HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM  Present 2/2/11 Texas Economics Association Program Safety Education Services  ∙...
Required Safety Topics <ul><li>Drugs/alcohol, and consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Hazing </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual assault a...
HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM  Hazing Prevention  Program Safety Education Services  ∙ Office of the Dean of S...
Hazing Defined  <ul><li>Hazing   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Intentional, knowing, or reckless act </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On...
But what about consent?  <ul><li>Texas Law </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consent is Not a Defense </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Universit...
Myths and Facts about Hazing <ul><li>Hazing can occur in any type of club </li></ul><ul><li>Resisting hazing is better tha...
Reporting Obligation <ul><li>UT requires students to report all hazing, of themselves or others </li></ul><ul><li>Online: ...
POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCES <ul><li>Individual Discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Crimina...
HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM  Drug Possession, Use, and Abuse Program Safety Education Services  ∙ Office of ...
Facts About Drugs at UT <ul><li>Past Year Use: </li></ul><ul><li>28% of UT students smoked marijuana during the last year ...
Identify a Drug Problem <ul><li>Life problems </li></ul><ul><li>Too much  drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Can’t quit  drugs </li><...
Potential Affected Areas <ul><li>Health and Well-being </li></ul><ul><li>College Education </li></ul><ul><li>Graduate Scho...
On Campus Help <ul><li>Talk with a Professional </li></ul><ul><ul><li>University Health Services: (512) 475-8252 </li></ul...
Discipline and Criminal Laws <ul><li>UT Disciplinary Rules </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.utexas.edu/student/vpsa/securi...
HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Alcohol Use and Abuse  Program Safety Education Services  ∙ Office of the Dean o...
Alcohol Overdose <ul><li>Doctor needed if: </li></ul><ul><li>Passed out & can’t awake </li></ul><ul><li>Semi-conscious & i...
University Policy <ul><li>Underage drinking not allowed </li></ul><ul><li>Students disciplined whether on or off campus </...
University Policy - AMECH <ul><li>AMECH = Alcohol Medical Emergency Call for Help </li></ul><ul><li>Free service to curren...
State Law Issues <ul><li>Underage, excessive drinking, and alcohol-influenced behavior most common state law violations </...
Protect Yourself <ul><li>Reasonable Efforts: </li></ul><ul><li>Check IDs, no minors </li></ul><ul><li>Non-alcoholic bevera...
HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Reducing Risk of Sexual Assault Program Safety Education Services  ∙ Office of t...
Definition of Sexual Assault Sexual Assault occurs when  sexual act  against person who… 1. Has not consented 2. Is incapa...
<ul><li>Is… </li></ul><ul><li>Is not… </li></ul><ul><li>Choice </li></ul><ul><li>Active, not passive </li></ul><ul><li>Sha...
Predatory Drugs <ul><li>Alcohol used most often for assault </li></ul><ul><li>GHB, Rohipnol, and Ketamine </li></ul><ul><u...
How can we lessen our organization’s risk? <ul><li>Have a safety student officer to stop assault </li></ul><ul><li>Have cu...
How can we lessen our organization’s risk? <ul><li>Buddy system </li></ul><ul><li>Watch your drink </li></ul><ul><li>Talk ...
HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Sexual Harassment/Misconduct Program Safety Education Services  ∙ Office of the ...
Sexual Harassment/Misconduct <ul><li>Sexual Harassment  is a form of sex discrimination that involves the imposition of an...
Where can Sexual Harassment Occur? <ul><li>Sexual Harassment can occur anywhere on- or off-campus. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>N...
Sexual Harassment Dynamics <ul><li>1/5 of students say staff sexually harass students </li></ul><ul><li>68% of students sa...
If You Have Been Subjected to  Sexual Harassment/Misconduct <ul><li>Confront the Offender </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Say you do...
How to Report Sexual Harassment <ul><li>You can report your sexual assault, or suspected/possible sexual assault, to: </li...
HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM  Fire and Life Safety Program Safety Education Services  ∙ Office of the Dean of...
How to respond to a crisis at your event <ul><li>Call for help. </li></ul><ul><li>Stay calm. </li></ul><ul><li>Have inform...
Crime Prevention <ul><li>Blue light call boxes </li></ul><ul><li>Buddy system </li></ul><ul><li>Hide valuables in cars and...
My friend is acting strange… <ul><li>Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(512) 232-5050 or  www.ute...
If you see it…report it. <ul><li>Slippery floors </li></ul><ul><li>Water leaks </li></ul><ul><li>Broken glass </li></ul><u...
Weapons <ul><li>No weapons or fake weapons on campus </li></ul><ul><li>Must have  advance  permission from the Office of t...
HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM  Student Organization Travel Program Safety Education Services  ∙ Office of the ...
University Travel Policies (When does it apply?) <ul><li>SSO Travel Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Event >25 miles away </li></u...
University Travel Policies  (What are we required to do?) <ul><li>SSO Travel Policy </li></ul><ul><li>“ Request for studen...
General Car Travel Tips <ul><li>Seat belts </li></ul><ul><li>No alcohol </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t exceed max car occupancy –...
General Air Travel Tips <ul><li>Carry state or fed ID </li></ul><ul><li>Follow carry-on rules, review prohibited items </l...
General Emergency Procedures <ul><li>If you are involved in an accident: </li></ul><ul><li>Stop immediately and call 911 o...
HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM  Behavior at Parties and Other Organization Events Program Safety Education Serv...
Planning Tips to Remember <ul><li>When planning an event make sure to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect values of organizatio...
Factors to consider before planning a  “Date” or “Slave” Auction <ul><li>No date or slave auctions, unless some special ci...
The Event Planner(s) <ul><li>Complex to manage finances/plan </li></ul><ul><li>Select officer/leader/committee to lead </l...
Prohibited Student Conduct <ul><li>Harassment or discrimination against anyone </li></ul><ul><li>Damages/changes UT proper...
Tips for Etiquette at Professional Events <ul><li>Punctuality </li></ul><ul><li>No laptops/cell phones </li></ul><ul><li>A...
HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM  Summary and Conclusion Program Safety Education Services  ∙ Office of the Dean ...
Review: Campus Resources <ul><li>Free Wallet Cards Available </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Student Organization Risk Management Re...
Questions? <ul><li>All members must go online  </li></ul><ul><li>and acknowledge learning all of this: </li></ul><ul><li>s...
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Risk Training Mar 2 2011

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  • As required by Texas Education Code Section 51.9361 and the university, the three of us were required to attend a student leader training program in risk management this semester. In addition, the law requires us to present this safety training back to you all using this PowerPoint and the handouts we gave you. The following presentation will provide you with important safety information that all you need to know in order to ensure the safety and welfare for all. It will be important to listen and pay attention. Also please make sure you put your name, UT EID, and signature on the sign in sheet. We are required to submit this information to the Office of the Dean of Students for recordkeeping purposes.
