding for long enough, reviewing CVs, discussing the projects. results of interviews and agreeing offers, so They may even refuse to accept your any delays are their responsibility, not yours. resignation and try to find ways to make you stay, which can add more time – unless But once you’ve decided to leave, you’ll be you’re really clear about wanting to leave keen to do it as soon as possible. and make them understand there’s nothing they can do. You won’t know their reaction until you So how do you agree a start date? actually quit. 4. You may feel you need a short break 1. Explain to the recruiter that you need to between jobs. review a written job offer and contract, This will obviously be unpaid, but it can before you can hand in your notice for your really help you let go of the old stresses current position. and politics, helping you feel refreshed for © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 28 Closing The Deal
  • your new start. It’s worth considering. Don’t be worried about factoring this in to your start date. Most companies are reasonable about this. And it’s a chance you don’t get very often! You might also need a week, if you’re relocating. It can be worth negotiating it into your contract. Many employers understand that you’ll need occasional time off to view properties and eventually move. Try to get this agreed up front. It’s usually easier, if they’re paying you a relocation allowance. So, say your notice period is one month; adding up the time above might mean: Date of telephone offer Time required Total Written offer 1 week 1 week Finalising contract & negotiations 1 week 2 weeks Current employer tries to get you to stay 1 week 3 weeks Clock ticks on your notice period 4 weeks 7 weeks 1 week’s holiday 1 week 8 weeks A one month notice period can easily turn into two months of real time, once you add in all the extra waiting and negotiating periods. So be careful of committing to start “next month”. Employers will usually be flexible, but do tend to get annoyed if they’ve arranged induction programmes for new recruits, who then change their minds about start dates. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 29 Closing The Deal
  • Probation Period This is becoming increasingly common. It Reviewing The Contract typically lasts 3-6 months. Make sure you read it carefully During this period, you may not be entitled to all the benefits mentioned in your contract, so Your formal, written job offer it’s important to check this out. should come with a formal contract of employment. During probation, your notice period may be shorter (even just a week, in some companies) Usually these are quite straightforward. and you may find it difficult to take vacation, unless you can prove it was already booked. However, there can be unusual clauses. The reason for having a probation period is so the company can give you a “trial period”, to We have included some common things for make sure they’ve made the right recruiting you to check in the list below. decision. It’s very hard to dismiss someone, once they’re a full employee, but it’s much easier if they’re “on probation”. However, it is not exhaustive and, if there’s anything that concerns you, you should take professional The key is to make sure you get defined advice before signing. objectives from your boss, so you understand what you will be expected to deliver, in order to pass. If there’s a clause you’re really not prepared to accept, then you may need to reject the job offer. Should you not pass your probation, the company is required to prove it has given you adequate warning and support, to improve If you manage to negotiate a your performance. It shouldn’t be a shock to compromise with the company, you. get it in writing – or you can’t prove anything. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 30 Closing The Deal
  • Relocation Allowances Sick Pay If you’re being offered relocation allowances, Companies are legally required to provide it’s to compensate you for uprooting your life to statutory sick pay for employees. However, a different part of the country. It can be an actual provisions can vary enormously. expensive business. Companies understand this. We have seen everything from 22 days to 6 It may mean that they include clauses in your months at full pay. contract that you have to repay a percentage of your relocation allowance (up to 100%), if you leave within a set time period. This is Some companies have slightly unusual usually a sliding scale, but can be a real “twists” to the sick pay rules. These are stinger; particularly if you don’t make it through worth being aware of. For example: your probation period, but have already moved house. • You get up to 22 days paid per rolling 12 month period. However, only the first 3 incidences are paid – even if one is only a half day because your boss sent you home. Holiday Entitlement So, in other words, if you have a headache, The number of days’ holiday you’re entitled to a cold and a bad back incident, that’s it for is usually specified, as part of the job offer. the year. The small print you might find in the contract could make a difference to whether you accept • You only get sick pay if you phone in before the job. Examples include: 9a.m. Otherwise you are considered absent without pay. • You might have to reserve 5 days for use at Christmas • Sick pay converts to holiday pay, if you’re ill • You might have to take holiday during during a company shutdown. company shutdowns (e.g. Christmas and summer). This may leave you with only 3 or 4 days that you can use at your own • You aren’t paid for the first three days of discretion. any period of illness. • You may be limited to taking a maximum of 2 weeks off at any time (may rule out long- distance holidays) • You might not be allowed to take holiday at the same time as any of your team members (leads to a rugby scrum at holiday booking time and moans of “not fair!”) © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 31 Closing The Deal
