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Newcastle presentation june 14
Newcastle presentation june 14
Newcastle presentation june 14
Newcastle presentation june 14
Newcastle presentation june 14
Newcastle presentation june 14
Newcastle presentation june 14
Newcastle presentation june 14
Newcastle presentation june 14
Newcastle presentation june 14
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Newcastle presentation june 14

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Presentation to the Hunter Creative Industries and Technology Centre at the University of Newcastle on 11 June, 2014.

Presentation to the Hunter Creative Industries and Technology Centre at the University of Newcastle on 11 June, 2014.

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  • 1. UNCTAD model of CIs
  • 2. UNESCO Framework
  • 3. Australia’s Creative Industries ($A GVA) 2005-2012
  • 4. Australian Creative Industries by employment, 2012-13
  • 5. Australian creative workforce, 2011
  • 6. Where are the ‘embedded creatives’?
  • 7. Creative workforce and creative industries High correlation (>80%) Medium correlation (30-80%) Low correlation (<30%) Journalists Photographers Media producers Advertisers Architects Composers Illustrators Visual arts & crafts professionals Web developers Graphic designers Software engineers Professional & technical writers Fashion designers Urban & regional planners Public relations professionals Body artists
  • 8. The ‘old’ CI model
  • 9. • I remember, in March 2007, going to see Tony Blair make a speech on the arts at Tate Modern, in which he boldly claimed to have presided over a cultural ‘golden age’. The arts, he told the gathered great and good, were a vital component of Britain's continued economic success: ‘A nation that cares about art will not just be a better nation. In the early 21st century, it will be a more successful one.’ In new Labour parlance, the arts had become the ‘creative industries’. Like bankers and stockbrokers, artists were expected to prop up the wobbly edifice of consumer capitalism, to generate profit, attract tourists, help Britain market itself as a cultural - and therefore financial – ‘hub’. Placing culture firmly at the service of finance had its advantages for the arts administrators in the audience, too, as it gave them a clear claim on their slice of the government pie (Alice O’Keeffe, New Statesman, Feb 2009)
  • 10. Strategies for Newcastle/ Hunter region CIs 1. Mapping of creative businesses 2. Audit of cultural and creative resources 3. Building on local success stories (e.g. Renew Newcastle) 4. Catalytic role of university 5. Open channels of communication between all levels of government and the local creative community.

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