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Given at ESA2011 in Natural History Symposium

Given at ESA2011 in Natural History Symposium

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Tewksbury2011 Tewksbury2011 Presentation Transcript

  • Department of Biology,University of e Natural HistoryWashington Initiative:College of theEnvironment, An IntroductionUniversity ofWashingtone Natural HistoryNetwork Josh TewksburyNCEAS e ideal scientist thinks like a poet and worksA naturalist is more like a bookkeeper. a poet than an (E.O. Wilson, 1998) engineer.(R. Margalef 1997)
  • Natural History: Attention to nature, from the scale of the organism to the scale of the landscape, and the body of honest, accessible work that comes from this attention. eory Experimental Manipulations Comparison (correlation) “Ecology is a new Descriptionname for a very old subject. It simply means scientific Observation natural history” -Elton 1927
  • Why we need natural history •  We need more naturalists and more natural history •  We need to use natural history more effectively •  We need to create value for natural history in contemporary culture“Isn’t it true that in an anthill dreams •  e Natural History Initiative are a duty?” - P. Neruda
  • Natural History: the backbone of discovery Gene Likens – Acid Rain First full facts,then interpretations- T. C. Chamberlain 1890
  • Natural History: the backbone of predictive ecology •  Natural History requires investment in our collective knowledge •  Without Natural History, we lack baselines.
  • Natural History: the backbone of predictive ecology •  Natural History requires investment in our collective knowledgeIxtoc Oil Spill, 1979,Bay of Campeche •  Without Natural - no long-term monitoring History, we lack (Schrope 2010) baselines.
  • Why we need natural history•  We need more naturalists and more natural history•  We need to use natural history more effectively•  We need to create value for natural history in contemporary culture•  e Natural History Initiative
  • Getting more from natural historywill require a cultural shift in ecology •  Observations of nature (data) –  Can build a predictive ecology –  Can transcend current theory •  If they are –  Honest –  Available –  Transparent •  Without a HAT, data in any field goes dark •  Ecology has a lot of dark data
  • How much do we share data in Ecology? •  Methods –  Randomly selected 100Stephanie Hampton NSF proposals in DEB (20 per year for last 5 years) –  Randomly selected one paper per proposal –  Performed exhaustiveCarly Strasser search for data sharing for each paper
  • Most of the data we collect remains in the dark •  Results –  60 papers produced newStephanie Hampton data –  Of these, 57% (34 papers) shared no data –  Only 5 papers (8%) sharedCarly Strasser any data outside of Genbank and Treebase (molecular and phylogenetic data repositories)
  • We are building the stadiums, butmost of us are not going to the games •  Getting out of the dark will require –  A sea change towards transparency and collaboration –  More incentive structures that reward the collection, the sharing and the synthesis of natural history –  A flattening of ecology (experts are where you find them, natural history is civics)
  • Why we need natural history •  We need more naturalists and more natural history •  We need to use natural history more effectively •  We need to create value for natural history in contemporary culture“Do  black  grapes  of  the   desert  have  a  basic   •  e Natural History Initiative thirst  for  tears?”   -­‐P.  Neruda  
  • Naturalists connecting ecology to society Images  from  Wikimedia  Commons  
  • e next generation of natural history must be… …more diverse, more agile, more collaborative, …immersed in contemporary culture and society and perceived by that culture and society as relevant and vital.“Recognize that politics with no biology, or politicswithout field biology, or a political platform in whichhuman biological requirements form but one plank,is a vision of the gates of hell.” - Barry Lopez
  • e next generation of natural history must be… …more diverse, more agile, more It must also be deeply collaborative, …immersed ininsurgent, an inoculation contemporary culture and society against the steady turn and perceived by that culture and away from nature society as vital and relevant. “Recognize that politics with no biology, or politics without field biology, or a political platform in which human biological requirements form but one plank, is a vision of the gates of hell.” - Barry Lopez
  • e core of natural history Practice; Patience; Attention to Nature; “…While you Accuracy; Organisms; and I have lips and voices which Landscapes; are for kissing, and to Observation; sing with, who cares if some one eyed son of a bitch Description; invents an instrument to Intuition; measure spring with” - EE Cummings Connections; Sense of place; Attention over time; Pattern recognition; Experiential; Curiosity driven; Sense of Self; Human Senses; Esthetics
  • “To pay attention,A 21stcentury vision this is our endless and proper work.” of natural history --Mary Oliver Practice; Patience; Practical; Inclusive; Social; Attention to Nature; Transparent; Experimental; Accuracy; Organisms; Embracing and Subverting Landscapes; New Technologies; Observation; Expansive and Accepting of Description; our Cyborg Senses; Intuition; Immersed in our multi- Connections; Sense of cultural society place; Attention over time; Pattern recognition; Experiential; Curiosity driven; Sense of Self; Human Senses; Esthetics
  • Natural History UpgradeBy Richard Conniff
  • Anexample…
  • Anexample… “Do  black  grapes  of  the  desert  have   a  basic  thirst  for  tears?”   (P.  Neruda)  
  • Why we need natural history•  We need more naturalists and more natural history•  We need to use natural history more effectively•  We need to create value for natural history in contemporary culture•  e Natural History Initiative
  • e Natural History Initiative•  Bringing naturalists together –  Removing distractions
  • e Natural History Initiative•  Bringing naturalists together –  Removing distractions –  Crossing disciplines
  • e Natural History Initiative•  Bringing naturalists together –  Crossing disciplines –  Removing distractions –  Open Space Technology
  • e Natural History Initiative•  Bringing naturalists together –  Crossing disciplines –  Removing distractions –  Open Space Technology –  Talking and doing natural history“How in salt’s desert is it possible to blossom?” P. Neruda
  • e Natural History Network National Science Foundatione University of Washington UW College of the EnvironmentPrescott CollegeBDSJS.COM Colosoma Beetle andNCEAS Graphite Shell byCannon USA Logan Parsons Bat Star and Poppy by Emily Eng http://www.parsonsillustration.com/ All art is used with permission and http://www.emilymeng.com/ in collaboration with the artists
  • e study of life at the level of the individual: e scientific study of of what plants and animals do, plants and animals inhow they react to each other and the environment their natural (Bates 1990) environments. It is concerned with levels of“e close observation of organisms—their origins, organization from the their evolution, their behavior, and their individual organism to relationships with other species” the ecosystem... It often (Wilcove and Eisner 2000) and appropriately includes an esthetic Natural history focuses on where organisms are component. and what they do in their environment, (Herman 2002) including interactions with other organisms (Greene and Losos 1988) Patient interrogation A practice of intentional, focused attentiveness of a landscape and receptivity to the more-than-human world, (Lopez 1986) guided by honesty and accuracy (Fleischner 2001)