  • So basically the university required us to receive training on these topics – drug and alcohol possession and use, hazing, sexual assault and harassment, fire and life safety, travel, student behavior at events, and adoption of a risk management plan. These were the safety topics required to be covered under the law. In addition, the training we receive and are sharing with you is meant to be specific to student organizations. The majority of our presentation this evening will be giving you the cliff’s notes version of these risk management issues.
  • Let’s start with the first one. The following section will discuss what constitutes hazing while also discussing the potential issues and consequences with hazing.
  • According to the state of Texas hazing statute and Chapter 16 of the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities , Hazing is defined as any intentional, knowing, or reckless act occurring on or off campus of an educational institution, by one person alone or acting with others, directed against a student, that endangers the mental or physical health or safety of a student for the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in any organization whose members are or include students at an educational institution. As you read this definition, it is important to note that: It does not matter if the act of hazing occurs on or off campus It does not matter if you are recognized by the campus (i.e. registered with SALD) As long as you have students as members you can be held accountable for hazing.
  • Although some students may say things like “Nobody FORCED them to do it” OR “We didn’t MAKE them do it” there is a power differential that exists and must be recognized in which new members allow themselves to be hazed. Under Texas state law, the fact that a person consented to or acquiesced in a hazing activity IS NOT a defense to prosecution for hazing under the law or discipline by the university. A violation of the University’s hazing prohibition renders not just the person inflicting the hazing, but also the person submitting to the hazing subject to discipline. However, the University may offer a person immunity from disciplinary action under certain circumstances.
  • MYTH : Hazing is only a problem for sororities and fraternities. FACT : Hazing is a societal problem. Hazing incidents occur among athletic teams, marching bands, the military, spirit organizations, religious clubs, professional schools and other types of organizations. MYTH : “ Eliminating hazing makes an organization just like any other social club. It will be too easy to become a member.” FACT : Any group can haze new members - that&apos;s the easy way out. It takes vision and commitment to run a good, non-hazing program. MYTH : “ A little hazing should be okay, as long as there&apos;s no mean-spirited or injurious intent.” FACT : Regardless of intent, some group bonding activities designed to be &amp;quot;all in good fun&amp;quot; still may raise some serious safety concerns.
  • A person who believes that he or she has been subjected to hazing in violation of the Institutional Rules, chapter 16, or a person who has knowledge of hazing activities should report the incident to the dean of students or another University official, administrator, or supervisor. A faculty member is not an “official, administrator, or supervisor” for this purpose unless that faculty member holds an administrative position. In any case, no person is required to report hazing to the alleged offender. If you become aware of or were subjected to hazing, please report the incident to the Office of the Dean of Students. Online: http:/deanofstudents.utexas.edu/complaint.php By Phone: (512) 471-3065
  • It is important to be aware that not only can our organization be held liable for criminal charges and university discipline but individual members can face these consequences as well. Individual Discipline The dean of students may initiate disciplinary proceedings against a student accused of violating the hazing prohibition policy. Organizational Discipline The dean of students may also initiate disciplinary proceedings against an organization accused of violating the hazing prohibition policy. Criminal and Civil Liability Through the criminal process, the District Attorney’s office can investigate and press charges against the organization and the individual(s). Through the civil process, individuals can be sued as an organization and as an individual.
  • Is there really a drug problem on college campuses? The use, possession, or abuse of illicit drugs, steroids, prescription drugs, and over-the-counter medications is not a new problem in the United States. We have all heard the stories on the news or on the internet about police arresting someone for drug possession or a famous celebrity who was found dead due to a drug overdose. What many people may not be aware of is that illegal use, possession, or abuse of drugs is also a problem on college and university campuses. The following section will discuss Drug Possession, Use, and Abuse and the various issues surrounding this topic. Furthermore, this section will give information on how to conduct an intervention if you feel someone you know (friend family member, organization member) is struggling with drug abuse.
  • First of all, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), approximately 40% of adults in the U.S. will use an illegal drug at some time during their lives. This does not include the use of alcohol or prescription medications. A study conducted at UT by the Harvard School of Public Health in 2004 found that 28% of students smoked marijuana in the past year and 31% used illicit drugs in the past year. A study conducted at UT by the American College Health Association in 2008 found that, in their lifetimes: 44% of UT students have smoked marijuana 7% of UT students have used cocaine 7% of UT students have used amphetamines 7% of UT students have used Ecstasy 10% of UT students have used other illicit drugs
  • Recognizing the signs of drug use or abuse is one of the most important steps each of us can take in getting someone help. While you may not remember every detail about someone’s behavior, you should be on the lookout for some of these red flags that are symptoms of drug abuse and dependence: The person has life problems related to the use of alcohol or other drug use. For example, neglecting responsibilities, relationships, etc. because of alcohol or other drug use The person sets limits on how often or how much he/she will drink or use and then exceeds those limits . The person makes promises to him/herself or someone else about drinking or using and then breaks those promises . For example, promising to cut back and the using the same amount as before The person lies about or tries to hide the amount and/or frequency of his/her drinking or other drug use. The person forgets or denies things that happened when he/she was intoxicated. For example, experiencing a blackout while intoxicated The person behaves very differently when intoxicated than when sober, as if he/she is a different person. For example, a mild-mannered person becoming aggressive or acting provocatively when intoxicated The person tends to avoid social functions at which alcohol &amp;/or other drugs may not be available. For example, the person asks if there is alcohol at a party and does not go if there isn’t The person feels guilty, embarrassed, or remorseful about things he/she said or did while intoxicated. The person has a very high tolerance ; that is he or she can drink or use a lot without acting or feeling intoxicated.
  • The possession, use or abuse of illegal drugs or abuse of prescription and over-the-counter drugs can result in significant physical, psychological, and other consequences for the person as well as family, friends, and others. In addition, substance abusers soon fall into a potentially destructive pattern - obtaining and using the drug becomes more important than anything else, including school, work, friends, or family. In the past year, almost one in four (22.9 percent or 1.8 million) full-time college students met the clinical definitions for alcohol and/or drug abuse or alcohol and/or drug dependence. Drug possession, use, or abuse can affect multiple areas of your life including: Your Health and Well-being Your College Education Graduate School Admissions or Employment Participation in Athletic Activities Relationships with Family, Friends, and Peers
  • There are several ways you can help someone who may have (or currently does have) a drug problem including: Talk with a Professional: You may be unsure what to do or have doubts about taking action. There are several university offices you can contact to answer your questions or concerns including: University Health Services: (512) 475-8252 Office of the Dean of Students: (512) 471-5017 Counseling and Mental Health Center: (512) 471-2255 Confidentially and Anonymously Report Your Concerns: You may feel uncomfortable confronting your friends, peers, or organization members directly. That’s okay and understandable. You can still help a friend or peer by calling the UT Behavioral Concerns Advice Line (B-CAL) at (512) 232-5050 which connects you to trained staff members 24 hours a day, 7 days week, 365 days a year. Conduct an Intervention: On the other hand, you may be ready to have a conversation in which you help a peer or friend come to a closer to understanding and accepting the nature of his or her relationship with drugs. The point of this activity should be to ask the person to take concrete steps to address the problem and lead them to the help they need (i.e. go for an evaluation, attend counseling, enter in- or out-patient treatment).
