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Respect as an architectural issue: a case-study in business survival

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The client: a large bank in Latin America. The business problem: loss of respect of the company in the market and the broader community, plummeting from highest to lowest in the region in a matter of …

The client: a large bank in Latin America. The business problem: loss of respect of the company in the market and the broader community, plummeting from highest to lowest in the region in a matter of months, with impacts throughout all aspects of the business. This real-life case study explores, step-by-step, the actual practices and underlying architecture principles that were used to tackle a major strategic issue with enterprise-wide scope, and set the groundwork for subsequent process development.

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  • @popcycle really glad to hear that it helped - many thanks!
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  • Tom,
    I have to say that after studying EA for the past 6 weeks. Your ppt has summarized it to the basics. I now am sparked with new thoughts to implient to my team for the new year. Thanks
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  • Hello Tom,
    I liked it that you use the metafor forming/storming stages. It gives a good perspective to groupsdynamic and architecture.
    peter hepp
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  • Tetradian Consulting Unit 215, Communications House 9 St Johns Street Colchester Essex CO2 7NN England www.tetradian.com weblog.tetradian.com [email_address] Twitter: @tetradian © Tom Graves / Tetradian 2010
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    • 1. Respect as an architectural issue - a case-study in business survival Tom Graves , Tetradian Consulting IRM-EAC London, June 2011 info@tetradian.com / www.tetradian.com 12 Jun 2011 (c) Tom Graves / Tetradian 2011
    • 2. Scope of enterprise-architecture (this, we’re often told, is the entire scope of enterprise-architecture )
    • 3. Scope of enterprise-architecture (complete EA includes many other intersecting ‘ architectures ’ – security, process, brand, organisation etc)
    • 4. Enterprise-architecture beyond IT
      • EA often starts with IT infrastructure , but...
      • IT tech-architecture depends on applications
      • Applications-architecture depends on data
      • Data-architecture depends on business-info need
      • Information-architecture depends on business
      • Business-architecture depends on enterprise
      • Enterprise-architecture defines the context
      • An enterprise-architecture must have whole-of-enterprise scope – it ’ s not just detail-level IT!
    • 5. A question of maturity 12 Jun 2011 (c) Tom Graves / Tetradian 2010 (adapted from maturity-model in TOGAF 9, chapter 51)
    • 6. TOGAF scope in maturity-model 12 Jun 2011 (c) Tom Graves / Tetradian 2010 TOGAF 8.1 TOGAF 9 (...everything else is just ‘detail stuff’) Main emphasis of TOGAF, for IT-architecture only ‘ Big-picture’ strategy Pain-points + wicked-problems But business most wants us to work on these...
    • 7. The business problem “ Loss of respect ” – fallen from most-respected bank in region to least-respected bank
    • 8. Symptoms …
      • Deterioration in customer relations
      • Deterioration in government relations
      • Deterioration in community relations
      • Severe loss of morale in all staff areas
      • Difficulties in recruiting and retention
      • Unresolved operational, technical and cultural problems from previous merger with other bank
      • No real strategy to address any of this...
      • All of these having significant, identifiable impacts on bottom-line performance
    • 9. … and requests
      • Request is from Organizational Development unit:
      • Identify the problem-areas
      • Identify ‘anchors to unify the tribes’
      • Create experience in use of whole-enterprise view and whole-system techniques
      • Prepare executive-team for real strategy-work
      • Combined effort of business-transformation and enterprise-architecture
      • (will include IT-architectures etc at a later date, when business-issues have been identified)
    • 10. Stage 1: Meeting with executive-team
    • 11. First meeting …
      • One-day offsite for 32-person executive team, but :
      • Participants wander in at random, up to half an hour after scheduled start
      • People answer their phones, texting, jump out of meeting to take calls
        • CEO is worst offender in this – probably >10 times...
      • CIO sits off to one side, isolated from the team, using her laptop throughout most of the day
      • A simple question:
      • how does this reflect respect within org itself?
    • 12. Five Elements in all organisations (adapted from classic Group Dynamics project-lifecycle)
    • 13. Five Elements workshop
      • Provides a quick, experiential means to introduce systems-thinking to practical business-folk:
      • Describe roles within each ‘element’
      • Describe the ‘other’ roles from each role
        • “ we’re right, everyone else is wrong”
      • “ All move round one” – suddenly feels ‘unfair’
      • Different views, roles, time-perspectives
        • these arise from the work itself
      • What happens if one ‘element’ dominates?
      • What happens if no-one keeps the balance?
    • 14. Working with Five Elements (Five Element workshop in progress, for a different organisation)
    • 15. Functional Business Model (typical Functional Business Model, for a different organisation) Describe the structure of the work, how each part relates to other parts, and who is responsible
    • 16. How is this business structured? (Functional Business Model process, with photos, for a different client)
    • 17. Music as metaphor
      • Powerful experience of interdependence in org’n
      • Basic exercises – hit the beat, simple sequence
        • need to listen to each other, and to instructions
      • Complications – orchestrating multiple sequences
        • align with own team, yet also listen to others
      • Complexity – interweaving patterns
        • respond as a collective to natural ‘unorder’
      • Freeform ‘chaos’ – adapting in the moment
        • real-time responsibility for ‘feel’ of the whole