  • Maternity / Paternity Pay complete a medical questionnaire, which is returned to the company’s HR department. This can vary wildly between employers, with some being very generous and others offer the statutory minimum. Technically, they have no medical expertise and aren’t in a position to review your answers. If you’re planning on having a family, it’s worth checking out. Also, many people feel their medical history is personal and only to be shared with nominated medical professionals. However, be subtle about how you do this, because you don’t want your new employer to think you’re going to “disappear” for six You are perfectly entitled to ask what this months, as soon as you’ve completed your information will be used for and how your probation! patient confidentiality will be maintained. Extremes we have encountered include: Most HR departments believe they have good • Statutory minimum of six week’s paid reason for asking for this information. If in maternity leave, with the government doubt, take professional advice. minimum thereafter. • One year at full pay and a second year unpaid, during which your job is still held open for you. Travel Your contract may stipulate that “reasonable travel on company business” is expected of you. Medicals Many companies now ask about your medical It’s worth clarifying what that means. For history. This is ok, if you’re ok with it. some, it might mean the occasional overnight stay in Milton Keynes. For others, it could mean a compulsory three-month secondment However, it shouldn’t be a condition of to Malaysia. employment. It’s worth taking professional legal advice, if you think you’re going to have an issue. Sometimes a company will want a formal medical from your GP or will ask you to visit their company doctor. You are entitled to ask to see a copy of the report, before it is sent, and may formally object to anything you disagree with. Another common practice is requiring you to © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 32 Closing The Deal
  • Overtime Make sure you understand up front whether you will get paid overtime, time off in lieu, or whether it’s just “part of the job”. Some companies have slightly odd rules. For example: • You get paid overtime, but only for weekend working. • You get paid overtime if you’re working, but not if you’re travelling. • Time off in lieu is at your manager’s discretion (good luck!) Most contracts are written in legalese and cover all scenarios. This can make them sound more daunting than they’re actually intended to be. Chances are that the clauses that make you nervous are, in fact, harmless. So if you have a question, start with the company’s HR representative. If they can’t answer the question for you, then take professional advice. “Ask now, or forever hold your peace.” © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 33 Closing The Deal
  • 6 How To Quit My Current Job Departing with dignity, without burning your bridges – it’s a small world out there! © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 34 Closing The Deal
  • • Disbelief – “Why would they offer that to you?” or “How could you leave us?” 6 How To Quit My Current Job Handing in your notice • Joy – either because they’re proud of you without burning your bridges or glad to say goodbye… • Putting you down – “Well, you’ve not really added much here, anyway.” So you’ve decided to quit! You’ve had the written job offer. • Telling you you’re an idiot for leaving You’re happy with the contract. It’s the big Decision Day. How do you do it? • Dropping a bombshell like, “But you were about to get promoted” • Make you feel guilty: “You’re leaving me in Before you go to see your boss or HR the lurch” representative, be clear about: • When you want to leave • Being supportive: “We’ll miss you. I’m really • Why you’re leaving pleased for you and I’ll make sure you get • What the company could do to make you an excellent reference.” stay / Why there’s no chance that you’ll stay • Be prepared to explain how you found time Also be prepared for a potential counter-offer. to go to all those interviews – they could fire Your employer might want to keep you by you on the spot! matching or beating the package or responsibility level you’re being offered by your Be prepared for your boss’s reaction. future employer. All the reactions below are perfectly natural, Ideally, you should decide whether you will human responses to the news that they’re consider a counter-offer, before you hand in going to lose a member of their team. They your resignation. might feel proud of your achievement or hurt and rejected. Whatever happens, beware playing the companies off against each other – you could If they criticise you, then remember that’s their lose both jobs. baggage, not yours, and is unlikely to be a true reflection of your performance in the job. Try If you decide to go through with resigning, not to take it personally. follow these useful tips: © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 35 Closing The Deal
