Subgenres of literature<br />
Satire<br />Criticism of any stupidity or vice in the form of scathing humor, or a critique of what the author sees as dan...
Allegory <br />ALLEGORY: The word derives from the Greek allegoria ("speaking otherwise"). The term loosely describes any ...
Parody<br />PARODY (Greek:  “mock song"): A parody imitates the serious manner and characteristic features of a particular...
Quiz<br />1. Criticism of any stupidity or vice in the form of scathing humor, or a critique of what the author sees as da...
Quiz<br />What is…<br />Satire<br />Allegory<br />Parody<br />
Pastoral<br />An artistic composition dealing with the life of shepherds or with a simple, rural existence. Pastoral descr...
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Subgenres of literature2

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Subgenres of literature2

  1. 1. Subgenres of literature<br />
  2. 2. Satire<br />Criticism of any stupidity or vice in the form of scathing humor, or a critique of what the author sees as dangerous religious, political, moral, or social standards. Satire became an especially popular technique used during the Enlightenment, in which it was believed that an artist could correct folly by using art as a mirror to reflect society. <br />When people viewed the satire and saw their<br /> faults magnified in a distorted reflection, <br />they could see how ridiculous their behavior <br />was and then correct that tendency in<br /> themselves. The tradition of satire continues <br />today. Popular cartoons such as The Simpsons<br />and televised comedies like The Daily Show<br />make use of it in modern media. <br />Example 1; Example 2<br />
  3. 3. Allegory <br />ALLEGORY: The word derives from the Greek allegoria ("speaking otherwise"). The term loosely describes any writing in verse or prose that has a double meaning. This narrative acts as an extended metaphor in which persons, abstract ideas, or events represent not only themselves on the literal level, but they also stand for something else on the symbolic level. An allegorical reading usually involves moral or spiritual concepts that may be more significant than the actual, literal events described in a narrative. Typically, an allegory involves the interaction of multiple symbols, which together create a moral, spiritual, or even political meaning. <br />
  4. 4. Parody<br />PARODY (Greek: “mock song"): A parody imitates the serious manner and characteristic features of a particular literary work in order to make fun of those same features. The humorist achieves parody by exaggerating certain traits common to the work, much as a caricaturist creates a humorous depiction of a person by magnifying and calling attention to the person's most noticeable features. The term parody is often used synonymously with the more general term spoof, which makes fun of the general traits of a genre rather than one particular work or author. Often the subject-matter of a parody is comically inappropriate, such as using the elaborate, formal diction of an epic to describe something trivial like washing socks or cleaning a dusty attic. <br />Example: Original; Parody<br />
  5. 5. Quiz<br />1. Criticism of any stupidity or vice in the form of scathing humor, or a critique of what the author sees as dangerous religious, political, moral, or social standards.<br />2. This imitates the serious manner and characteristic features of a particular literary work in order to make fun of those same features. <br />3. This narrative acts as an extended metaphor in which persons, abstract ideas, or events represent not only themselves on the literal level, but they also stand for something else on the symbolic level.<br />
  6. 6. Quiz<br />What is…<br />Satire<br />Allegory<br />Parody<br />
  7. 7. Pastoral<br />An artistic composition dealing with the life of shepherds or with a simple, rural existence. Pastoral describes the simplicity, charm, and serenity attributed to country life, or any literary convention that places kindly, rural people in nature-centered activities. Typically, pastoral liturgy depicts beautiful scenery, carefree shepherds, seductive nymphs, and rural songs and dances.<br />
  8. 8. Gothic (background) <br />The word Gothic originally only referred to the Goths, one of the Germanic tribes that helped destroy Rome. The term later came to signify "Germanic," then "medieval," especially in reference to the medieval architecture and art used in western Europe between 1100 and 1500 CE. (The earlier art and architecture of medieval Europe between 700-1100 CE is known as "Romanesque.") Characteristics of Gothic architecture include the pointed arch, stained glass, and the use grotesques fitted into the nooks and crannies unoccupied by images of saints and biblical figures. A grotesque refers to a stone carving of a monstrous or mythical creature. Manuscripts from the Gothic period of art likewise have strange monsters and fantastical creatures depicted in the margins of the page. The term has come to be used much more loosely to refer to gloomy or frightening literature. <br />
  9. 9. Gothic Literature<br />Poetry, short stories, or novels designed to thrill readers by providing mystery and blood-curdling accounts of villainy, murder, and the supernatural. The conventions of gothic literature include wild and desolate landscapes, ancient buildings such as ruined monasteries; cathedrals; castles with dungeons, torture chambers, secret doors, and winding stairways; apparitions, phantoms, and demons; an atmosphere of brooding gloom; and youthful, handsome heroes and fainting (or screaming!) heroines who face off against corrupt aristocrats, wicked witches, and hideous monsters. Conventionally, female characters are threatened by powerful or impetuous male figures, and description functions through a metonymy of fear by presenting details designed to evoke horror, disgust, or terror.<br />
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