Putting purpose into practice

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Policy makers need an infrastructure that seamlessly integrates with regulation-specific sources and services. This infrastructure should be designed for people and built for change.

Policy makers need an infrastructure that seamlessly integrates with regulation-specific sources and services. This infrastructure should be designed for people and built for change.

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  • 1. Putting purpose into practice Thei Geurts
  • 2. Putting purpose into practice Keeping the policy momentum
  • 3. Putting purpose into practice Keeping the policy momentum • Policy making defines the intention and the course of action. The formalized results of this activity include laws, regulations and procedures. These results are used as input for the process of policy execution. Policy execution involves fine-tuning political programs and bringing about their intended effects in everyday reality. In other words, policy execution is about putting purpose into practice. • The illustration also shows that this close relationship is required to establish and guarantee accountability during the entire process. The same applies to the political, legal, judicial, economic, social and other forms of scrutiny by a great variety of actors.
  • 4. For more information, see: Public Policy Making Public policy making can be characterized as a complex, dynamic, constantly evolving interactive and adaptive system. The process is stakeholder-driven. Actors are engaged in a goal-driven decision-making process and have a great deal of autonomy in the way they organize their work. The process has two dimensions: a political dimension and a production dimension. Policy makers need an infrastructure that seamlessly integrates with regulation-specific sources and services. This infrastructure should be designed for people and built for change. New technologies promise to support the policy making process in a revolutionary way. See also: Innovation by putting purpose into practice