  • You can review the following web pages to review the university and legal consequences associated with a UT student who has been found to have illegally used, possessed, or distributed drugs. UT Disciplinary Rules: http://www.utexas.edu/student/vpsa/security/drugfree/penalties_texas.html Texas State Law: http://www.cc.utexas.edu/student/vpsa/security/drugfree/penalties_texas.html Federal Law: http://www.cc.utexas.edu/student/vpsa/security/drugfree/penalties_federal.html
  • The objectives of this section on alcohol use and abuse include reviewing the common problems associated with alcohol use and abuse and the best ways to avoid the related hazards. Additionally, the training will briefly outline the legal and civil risks involved with alcohol services along with efforts our organization can take to effectively manage the legal and civil risks.
  • Alcohol overdose is another hazardous consequence of alcohol misuse and abuse. One of the biggest problems for students is that they do not recognize when there is a real problem. Alcohol overdose is potentially a critical medical situation if you find someone passed out but you cannot wake them or they are semi-conscious and incoherent. There may be a medical emergency if an individual is found vomiting without awakening, has shallow, irregular breathes, cold, clammy, pale, or bluish skin, or they experience seizures, convulsions, or rigid spasms. If you see any of the signs of alcohol overdose, you should take every measure to ensure the safety of others and take these symptoms seriously. Oftentimes students will notice the symptoms but decide let the person just sleep it off not thinking the situation is too serious. The truth is that when anyone experiences one of these symptoms, the level of risk increases significantly for you and your organization. -------------------- The first thing you should do is call 911 for Emergency Help. Oftentimes the 911 Operator will ask you a series of questions to help guide you to best help a friend or fellow students in need. When help arrives, the best qualified professionals can assess whether further medical attention is needed. Next, put the person in the BACCHUS Maneuver (see the handout). It is very important that you stay with the person to ensure nothing further happens to them.
  • The University policy clearly prohibits underage drinking, driving while intoxicated, public intoxication, and other misconduct consistent with state laws and statues. Less commonly known is that individual students and student organizations can be subject to disciplinary action whether the conduct takes place on or off campus or whether civil or criminal penalties are also imposed. Sometimes students will plead ignorance as a defense for their behavior. However, as with the state law, ignorance of the policy does not protect you or your organization from disciplinary action. It is very important for us and our organization to understand the UT policies and potential consequences. You can review the University policies by going to www.healthyhorns.utexas.edu/ruleslaws.html
  • The University recognizes that the fear of potential disciplinary action might create a barrier to or inhibit students from seeking emergency medical assistance for themselves or others when alcohol overdose is suspected. In order to remove that barrier, the University has instituted the Alcohol Medical Emergency Call for Help (AMECH) program. Under the AMECH program, students who have sought emergency medical assistance for themselves or others will not face formal disciplinary action from Student Judicial Services (SJS) in the Office of the Dean of Students. Here&apos;s how it works: Student(s) calls 911 when alcohol overdose is present or suspected. Involved students will be referred to SJS. Student(s) will be evaluated for inclusion in the AMECH program by SJS. Student’ eligible for the AMECH program will still be required to participate in the educational component and may be referred for an individual consultation; however, they will not face formal disciplinary action. Students in the AMECH program who decline or fail to attend the educational component or fail to comply with the counselor&apos;s recommendations will become subject to formal disciplinary action. There are limitations to this program and inclusion in the program is not automatic. Call SJS for more information at (512) 471-2841.
  • For the most part, you probably familiar with state laws prohibiting underage drinking, public intoxication, driving while under the influence, and possession of an illegal drug among many others. Nonetheless, underage and impaired driving as well as other misbehavior related to heavy drinking such as public intoxication, sexual and physical assault continue to be the most frequent kinds of violations on college campus across the country including the University of Texas at Austin. Impaired driving is particularly problematic because of the potential for harm to others and death. Although over 70% of UT students reported using a designated driver after a partying, there continues to be tolerant attitudes permissive of drinking and driving. Another common issue found among students is picking the wrong person to be the designated driver. Finally, another unfamiliar issue in the legal system is affirmative link. It is a misperception that the police need a “smoking gun” or to see you with alcohol in your hand for them to cite you for a violation. However, state law allows an officer to cite a minor for possession and other violations even if the alcohol spilled on the ground long before the officer climbed out of the patrol car. The officer simply must prove an &amp;quot;affirmative link&amp;quot; between the minor and the alcohol.
  • Here is a list of recommended ways we can reduce our risk of alcohol becoming a problem for our organization: Firstly, if we have alcohol present at an organization event, we should hire a third party vendor. Another very effective tool is checking the identification of all members and guests to prevent service of alcohol to minors. In addition, avoiding the use of common or self-serve containers. Hiring a bartender who makes drinks or bottles of beer helps to control and track the volume and concentration of alcohol in drinks served. Another common sense approach is having real food and non-alcoholic beverages available. They provide an alternative to drinking only. Also, it promotes other behaviors such as alternating non-alcoholic drinks with alcoholic drinks and eating a meal before drinking to reduce how much a person drinks. Calling the Austin or UT Police Department are always options for help if something gets out of control (i.e., fight, injury, alcohol overdose). Planning ahead to have a variety of safe rides home is an added benefit. Letting friends and guests walk home can be a hazard although a person is not drinking and driving and lead to arrest for public intoxication. So, use taxis, take the E-Bus, or use a designated driver. Finally, the university requires each of us to complete AlcoholEdu, an online alcohol prevention program. The program helps reduce your and our organization’s risk by avoiding the common hazards related to alcohol misuse and abuse. To learn more and take AlcoholEdu for Student Leaders, go to www.healthyhorns.utexas.edu/alcoholedu/aedu_leaders.html .
  • The following section will discuss the issue of Sexual Assault. Sexual assault is an umbrella legal term that describes a variety of sexual violations, including (but not limited to) rape, attempted rape, and sexual abuse. These violations can happen between any two individuals, regardless of their gender identity, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, ability, and/or religious identity. The roots of sexual assault lie in one person’s need and/or desire for power over another person. Sexual assault is never about love or attraction. It is, instead, about control and domination.
