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Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
Going from message nightmare to message delight
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Going from message nightmare to message delight

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A nightmarish scenario for product management/product marketing is to hear a multitude of different messages communicated to the market about your product. Executive management says one thing, the …

A nightmarish scenario for product management/product marketing is to hear a multitude of different messages communicated to the market about your product. Executive management says one thing, the sales team has a variety of messages and marketing is communicating yet another message. This results in significant marketplace confusion, impacts revenue generation and reflects poorly on your product. We like to blame others for this, but the likely reality is that we are at fault. As PMs, we must own the message and then enable the organization to take this message to the market.
In this presentation, we will have an interactive discussion on how to improve upon your message and then define best practices in enabling the sales team to communicate it.

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  • Thanks Sheryl - thanks for your comments during my PCamp session yesterday.
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  • Great presentation! Covers the bases and keeps it simple.
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  • 1. Copyright 2010- LÛCRUM MARKETING Going from Message Nightmare to Message Delight Presented by: Tom Evans Lûcrum Marketing November 2, 2010
  • 2. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING Presentation Agenda • Typical messaging nightmare scenario • Why this happens • What you (PM) can do • Exercise & discussion
  • 3. The Scenario Product (Smart Credit) targeted for credit issuers to better manage credit lines and interest rates based upon the credit risk of their clients/prospects, resulting in more balance build and less delinquencies and write-offs. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING “The events depicted in this presentation are fictitious. Any similarity to any person or company, living or dead is merely coincidental."
  • 4. The Lead • Sales meets an IT Manager of credit card issuer at a trade show. • IT Mngr – “I need a solution to detect payment fraud. Can you do it?” • Sales – “Yes we can!” • Sets face-to-face visit Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 5. The Prep • Sales to: – Marketing – create new collateral that shows “our payment fraud solution.” – Sales Engineer – create a new demo that shows “our payment fraud solution.” – Sales Engineer – help me with a new presentation about payment fraud. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 6. The Sales Presentation • PowerPoint Presentation – Let me tell you how great our company is. – Now, let me describe our Evolutionary Statistical Algorithm (ESA) and how great it is. • Demo of every conceivable feature (isn’t this neat). • IT Mngr – “Do you have feature A, B, C?” • Sales – “Yes we do” (liar) • IT Mngr – “Here is RFP, Send a proposal” Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 7. The Proposal • Sales to: – Marketing – create a new proposal template for payment fraud. – Sales Engineer - answer this RFP. – Engineering – We must have features A, B, C in the product now to win this deal. We have a final demo in three weeks. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 8. The Close • IT Mngr – “We think we are going with Competitor X who has the exact solution we need (and is being used by companies d, e, f).” • Sales - Discount the price! • Sales - Discount it some more! • Sales - Send in the cavalry (executive team) • Sales - Oops – we still lost it – Why? Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 9. The Why? • Opportunistic v. Targeted Opportunity • Sales message was technical v. speaking to business needs • Never engaged executive that owns the problem Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 10. The Impact • Wasted resources on an opportunity that was a long shot. • New features in the product that nobody needs. • A frustrated and irritated executive team. • Confusion in the market place on what the company does. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 11. Why do these nightmares happen? 1. That’s just the way sales people (& executives) are. 2. They were never properly enabled with the right, messages, knowledge and tools. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING PM