  • It’s usually a good idea to put your resignation in writing, before you talk to your boss. Hand deliver the letter to your boss or HR representative, rather than emailing it. It makes you look more serious and means you’re less likely to be talked out of your decision. If they can see you’re really going to leave, then they will probably accept your resignation – without trying to persuade you to stay. Don’t feel guilty. Yes, it starts a recruiting saga for your manager, but that’s not your concern. It’s part of being a manager. You’re taking the next step in your career and there are good reasons why you’re leaving your current job. Remember them, if you’re nervous about quitting. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 36 Closing The Deal
  • 7 The First Few Days Settling in well and making an excellent start © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 37 Closing The Deal
  • -------------------- TOP TIP -------------------- 7 How to remember people’s names: The First Few Days How to settle in well 1. Repeat their name when greeting them – it helps your brain store it. 2. Mentally write their name on their forehead, while they’re talking to you. Sometimes the first few days in a new job can pass in a blur – so many It helps your brain create a strong link people to meet; so much between their face and their name. to learn; you’re on an -------------------- TOP TIP -------------------- adrenaline rush. Get the complete job offer and contract in But sometimes it’s like being back in the writing before giving anything other than a interview. Nerves can creep in and you’re conditional acceptance. determined to make a good first impression. Be assertive The tips below are a whistle-stop tour, If you need to stop and think, do so. If designed to help you take the stress out of you’re not sure about something, ask. starting your new job. You’re responsible for making sure you get the induction and introductions you need, Ask questions!!! when starting your new job. Assume nothing! You’re not stupid if you don’t know something. You can always Understand your boss’s expectations precede it with “how’s it done here?” Does your boss want you to deliver results in your first few weeks, or are they willing to Take notes cut you some slack, as you settle in? It’s not a memory test. You shouldn’t expect Don’t assume anything on this one. It’s ok yourself to remember everything you’re told to ask. in the first few days and weeks. Try to write Your boss may be really busy. It’s not things down at the time, or immediately uncommon to get less than an hour with afterwards, if that’s more appropriate. them, in your first week. If you need more, ask for it. Be considerate, but don’t let their busy schedule impact your ability to make a Remember People’s Names good first impression. This can seem daunting, but it’s a great way to make a strong first impression. You could do this by simply concentrating, while They believe you can do the job making your notes, or maybe find a If nerves are kicking in, it’s usually in the company organisation chart, with names form of “have I made the right decision?” or and photos. “am I good enough to do this job?” © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 38 Closing The Deal
  • It’s important to remember that your new And that brings us to the end of these employer recruited you because they can workbooks. Congratulations on getting this far. see your potential. They must believe You’ve worked hard and deserve the success you’re up to the job, or they wouldn’t be you’re experiencing. paying you to do it. Early nerves are more likely to be because We’d love to hear your stories. If you’d like to you’re feeling slightly overwhelmed with all get in touch, send us an email, to let us know the new processes, people and information, how you’re getting on. rather than reflecting your ability to do the job. Remember all the reasons why you left contact us online your old job and took this one – you’ve made the right decision. You just need to We’d also like your feedback. It’s our aim to give it time. continually improve the products we offer job- hunters. So if you’d like to tell us about what’s worked for you and any bits that haven’t or you think should be added, send us an email. In return, we’ll send you links to download updated versions of these books, whenever they’re launched – free of charge. fsend us feedback online Thank you for taking this journey with us. And good luck for the future!!! Clare Jaques On behalf of the Interview Stuff Team © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 39 Closing The Deal
  • 8 Want To Know More? Remember to make the most of the free extra resources that come with this e-book. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 40 Closing The Deal