  • This is best done by first establishing a working definition of sexual assault. A sexual assault occurs when a sexual act is directed against another person when that person has not consented, is incapable of consenting, or when the act is forced.
  • You may notice in this definition that it includes a lot about consent. What do we mean when we talk about consent? Synonyms for consent include “agreement” and “permission.” In the context of sexuality, when someone gives consent to a particular sexual act, they are giving their agreement and/or permission for that act to occur. Consent is an active term, meaning that it involves that actual saying of “yes” and not just the absence of “no.” In order for consent to be present, the person giving consent has to truly feel that they have a choice in the matter – that they can say yes or no freely without negative consequence. In line with this, therefore, consent can only happen when two people share equal power (i.e. they are relative peers). It is also important to note that consent is negotiable for each stage of intimacy, i.e. saying “yes” to kissing doesn’t mean “yes” to sex.
  • While alcohol is the most frequently used drug to facilitate sexual assault, there are numerous others that can be easily slipped into someone’s individual drink or into a group drink that is not being monitored. These drugs can include GHB, Rohipnol, and Ketamine, which often affect memory and the ability to control one’s limbs and body. The use of any of these drugs to facilitate sex with someone constitutes sexual assault. Whether hosting an event on campus or attending one out in town, it is important to watch your drink at all times and to remain alert to changes in taste or visual appearance of your drink (i.e. a pill dissolving in the bottom, fizzing or bubbling when the drink is swirled or shaken, cloudiness, etc.). If you suspect that your drink has been tampered with, throw it out immediately and notify someone of your concern.
  • This risk reduction strategies include: Having someone designated to monitor and control the distribution of alcohol at student organization events Establishing an organizational culture that does not tolerate sexually predatory behaviors and holds the offenders of such behavior accountable with tangible consequences. Intervening when you observe coercive or questionable behavior.
  • Attending functions, parties, etc. with at least one other person that you trust. Agree in advance that you will arrive together and leave together and look out for each other while at the function. Maintaining control of your particular drink, if you choose to drink at an event. If you set your drink down or it is out of your control for any period of time, throw it out and get a new one. Beginning and continuing dialogues about these issues. Having resources available about the risks of sexual assault and resources for survivors.
  • Sexual Harassment and Sexual Misconduct are issues that college students are susceptible more often than they may be aware. The following discussion points will give you a better idea of what constitutes this type of inappropriate behavior and how to respond if you are sexually harassed.
  • The University of Texas at Austin is committed to maintaining an educational environment that is free from inappropriate conduct of a sexual nature through policies prohibiting sexual assault, harassment, or misconduct by any member of the university community. The prohibition of sexual harassment or misconduct extends to all activities of registered student organizations, regardless of whether or not the activity takes place on- or off- campus. Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that involves the imposition of an unwanted condition or requirement on the continued employment or education of the victim. Sexual harassment is against the law AND a violation of university policy. Sexual misconduct is conduct of a sexual nature that, although not so serious or pervasive that it rises to the level of sex discrimination or sexual harassment, is unprofessional and/or inappropriate for the educational and workplace environment.
  • Where Does Sexual Harassment Occur? All Over Campus Sexual Harassment can occur anywhere on- or off-campus. Not confined to particular location The number of incident at a location reflects the amount of time students spend there Among students who have been harassed: 39% were in a dorm or student housing 37% were outside on campus grounds 24% were in common areas of campus buildings 20% were in classrooms 27% were “someplace else” 12% were unsure where they were harassed
  • Though it is less common, sexual harassment of students by faculty and staff members is still an issue. Almost one-fifth of students (18 percent) say that faculty and staff often or occasionally sexually harass students. ----------------------------- Student-to-student harassment is the most common form of sexual harassment on campus. More than two-thirds of students (68 percent) say that peer harassment happens often or occasionally at their college, and more than three quarters of students (80 percent) who experienced sexual harassment have been harassed by a student or a former student.
  • If You Think You Have Been Subjected to Sex Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, or Sexual Misconduct: -Confront the Offender: A student may, at any time, personally confront the individual whose conduct is offensive, unwelcome, or intimidating. -Explain that the conduct is offensive or makes you feel intimidated or uncomfortable and ask that it stop. -Make sure that your message to the individual is clear. However, if the previously mentioned action is not feasible or successful, or if a student feels uncomfortable taking the above approach, the options described below are also available. -Report It: It is important for persons who believe they have been subjected to inappropriate conduct to report it and get help to protect themselves and others from unwanted sexual attention and advances that may interfere with academic opportunities and performance. -Sexual harassment and misconduct are both taken very seriously and will be addressed immediately by university officials.
  • The University of Texas at Austin is committed to maintaining an educational environment that is free from inappropriate conduct of a sexual nature. UT encourages students who believe that they may have been subjected to sexual discrimination, harassment, or misconduct by University faculty, staff, students, visitors, or contractors to report it immediately to: Dr. LaToya Hill, Assistant Dean of Students, Office of the Dean of Students, at (512) 471-5017 or lchill@mail.utexas.edu; or Linda Millstone, Associate Vice President for Institutional Equity and Workforce Diversity, Equal Opportunity Services, at (512) 471-1849 or lindam@austin.utexas.edu.
  • Fire and Life Safety is a topic that is often overlooked by student organizations despite the fact that an emergency involving these items can grave. Here are some tips and advice on how to avoid putting you and our organization in danger.
  • The last thing we would expect at an event is for a crisis to arise. The best thing to do is to call for help as early as possible and utilize campus resources. Calling 911 from a cell phone will connect you with the City of Austin dispatch. Provide as much detail as you can and stay on the line with the dispatcher until they release you. To ensure the fastest response, have a friend call UTPD at 471-4441 or make the call yourself in addition to 911. The Office of the Dean of Students can help with a variety of emergencies including fires that occur in residences, notifying professors of absences due to injuries, illness or emergencies and so much more. Hopefully, we will have planned well and rarely if ever have to face this but if each of you should know that there is always help from the University.
  • Ever wonder what would constitute a need to press one of those blue light emergency call buttons on-campus? Well it could be that you are walking by yourself and feel that someone is following you, if so push the button and keep walking, push the next blue light and keep walking and continue until the police arrive. It could also be that you see a crime in progress while walking near a blue light. However it may not be related to a crime at all it could be a medical emergency and you need an ambulance right away. If you think you should push the button then go ahead and do so. Just remember these are not toys and not for calling to find out directions on campus. We’ve been taught from a young age to walk in well lit areas, use the buddy system and lock doors. This is still true today and ever more so. When you visit the UTPD’s website and sign up for their Campus Watch you will see that there area variety of crimes that occur on-campus as well as in the surrounding areas. Arm yourself with the knowledge of how to increase your safety. When downtown at night always stay with people you know well and trust. When choosing to walk either around campus or off-campus, whether it be attending an organizational meeting or event, do so with friends and in well lit areas. Also, be smart and lock up your belongings and mark them well incase they are stolen. So many times you see in Campus Watch that wallets, keys, iPods are stolen when someone is playing basketball at the gym just a few feet away or the laptop is stolen out from under them as they slept in the Union. Maybe they ran down the hall to use the bathroom in the dorms and came back to their room to find their TV gone. Be aware and be safe.