  • 12. Messaging Questions to Answer • How do you create a compelling message? • How do you get the company to use it consistently (Enablement)? Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 13. Survey Results: Question 1 • Does your company use a structured approach to creating market messages for your products/services? – Yes: 62% – No: 38% Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 14. Survey Results: Question 2 • Who in your organization owns the market messages, i.e., is responsible for defining them? (Select the BEST option) – Marketing Communications: 31% – Everyone: 8% – Product Marketing: 23% – Other: 23% – Executive Management: 15% – Product Management: 15% Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 15. Survey Results: Question 3 • When you launch a new product/service, what tools and approaches do you use to enable the sales team on how to sell it? – Demos, trade shows and simulations. – Data sheets, capabilities presentations, business development meetings – Combination of training webinars & sales collateral. – Positioning docs, user personas, distinctive competence, competitive analysis – Global sales team receives traditional and localized collateral and training materials (presentation, user guide, sell sheet, etc). Once a year HQ training to reinforce and re- train. – Product/service training (the sales people), support presentations, demo material – Training on messaging, value, competition, ... – Powerpoint presentations, Leave behind brochure, Product Samples, Website links Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 16. Six Steps to a Compelling Message 1. Who is our audience? 2. What are we selling? 3. Why should our customers care? 4. What we can do for our customers? 5. Why us? 6. Create your message(s) Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 17. Who is Our Audience? • The message must resonate with your target audience – Corollary: it will not (& shouldn’t) resonate with all market segments • Target market segments • Key Personas – Buyers, Influencers, Users – What do they care about – What language do they use – Typical profile/characteristics Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 18. What Are We Selling? • Relate to a known category or class of products • What it does – Problems your product solves best for that persona. – Identify features that solve their problem. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 19. Why Should Our Customers Care? • What are the buyers motivations (per buyer persona)? – Need, pain, goal, challenge, ideals – Personal & business – Articulated & unarticulated – What do they need to know to make a decision – How will they evaluate & use your product? Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 20. What We Can Do For Our Customers? • Value proposition – In terms of the customer – Benefits & value your customer will realize from purchase and use of your product – Relative to customer’s other viable alternatives Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 21. Why Us? • What makes your product stand out (differentiation) • Meaningful value to the customer • Sources of differentiation (& value): – Reference customers, industry expertise, internal processes, partnerships, innovation, IP, delivery methods, geography, social, business model, personnel, features, guarantees, brand promise, core competencies, etc. – Speaking to your customers Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 22. Create Your Message(s) • Per target buyer persona • In your customer’s language / Avoid meaningless words • Clear value to your customer / Clear differentiation that is valued by customers • 2 to 4 messages per persona • Compare with competitors • Validate with customer’s • Support with evidence Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 23. Typical Positioning Statement • For [target end user] • Who wants/needs [compelling reason to buy] • The [product name] is a [product category] • That provides [key benefit]. • Unlike [main competitor (s)], • The [product name] [key differentiation] Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 24. Goals of Sales Enablement • Ensures everyone (marketing, sales, executives) is marching to the beat of the same drum. • Defines clear target market. • Communicates clear & consistent messages. • Enables sales to talk with the right buyers. • Pursue target opportunities that company can win. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 25. Sales Enablement (Base Components) • Product Backgrounder • Sales Questioning Guide • Executive Level Presentation • Message Driven Demo Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 26. Product Backgrounder • Target Markets / Segments • Market Needs / Challenges • Buyer Profiles - Personas / Needs / Challenges / Goals • Market Messages – Positioning Statement – Value Proposition – Messages Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 27. Sales Questioning Guide • Aka - Pain Sheets / Solution Development Prompters • One per buyer role per market segment • Challenges / Impact / Capability / Benefits • Match to your sales methodology (if any) • User buyer’s language/terms Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 28. Executive Level Presentation • Market / Buyer needs • High level discussion of how your solution addresses needs. • Benefits / Value Proposition • Case Study • Remember the key messages • 10 to 15 slides Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 29. Message Driven Demo • Communicates key messages. • Show how buyers needs are solved. • Build it as story. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 30. Now What? • How do you get sales to use these new tools? – Have an executive sponsor (Sales VP/CEO). – Train them and train them some more. – Test them on their knowledge via certification process. – Make the tools real (not ivory tower). Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING Enhances your role as market expert.
  • 31. Exercise • Messaging Grid • Product Backgrounder • Sales Questioning Guide Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING
  • 32. Copyright 2010 - LÛCRUM MARKETING Thank You Tom Evans Lûcrum Marketing tevans@lucrum-marketing.com +1-512-961-5267

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