  • 24 Hours To Go £25 E-book 8 http://www.interviewstuff.com/24-hours-to- Want To Know More? go.html Make the most of these free resources All the last minute job interview advice you need in a concise, valuable e-book that will take you no more than 2 hours to go through. This e-book is designed to help you negotiate a fair salary and quit your old job with dignity. The Interview’s Looming £25 E-book If you want support on any other aspect of job hunting, they are covered in more detail in the http://www.interviewstuff.com/interview- following online resources. looming Everything you need to know about job interviews and how to prepare Includes specially-developed exercises to help Where Do I Start? Free online course you train yourself to answer even the trickiest http://www.interviewstuff.com/where-do-i-start questions Knowing why you want the job Where do you want to be in 5 years’ time After The Event Free E-book Why do you want to leave your current role? http://www.interviewstuff.com/after-the-event How to make sure your next job is better Trade secret follow-up strategies to help you increase your chances of a job offer Reading between the lines of the job advert How to learn from the interview and then let go, whilst waiting to hear the result CV-Confidence Free E-book What to do if things didn’t work out http://www.interviewstuff.com/cv-confidence 140 page ultimate guide to creating a All these resources are available to you, compelling CV / Resume that will get you more whenever you need them. interviews How to create a master CV / Resume If you’d like to give us feedback on these How to quickly tailor your CV for each job resources or tell us about your job hunting, How to fill “gaps” in your experience we’d love to hear from you. Contact us. Good luck! Clare Jaques Cover Letters Free E-book On behalf of the Interview Stuff team http://www.interviewstuff.com/cover-letters Jimmy Sweeney’s expert guide to writing a cover letter that gets interviews. © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 41 Closing The Deal
  • Exercise templates Print these forms out to complete the exercises as often as you need to. Exercise 1: Evaluate your current role.................................................................................... 43 Exercise 2: Four Questions That Can Make Your Head Spin ............................................... 44 Exercise 3: Deciding Whether To Accept ............................................................................... 45 Exercise 5: What information do I still need, to help me make my decision? .................... 47 © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 42 Closing The Deal
  • Exercise 1: Evaluate your current role My current / most recent role is: Example - Emma was fired from her recent temping job. I like… Be honest with yourself. Even if things aren’t so well any more, there must still be something you like! I won’t miss…Be objective and specific. What is motivating me to change? (Be honest!) And finally… Is there anything my current employer could do, to make me want to stay? Back to Evaluate Your Current Role © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 43 Closing The Deal
  • Exercise 2: Four Questions That Can Make Your Head Spin What will happen if you do accept the job offer? What will happen if you don’t accept the job offer? What won’t happen if you do accept the job offer? What won’t happen if you don’t accept the job offer? Back To 4 Questions That Can Make Your Head Spin © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 44 Closing The Deal
  • Exercise 3: Deciding Whether To Accept Step 1 Write a paragraph describing your next, ideal job. What will your team be like? What role will you play? What will your rewards be? What will you see? What will you hear? What will you feel? These last 3 questions might seem a bit strange, but they’re highly effective for clarifying your thoughts. Make sure you really get into the frame of mind you’d be in if you had the job. Step 2 Pull out the key elements from step 1. Write them in the table below. They might include: Whether you want to manage direct reports The size of team you want to manage (or not) Working hours, flexitime Level of responsibility Working environment Training Basic salary range Paid overtime Other benefits Holiday entitlement Career opportunities Location Amount of travelling Which of your key skills you most want to use / develop Which of your main values should be met Exercise continues on next page… © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 45 Closing The Deal
  • Then split them into one of three categories: Essential These are things that are so important to you that you next job must deliver them. Without these, you would reject a job offer. These items effectively provide your worst case scenario, when deciding whether to accept a job and negotiating a salary. Be careful not to put too many things in this category, or you’ll notice you find it really hard to get a job that meets your requirements. Important Important, but negotiable. These are things that you want, but would be prepared to sacrifice, if you had to. Nice to have The icing on the cake. These are things that would be a real bonus for you – they might make the critical difference between two jobs. When you’re deciding whether to accept a job offer, beware choosing your “nice to have” items instead of your “important” items. Essential Important, but negotiable Nice to have Accept the job? Yes No Back to Accept The Job? © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 46 Closing The Deal
  • Exercise 5: What information do I still need, to help me make my decision? Critical Useful Nice to know Do you really need to know all this? Sometimes we put obstacles and extra requirements in the way, to avoid having to make difficult decisions. So before you spend time, finding out what you want to know, just double-check whether you’re using it as a means to procrastinate. Once you’ve done that, revisit your answers and highlight the bits you really want to know. Back to What Information Do I Need? © Clare Jaques 2006 www.interviewstuff.com 47 Closing The Deal