  • If you are concerned about a member of the UT community, whether it be a friend, staff member or faculty member, you can contact the Behavior Concerns Advice Line or BCAL. When you call BCAL you will get a live person to speak with 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. You can ask to remain anonymous. However if you want to send a report on-line you can do so by visiting www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal. You will be asked when reporting on-line to enter your UT EID logon, thus this method is cannot be anonymous. Also, when submitting a report on-line be aware the reports are answered during normal, Monday – Friday, 8-5 business hours.
  • So many times individuals will walk by something that looks out of place and they continue walking to their destination. Whether you are in class, using a campus room for a student organization meeting or just walking by, we ask that if you see something report it. You never know if you are the first to see it or you might be the first to report it. As a student leader your participation in keeping our campus safe affects you and your student organization. Be engaged in the community and help keep it and the members of your student organization safe. It’s always better to err on the side of caution. If something is a safety hazard and broken you can contact University Facilities Services at (512) 471-6188 during regular business hours or (512) 471-2020 after hours. Your call can make our campus safer for everyone.
  • The University of Texas has a policy regarding weapons and facsimile weapon possession on campus. Maybe your organization is planning to highlight various martial arts during an exhibition in front of Gregory Gym and you want to use wooden staffs and spears. Or maybe you are an RTF student shooting a film on-campus and want to use fake machine guns for an important scene. Both students and student organizations who wish to bring a weapon or facsimile weapon onto the UT campus must have advance permission from the Office of the Dean of Students. A “Weapons Approval Form” must be filled out and turned into their office. You can access this form by going to http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/pses/downloads/WeaponsApprovalForm.pdf or by calling (512) 471-5017. Be sure to plan far enough in advance to seek the required approval.
  • This section will go over information that our organization should take into account when planning a trip. Having a plan in the event something should happen, rather it be a tragedy or a simple flat tire; it’s always great to take into perspective what may happen.
  • There are two different types of travel policies at The University of Texas at Austin. Depending on the type of student organization – departmentally sponsored (SSO) or just registered (RSO) – there are different requirements. The Student Travel Policy for University-Organized or Sponsored Events (SSO Travel Policy) , located in the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities , applies to all travel more than 25 miles away from the main campus that involves sponsored student organization OR enrolled students attending events or activities that are organized and/or sponsored by the university. The Student Travel Policy for Registered Student Organizations (RSO Travel Policy) , also located in the Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities , applies to all travel more than 25 miles away from the main campus in which a registered student organization requires a student member(s) to attend the activity or event.
  • If an organization is sponsored by a UT department or college and members of the organization are travelling more than 25 miles away from the 40 Acres, they are required to obtain prior approval from appropriate UT administrator (in their department or college) and fill out the following forms: Request for Student Travel Authorization Release and Indemnification Agreement Medical Authorization Form Request for Special Event Health Insurance If a registered student organization is requiring members to travel more than 25 miles away from the main campus, they are required to obtain prior approval from staff in the SALD area of the Office of the Dean of Students and fill out the following forms: Information Sheet for Registered Student Organization Travel Travel Information Packet Release and Indemnification Agreement Medical Authorization Form Request for Special Event Health Insurance
  • If a member (or members) of a student organization is/are travelling to a destination using personal, rental or other motor vehicle, he or she should follow the safety guidelines below: Occupants of motor vehicles shall use seat belts or other approved safety restraint devices required by law or regulation at all times when the vehicle is in operation Occupants of motor vehicles should never possess, consume or transport any alcoholic beverages or illegal substances The total number of passengers in any vehicle, at anytime it is in operation, shall not exceed the manufacturer’s recommended capacity, or the number specified by University Policy, or federal or state law or regulations, whichever is lowest. Make sure all drivers have valid drivers licenses and proof of insurance. Also ensure each vehicle has a current registration and emissions sticker. NOTE: If our organization is engaged in travel covered under the UT Travel Policies, we will be required to adhere with the above rules and regulations. (Source: UT Revised Handbook of Operating Procedures, Policy 12.B.1)
  • Air travel, although sometimes quicker than car travel, differs from automobile modes of transportation mainly because of current federal security regulations. The following risk management tips can help you and the other members of our organization have a safer and more enjoyable air travel experience: Always carry a current U.S. federal or state-issued photo ID Always carry a current passport for international trips Follow all rules related to what you can and can’t carry on an airplane Remember the 3-1-1 for Carry-On Items Review the list of prohibited items Place your name, home address, itinerary, and destination inside each bag Always book a place to stay before you leave Keep your small expensive items and other small personal items in your carry-on bag
  • If your vehicle or a another vehicle being used by our organization is involved in an accident, take the following steps to keep everyone safe: Stop immediately and call 911 or local police Assess the situation and render aid as appropriate. Make sure that all members of your organization are accounted for and find out if anyone is hurt or injured. Fill out a police report (if you are asked to do so) Obtain the names and addresses of all witnesses Contact your advisor. All drivers and officers should have phone numbers for the organization’s faculty/staff advisors along with other university resources. Avoid making statements as to who is at fault, nor should you make offers to pay for damages Contact the Student Activities and Leadership Development or Student Emergency Services areas in the Office of the Dean of Students upon your return to campus.
  • This section will go over information that our organization should take into account when planning an event such as party. Creating an event requires a lot of planning, work and thought. While your organizations events – social, professional, etc. – have the potential to benefit all members of our organizations, they types of events and how they are run are a reflection on our entire organization and each of us.
  • It is important as an organization to identify the types of events we will be conducting and their purpose – social, professional, intellectual, recreational, competitive, etc. When planning an event, the university recommends that we consider the following planning tips: Choose events that reflect the values and beliefs of our organization and members. Invite people and groups we know. Appoint or designate “event monitors” to handle emergencies and other event details. Appoint “designated drivers” if hosting an event where alcohol will be served. Confront inappropriate behavior quickly and firmly. Have an emergency/crisis management plan in place and review it with all of members prior to the event. Remember that the types of events we host are a reflection of our organization’s values.