      • Aligns strongly with Latin culture, though can also be used elsewhere
    • 18. Music as metaphor (music as metaphor for team-coordination – executive-team from another organisation)
    • 19. Stage 2: Set-piece with frontline staff
    • 20. Out in the firing-line … (workshop-facilitator in theatre with 400 frontline staff)
    • 21. Getting issues out into the open … (each group described their issues and challenges at work)
    • 22. What ’ s going on for the front line?
      • A very broad range of unaddressed issues:
      • Loss of morale – e.g. “I’m embarrassed to tell my friends that I work for the bank...”
      • Clashing imperatives – e.g. issue credit-cards vs withdraw credit, confused risk-management
      • Clashing performance-metrics between teams
      • Cultural mismatch – individual vs collective
      • Operational / IT-issues – e.g. multiple apps needed for single task, manual crosslinks needed
      • ...all with real impacts on business effectiveness
    • 23. Stage 3: Back with the executive-team
    • 24. Back to the future...
      • Another one-day offsite with the executive...
      • Report from the frontline – ‘bad news’ that they could not afford to ignore
      • Organisation vs enterprise – create a better understanding of their place in business world
      • The market-cycle – where respect and trust come from, and why they’re crucial for business
      • The structure of strategy – why their current ‘non-strategy’ could not create success – and what to do next to make it work
      • ...and this time they did turn up on time!
    • 25. Organisation and enterprise
      • We create an architecture for an organisation, but about an enterprise:
      • Enterprise : a social structure defined by vision, values, mutual commitments
      • Organisation : a legal structure defined by rules, roles, responsibilities
      • The enterprise is – provides motivation , WHY
      • The organisation does – provides action , HOW
      • They’re fundamentally different – don ’ t mix them up!
    • 26. Organisation as ‘ the enterprise ’
      • From a business perspective, this is the effective scope of TOGAF ’ s ‘ business architecture ’
    • 27. Business-model as ‘ the enterprise ’
      • Typical business-model or supply-chain view (complete supply-chain should extend beyond this)
    • 28. Market as ‘ the enterprise ’
      • Overall market includes actors who do not yet have active transactions with us, or have other transactions
    • 29. The real scope of ‘ the enterprise ’
      • The overall enterprise has many actors who may have only ‘ intangible ’ transactions / interactions with us (yet can have major impacts on our business)
    • 30. The market-cycle
      • transactions depend on (reaffirmed) reputation and trust
      • – loss of trust creates anti-clients!
      boundary of ‘market’ in conventional business-models
    • 31. Strategy, tactics, operations (overall cycle and relationships need to be in balance)
    • 32. The ‘ quick-money ’ failure-cycle (common source of ‘unexpected’ failure – focus only on immediate profit, with classic “ last year +10% ” used as a substitute for strategy)
    • 33. Completions and the market-cycle
      • Production-focus, market-focus, enterprise-focus?
      Focus only on Production Focus on Market and its transactions
    • 34. The structure of vision
      • Vision is the overall anchor for everything
        • ‘ vision ’ in the ISO9000 sense – not ‘ marketing puff ’
      • Vision-descriptor has distinct 3-part structure
        • focus [noun]: context or things of concern to everyone
        • action [verb]: what is to be done to or in the focus
        • qualifier [adjective]: why this is important to everyone
      • Example: ‘ ideas worth spreading ’ (TED conferences)
        • ‘ ideas ’ (focus)
        • ‘ worth ’ (qualifier)
        • ‘ spreading ’ (action)
      • Components may be in any order, but all must be present
    • 35. Putting themselves on the line …
      • Visioning was a huge struggle...
      • Could not break free from self-centrism – kept reverting to standard ‘marketing puff’
      • After three hours... – finally arrived a vision-statement that was fully enterprise-inclusive
        • ‘ creating better financial futures’
      • Another real challenge (but a happier one!)
      • Performing music for families and colleagues
        • simple percussion, as in the previous sessions
      • ... provided a first-hand reminder of what it’s like to be out there on the business front-line
    • 36. Business outcomes
    • 37. What happens next?
      • Practical outcomes for Organisational Development
      • Executive did create a true business-strategy – for the first time ever, apparently...
      • Leveraging vision – as a guide and descriptor for all enterprise relationships
      • Rethinking culture – creating shared-learning between executive and front-line
      • Rethinking performance-metrics – a joint effort between OrgDev, HR, BPM, IT and others
      • ...and yes, some of this did link into the existing IT-centric ‘enterprise-architecture’
    • 38. Summary
      • The real key to enterprise-architecture is enterprise culture
      • Architecture is for an organisation, but is always about the whole enterprise
      • Always start from a real business-problem
        • in this case, the loss of respect in the marketplace
      • Keep the focus on one area at a time, but always remain aware of the whole
      • A real enterprise-architecture begins and ends with people – not solely the enterprise-IT
    • 39. Many thanks!
    • 40. Further detail: books by Tom Graves
      • Doing Enterprise Architecture : process and practice in the real enterprise
      • Everyday Enterprise Architecture : sensemaking, strategy, structures and solutions
      • Mapping the Enterprise : modelling the enterprise as services with the Enterprise Canvas
      • Bridging the Silos : enterprise architecture for IT-architects
      • The Service Oriented Enterprise : enterprise architecture and viable systems
      • Real Enterprise Architecture : beyond IT to the whole enterprise
      • SEMPER and SCORE : enhancing enterprise effectiveness
      • Power and Response-ability : the human side of systems
      • ( see tetradianbooks.com for details )
      12 Jun 2011 (c) Tom Graves / Tetradian 2010