  • A risky and potentially offensive event some organizations choose to host to raise money is the “Date” or “Slave” Auction. While most organizations do this type of event with good intentions, the result can be damaging to the organization and participants. “Date” or “Slave” auctions involve “bidding” on a human being for their services or the ability to spend time with a certain person. This process devalues a human being to the level of merchandise and involves a comparison of the relative “value” of each person being auctioned. This process has the appearance of actual slave auctions, which are a real and tragic part of this country’s history. In addition, it is important to consider safety concerns that arise as a result of “Date” auctions. When a person “wins” the ability to spend time with another person, there is no way of discerning their true motives. Given the prevalence of sexual assault in our culture, safety concerns exist if we allow a member of our organization to be compelled to spend time alone with someone that she/he may not know. At UT Austin, equality, openness, and sensitivity are strongly held values. For this reason and ALL of the reasons mentioned before, student organizations are encouraged to engage in more imaginative and feasible alternatives to these activities.
  • Student organization events such as conferences, award ceremonies, and competitions can be quite complex to manage. Events can involve numerous tasks including budgets, event schedules, seating arrangements, training for volunteers, etc. An essential component to creating successful events requires selecting an officer, other organization member, or committee/team to take the lead (i.e., the event planners). Selecting the planner for our organization’s events is an important decision. Qualities of good event planners (or event planning teams) include: experience within the organization; excellent organizational, communication and time management skills; ability to handle stressful, fast-paced situations; and passion and a strategic vision.
  • The Institutional Rules on Student Services and Activities (Appendix C of the General Information Catalog ) outline the standards of conduct expected of all students at the University of Texas at Austin. Whether a student or student organization is on- or off- campus, all Longhorns are expected to abide by these standards. Please be aware that the following behaviors violate these rules: Engaging in harassment or discrimination against another student or University employee; Damaging, defacing, destroying, altering, or taking UT property without authorization of the University; Impeding or interfering with an authorized University function including teaching, research, or disciplinary; Endangering the health or safety of another student or University employee; Failing to identify oneself/providing false information to an institutional representative; Unauthorized entry into university buildings or fountains; and Engaging in conduct that violates federal; state; and or local laws such as theft, hazing, DWI, or underage drinking. While the above list is not exhaustive, you can obtain a copy of the Institutional Rules on Students Services and Activities by visiting http://registrar.utexas.edu/catalogs/index.html or contacting the Student Organization Center (SOC) at 512-471-3065.
  • Not every event is a party or happy hour. Many UT student organizations are engaged in academic or professional endeavors such as conferences, corporate recruiting fairs, and professional association meetings. It is just as important during these professional events to address risk, set expectations, and represent the organization well. Tips for etiquette at professional events include: Show up on time, do not leave early! Do not use laptops or cell phones Ask appropriate questions Dress appropriately Let each person have a chance to speak Eat and drink in moderation Do not monopolize people’s time – know what the purpose of the event is and come prepared
  • This section will provide you with the summary of the resources available to you if you want to learn more about any of the topics covered in our presentation.
  • Program Safety Education Services in the Office of the Dean of Students offers free wallet cards that cover student organization and personal safety resources. There are also content-specific web pages for each risk management topic covered this evening. You can access them by going to the “Training Resources” link on our website at http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/pses/hb2639rmep/trainres.php. These web pages are always a work-in-progress, and we appreciate any recommendations for links that you might have. Finally, we just want to remind you that the Office of the Dean of Students has a variety of areas that can help you and our student organization with safety and risk management issues.
  • Risk Training Mar 2 2011

    1. 1. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Present 2/2/11 Texas Economics Association Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin
    2. 2. Required Safety Topics <ul><li>Drugs/alcohol, and consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Hazing </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual assault and harassment </li></ul><ul><li>Fire/guns/weapons/explosive devices </li></ul><ul><li>Outside travel </li></ul><ul><li>Behavior at events </li></ul><ul><li>Adoption of risk management </li></ul><ul><li>All this is required by law </li></ul>
    3. 3. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Hazing Prevention Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin
    4. 4. Hazing Defined <ul><li>Hazing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Intentional, knowing, or reckless act </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On or off campus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By one or multiple people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Directed against a student </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Endangers the mental or physical health or safety </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For the purpose of pledging, being initiated into, affiliating with, holding office in, or maintaining membership in a student org </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. But what about consent? <ul><li>Texas Law </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consent is Not a Defense </li></ul></ul><ul><li>University Policy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consenter and inflictor are subject to discipline </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Myths and Facts about Hazing <ul><li>Hazing can occur in any type of club </li></ul><ul><li>Resisting hazing is better than giving in to hazing. </li></ul><ul><li>Even a little hazing can raise a lot of safety concerns. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Reporting Obligation <ul><li>UT requires students to report all hazing, of themselves or others </li></ul><ul><li>Online: http:/deanofstudents.utexas.edu/complaint.php </li></ul><ul><li>Phone: (512) 471-3065 </li></ul>
    8. 8. POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCES <ul><li>Individual Discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational Discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Criminal and Civil Liability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be sued by the DA’s office </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Drug Possession, Use, and Abuse Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin (Drugs are a problem everywhere in the US)
    10. 10. Facts About Drugs at UT <ul><li>Past Year Use: </li></ul><ul><li>28% of UT students smoked marijuana during the last year </li></ul><ul><li>31% of UT students used illicit drugs during the last year </li></ul><ul><li>Lifetime Use (at least once): </li></ul><ul><li>44% of UT students have smoked marijuana </li></ul><ul><li>7% of UT students have used cocaine </li></ul><ul><li>7% of UT students have used amphetamines </li></ul><ul><li>7% of UT students have used Ecstasy </li></ul><ul><li>10% of UT students have used other illicit drugs </li></ul>
    11. 11. Identify a Drug Problem <ul><li>Life problems </li></ul><ul><li>Too much drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Can’t quit drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Lying about doing drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Memory loss from drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Lying about activities after you did drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Different behavior during drugs </li></ul><ul><li>Avoiding non-drug events </li></ul><ul><li>Feeling bad about things done after you did drugs </li></ul><ul><li>High tolerance for drugs </li></ul>
    12. 12. Potential Affected Areas <ul><li>Health and Well-being </li></ul><ul><li>College Education </li></ul><ul><li>Graduate School or Employment </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in Athletic Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Family, Friends, and Peers </li></ul>
    13. 13. On Campus Help <ul><li>Talk with a Professional </li></ul><ul><ul><li>University Health Services: (512) 475-8252 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Office of the Dean of Students: (512) 471-5017 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Counseling and Mental Health Center: (512) 471-2255 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Confidentially Report Your Concerns </li></ul><ul><ul><li>UT Behavioral Concerns Advice Line: (512) 232-5050 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(24 hours a day, 7 days week, 365 days a year) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Conduct an Intervention </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Help a peer or friend understand and accept the nature of their relationship with drugs, ask them to address the problem, and lead them to help. </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Discipline and Criminal Laws <ul><li>UT Disciplinary Rules </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.utexas.edu/student/vpsa/security/drugfree/penalties_texas.html </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Texas State Law </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.cc.utexas.edu/student/vpsa/security/drugfree/penalties_texas.html </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Federal Law </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.cc.utexas.edu/student/vpsa/security/drugfree/penalties_federal.html </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Alcohol Use and Abuse Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin
    16. 16. Alcohol Overdose <ul><li>Doctor needed if: </li></ul><ul><li>Passed out & can’t awake </li></ul><ul><li>Semi-conscious & incoherent </li></ul><ul><li>Vomiting in sleep </li></ul><ul><li>Shallow, irregular breathing </li></ul><ul><li>Cold, clammy, pale, bluish skin </li></ul><ul><li>Seizures, convulsion, or rigid spasms </li></ul><ul><li>What to do </li></ul><ul><li>Call 911 IMMEDIATELY </li></ul><ul><li>Put the person in the recovery positions (Bacchus Maneuver) </li></ul><ul><li>Stay with the person until help arrives </li></ul>
    17. 17. University Policy <ul><li>Underage drinking not allowed </li></ul><ul><li>Students disciplined whether on or off campus </li></ul><ul><li>Ignorance of policy does not protect </li></ul><ul><li>Important to become familiar with UT policies </li></ul><ul><li>Go to www.healthyhorns.utexas.edu/ruleslaws.html </li></ul>
    18. 18. University Policy - AMECH <ul><li>AMECH = Alcohol Medical Emergency Call for Help </li></ul><ul><li>Free service to currently enrolled UT students </li></ul><ul><li>No action from Student Judicial Services </li></ul><ul><li>How to use: </li></ul><ul><li>Call 911 for immediate help; later you will be referred to SJS for the suspected alcohol incident </li></ul><ul><li>Education program without discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Declining education program means discipline </li></ul><ul><li>More information, call SJS at (512) 471-2841 </li></ul>
    19. 19. State Law Issues <ul><li>Underage, excessive drinking, and alcohol-influenced behavior most common state law violations </li></ul><ul><li>Impaired driving is common </li></ul><ul><li>Students must discourage impaired driving </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes find least-drunk person to drive instead </li></ul><ul><li>Police must simply show strong link between alcohol and minor </li></ul><ul><li>Go to www.healthyhorns.utexas.edu/ruleslaws.html </li></ul>
    20. 20. Protect Yourself <ul><li>Reasonable Efforts: </li></ul><ul><li>Check IDs, no minors </li></ul><ul><li>Non-alcoholic beverages available </li></ul><ul><li>No drinking games </li></ul><ul><li>Call for help with fights, injury, or alcohol overdose </li></ul><ul><li>Provide designated drivers </li></ul><ul><li>AlcoholEdu for Student Leaders available at www.healthyhorns.utexas.edu/alcoholedu/aedu_leaders.html </li></ul>
    21. 21. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Reducing Risk of Sexual Assault Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin rape, attempted rape, and sexual abuse
    22. 22. Definition of Sexual Assault Sexual Assault occurs when sexual act against person who… 1. Has not consented 2. Is incapable of consenting 3. Is forced to do accept it
    23. 23. <ul><li>Is… </li></ul><ul><li>Is not… </li></ul><ul><li>Choice </li></ul><ul><li>Active, not passive </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing equal power </li></ul><ul><li>Permission by active “Yes” </li></ul><ul><li>At each level of intimacy </li></ul><ul><li>From fear or coercion </li></ul><ul><li>From manipulation, deception, or lying </li></ul><ul><li>From unequal power </li></ul><ul><li>Certain with alcohol and drugs – makes ambiguous </li></ul>Consent
    24. 24. Predatory Drugs <ul><li>Alcohol used most often for assault </li></ul><ul><li>GHB, Rohipnol, and Ketamine </li></ul><ul><ul><li>affect memory/motor controls </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Easy to use in your drink, or group drink/punch bowl </li></ul><ul><li>Using drugs for sex is sexual assault </li></ul>
    25. 25. How can we lessen our organization’s risk? <ul><li>Have a safety student officer to stop assault </li></ul><ul><li>Have culture that does not tolerate sexual assault </li></ul><ul><li>Have tangible consequences </li></ul><ul><li>Stop coercive or questionable behavior </li></ul>
    26. 26. How can we lessen our organization’s risk? <ul><li>Buddy system </li></ul><ul><li>Watch your drink </li></ul><ul><li>Talk about the issues often </li></ul><ul><li>Create resources for members </li></ul><ul><li>http://studentorgs.utexas.edu/tea/risk </li></ul>
    27. 27. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Sexual Harassment/Misconduct Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin
    28. 28. Sexual Harassment/Misconduct <ul><li>Sexual Harassment is a form of sex discrimination that involves the imposition of an unwanted condition or requirement on the continued employment or education of the victim. Two forms of sexual harassment: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quid pro quo harassment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hostile environment harassment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sexual Misconduct is conduct of a sexual nature that, although not so serious or pervasive that it rises to the level of sexual harassment, is unprofessional and/or inappropriate for the educational and working environment. </li></ul>
    29. 29. Where can Sexual Harassment Occur? <ul><li>Sexual Harassment can occur anywhere on- or off-campus. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Not confined to particular location </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The number of incident at a location reflects the amount of time students spend there </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Among students who have been harassed: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>39% were in a dorm or student housing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>37% were outside on campus grounds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>24% were in common areas of campus buildings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>20% were in classrooms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>27% were “someplace else” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>12% were unsure where they were harassed </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. Sexual Harassment Dynamics <ul><li>1/5 of students say staff sexually harass students </li></ul><ul><li>68% of students say peers sexually harass other students </li></ul><ul><li>80% of sexually assaulted students were harassed by current students or alumni </li></ul>
    31. 31. If You Have Been Subjected to Sexual Harassment/Misconduct <ul><li>Confront the Offender </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Say you don’t want to </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask that it stop </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make the message clear </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If previously mentioned action is not feasible, successful, or if a student feels uncomfortable taking the above approach: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Report to UT </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>UT officials will address immediately </li></ul></ul>
    32. 32. How to Report Sexual Harassment <ul><li>You can report your sexual assault, or suspected/possible sexual assault, to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dr. LaToya Hill </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(512) 471-5017 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Linda Millstone </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(512) 471-1849 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul></ul></ul>
    33. 33. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Fire and Life Safety Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin
    34. 34. How to respond to a crisis at your event <ul><li>Call for help. </li></ul><ul><li>Stay calm. </li></ul><ul><li>Have information for police/911 operator </li></ul><ul><li>Contact the Office of the Dean of Students asap </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Helps with media response </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other help </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Call (512) 471-5017. </li></ul></ul>
    35. 35. Crime Prevention <ul><li>Blue light call boxes </li></ul><ul><li>Buddy system </li></ul><ul><li>Hide valuables in cars and lock doors </li></ul><ul><li>UTPD Resources </li></ul><ul><li>R.A.D. (Rape Aggression Defense) program class </li></ul><ul><li>Campus Watch e-mail newsletter </li></ul><ul><li>UTPD engraver to engrave belongings </li></ul><ul><li>UTPD for event security </li></ul><ul><li>Visit UTPD website at www.utexas.edu/police. </li></ul>
    36. 36. My friend is acting strange… <ul><li>Behavior Concerns Advice Line (BCAL) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(512) 232-5050 or www.utexas.edu/safety/bcal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For concerns about a member of the UT community. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be anonymous if calling the 24 hour line. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can submit a report on-line through the website, which requires a UT EID logon. </li></ul></ul>
    37. 37. If you see it…report it. <ul><li>Slippery floors </li></ul><ul><li>Water leaks </li></ul><ul><li>Broken glass </li></ul><ul><li>Strange odors (gas leak, fire, chemical, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Lights out </li></ul><ul><li>Broken doors and/or locks </li></ul><ul><li>Emergency equipment missing or not working </li></ul><ul><li>A person who doesn’t belong in a particular area </li></ul>
    38. 38. Weapons <ul><li>No weapons or fake weapons on campus </li></ul><ul><li>Must have advance permission from the Office of the Dean of Students. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/pses/downloads/WeaponsApprovalForm.pdf OR </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Call (512) 471-5017 </li></ul></ul>
    39. 39. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Student Organization Travel Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin
    40. 40. University Travel Policies (When does it apply?) <ul><li>SSO Travel Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Event >25 miles away </li></ul><ul><li>Sponsored student orgs </li></ul><ul><li>(THE TEA) </li></ul><ul><li>UT sponsored event with enrolled students attending </li></ul><ul><li>RSO Travel Policy </li></ul><ul><li>Event >25 miles away </li></ul><ul><li>Registered student orgs </li></ul><ul><li>Requires student to attend event </li></ul>
    41. 41. University Travel Policies (What are we required to do?) <ul><li>SSO Travel Policy </li></ul><ul><li>“ Request for student travel authorization” from UT Admin </li></ul><ul><li>Release/indemnification agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Authorization Form </li></ul><ul><li>Request for Special Event Health Insurance </li></ul><ul><li>RSO Travel Policy </li></ul><ul><li>“ Request for Information Sheet” for RSO travel </li></ul><ul><li>Travel information packet </li></ul><ul><li>Release/indemnification agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Medical Authorization Form </li></ul><ul><li>Request for Special Event Health Insurance </li></ul>
    42. 42. General Car Travel Tips <ul><li>Seat belts </li></ul><ul><li>No alcohol </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t exceed max car occupancy – law and UT policy </li></ul><ul><li>Drivers have valid drivers licenses/proof of insurance </li></ul><ul><li>Each vehicle has a current registration and emissions sticker. </li></ul>
    43. 43. General Air Travel Tips <ul><li>Carry state or fed ID </li></ul><ul><li>Follow carry-on rules, review prohibited items </li></ul><ul><li>Put ident info on belongings </li></ul><ul><li>Book lodgings in advance </li></ul><ul><li>Keeps expensive items as carry-on </li></ul><ul><li>Check the weather to plan clothes </li></ul><ul><li>Leave contact info with family or friends in case </li></ul><ul><li>Arrive early at the airport </li></ul><ul><li>Know emergency exits </li></ul>
    44. 44. General Emergency Procedures <ul><li>If you are involved in an accident: </li></ul><ul><li>Stop immediately and call 911 or local police </li></ul><ul><li>Help if needed </li></ul><ul><li>Fill out a police report </li></ul><ul><li>Obtain names/addresses of witnesses </li></ul><ul><li>Contact your advisor </li></ul><ul><li>Contact the Office of the Dean of Students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Student Emergency Services: (512) 471-5017 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student Activities & Leadership Development: (512) 471-3065 </li></ul></ul>
    45. 45. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Behavior at Parties and Other Organization Events Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin
    46. 46. Planning Tips to Remember <ul><li>When planning an event make sure to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reflect values of organization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Invite people/groups you know </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Appoint “event monitors” to handle emergencies/event details </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Appoint “designated drivers” for alcohol events </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Confront inappropriate behavior quickly and firmly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have an emergency/crisis management plan </li></ul></ul>
    47. 47. Factors to consider before planning a “Date” or “Slave” Auction <ul><li>No date or slave auctions, unless some special circumstances but generally forget about it </li></ul>
    48. 48. The Event Planner(s) <ul><li>Complex to manage finances/plan </li></ul><ul><li>Select officer/leader/committee to lead </li></ul><ul><li>Qualities of good event planners: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>experience within the organization; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>excellent organizational, communication and time management skills; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ability to handle stressful, fast-paced situations; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>passion and a strategic vision. </li></ul></ul>
    49. 49. Prohibited Student Conduct <ul><li>Harassment or discrimination against anyone </li></ul><ul><li>Damages/changes UT property with0ut permission </li></ul><ul><li>Impedes UT function (e.g., class, event) </li></ul><ul><li>Endangering anyone </li></ul><ul><li>Omitting or lying about identify </li></ul><ul><li>Unauthorized entry into university buildings or fountains </li></ul><ul><li>Engages in conduct that violates federal; state; and or local laws (e.g., theft, hazing, DWI, underage drinking) </li></ul><ul><li>(all the stuff that came before) </li></ul>
    50. 50. Tips for Etiquette at Professional Events <ul><li>Punctuality </li></ul><ul><li>No laptops/cell phones </li></ul><ul><li>Ask appropriate questions </li></ul><ul><li>Dress appropriately </li></ul><ul><li>Let each person have a chance to speak </li></ul><ul><li>Eat and drink in moderation </li></ul><ul><li>Do not monopolize people’s time – know what the purpose of the event is and come prepared </li></ul>
    51. 51. HB 2639 RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM Summary and Conclusion Program Safety Education Services ∙ Office of the Dean of Students ∙ Division of Student Affairs ∙ The University of Texas at Austin
    52. 52. Review: Campus Resources <ul><li>Free Wallet Cards Available </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Student Organization Risk Management Resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Emergency Information </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Content-Specific Web pages for Each Topic </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Training Resources - http://deanofstudents.utexas.edu/pses/hb2639rmep/trainres.php </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Office of the Dean of Students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Program Safety Education Services – (512) 471-5017 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student Activities and Leadership Development – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(512) 471-3065 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Greek Life and Intercultural Education – (512) 471-9700 </li></ul></ul>
    53. 53. Questions? <ul><li>All members must go online </li></ul><ul><li>and acknowledge learning all of this: </li></ul><ul><li>studentorgs.utexas.edu/tea/risk </li></ul><ul><li>Also, sign our attendance sheet </li></ul><ul><li>For extra records </li></ul>
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