The NCCN Written Identity
and Usage Guidelines
To help solidify the National Comprehensive Cancer Network®
’s (NCCN®’
s) b...
Table of Contents
Section 1: NCCN Boilerplate and Mission Page 3
Section 2: NCCN Member Institutions Page 4
Section 3: NCC...
Section 1: NCCN Boilerplate and Mission
The NCCN boilerplate and mission are the standard descriptions of the organization...
City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center
Los Angeles, California
2 lines – City of Hope Comprehensive
Cancer Center
Dana-F...
The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins
Baltimore, Maryland
2 lines – The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensi...
St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/University of Tennessee Cancer Institute
Memphis, Tennessee
2 lines – St. Jude Child...
Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center
Nashville, Tennessee
2 lines – Vanderbilt-Ingram
Cancer Center
Section 3: NCCN Programs an...
o When describing the NCCN Annual Conference and NCCN Annual Congress – be sure to use superscript,
trademark, and when ap...
First occurrence: NCCN Guidelines Update Webinar Series™: Kidney Cancer
Second occurrence: NCCN Guidelines Webinar
First o...
Kidney Cancer (Panel: Kidney/Testicular Cancer)
Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma
Melanoma
Multiple Myeloma
Myelodysplastic S...
o NCCN Task Force: Oral Chemotherapy
o NCCN Task Force: Breast Cancer in the Older Woman
o NCCN Task Force: mTOR
2009:
o N...
Eva Lepisto, MSc Vice President, Technology Research & Development
Edward Li, PharmD, BCOP Manager, Oncology Pharmacy
Jenn...
Allos Therapeutics, Inc.
Amgen Inc. (Amgen Oncology)
Antigenics Inc.
ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Array BioPharma Inc
Astra...
Schering-Plough Corporation
Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Spectrum Pharmaceuticals
Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp.
The Bindi...
ARIAD Pharmaceuticals
AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP
Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Biogen idec
Boehringer Ingelhe...
To cite NCCN Guidelines accessed from the website, reproduced with permission by NCCN, follow this example:
The NCCN Clini...
Designations
Insert commas after final designation when used in a sentence.
Examples: Al B. Benson III, MD
Paul F. Engstro...
Alphabetical List of Preferred Usage
• AM (small caps, no periods) / PM (small caps, no periods)
• CD-ROM, CD-ROMs
• e-mai...
We evaluated 314 cases of …
Other Instances
over vs. more than: Use “more than” when a number is involved. Use “over” to i...
Section 11: NCCN Fact Sheet and Messaging
NCCN Boilerplate
The National Comprehensive Cancer Network®
(NCCN®
), a not-for-...
NCCN is developing a library of chemotherapy order templates to improve the safe and effective use of drugs and
biologics ...
strategies for navigating the various constituencies in cancer care and are better able to serve their customers upon
comp...
Investigator Steering Committee, a group comprised of senior research physicians appointed by each NCCN Member
Institution...
aggressive, or uncommon cancers. The NCCN Member Institution Profiles™ references the areas of expertise, pediatric
oncolo...
NCCN Flash Updates™
NCCN Flash Updates™ is a new service from NCCN that provides timely access to updated and new informat...
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  1. 1. The NCCN Written Identity and Usage Guidelines To help solidify the National Comprehensive Cancer Network® ’s (NCCN®’ s) brand identity and to avoid confusion both internally and for our varied audiences, please use the approved language outlined in these guidelines for written materials relating to NCCN and its programs. Developing the NCCN Written Identity and Usage Guidelines will be an ongoing process; updates and revisions will be available on sharedNCCN ToolsNCCN Written and Graphic Guidelines or on-line at NCCN.org/identity. NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 1
  2. 2. Table of Contents Section 1: NCCN Boilerplate and Mission Page 3 Section 2: NCCN Member Institutions Page 4 Section 3: NCCN Programs and Resources Page 7  “The”  Trademarks & Registered marks Section 4: NCCN LOGO and Stationery Templates Page 9 Section 5: Lists of NCCN Guidelines, NCCN Guidelines Panels and NCCN Task Forces Page 9 Section 6: NCCN Staff Page 11 Section 7: Supporters, Exhibitors and Industry Advisory Roundtable Page 12 Section 8: Citing NCCN Information Page 15 Section 9: Punctuation Page 15  Capitalization  Commas  Designations  Hyphens, En dashes, and Em dashes Section 10: Style and Usage Page 17  Address and telephone information  Alphabetical List of Preferred Usage  Dates  Geographical Designations  Lists  Number Usage  Other Instances  Press Releases  Referring to Age, Gender, and Ethnicity Section 11: NCCN Fact Sheet and Messaging Page 20 Please note: Designed pieces and the website do not need to adhere to these guidelines in all instances. Of course, the names and titles of NCCN programs and resources, NCCN Member Institutions, and personnel should always be consistently used. When in doubt, please consult with NCCN marketing staff. NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 2
  3. 3. Section 1: NCCN Boilerplate and Mission The NCCN boilerplate and mission are the standard descriptions of the organization. If you need to describe NCCN in written materials, use the approved boilerplate or mission below. Depending on the situation (ex: press releases), you may also include the list of NCCN Member Institutions in paragraph form. NCCN Boilerplate The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN® ), a not-for-profit alliance of 21 of the world’s leading cancer centers, is dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of care provided to patients with cancer. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The primary goal of all NCCN initiatives is to improve the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of oncology practice so patients can live better lives. For more information, visit NCCN.org. NCCN Mission The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN® ) is dedicated to improving care along the continuum of cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. An alliance of 21 of the world’s leading cancer centers, NCCN communicates sound, evaluative clinical information to enhance the decision-making processes of patients, physicians, and others who influence access to and the choice of cancer care. NCCN Member Institutions (in paragraph form) The NCCN Member Institutions are: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/University of Tennessee Cancer Institute, Memphis, TN; Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN. Section 2: NCCN Member Institutions The members of NCCN should always be referred to as “NCCN Member Institutions.” Note that “NCCN Member Institution(s)” should be capitalized. The names of NCCN Member Institutions are to be written as they appear on the NCCN letterhead. For spacing purposes on the map, “University” is often abbreviated “U.” and NCCN Member Institution names are broken onto 3 or 4 lines. Always spell out “University” and use the least amount of lines breaks for each NCCN Member Institution listing. The proper alphabetical listing of NCCN Member Institutions is below. Please note: Any name change must be approved by the NCCN’s Chief Operating Officer (COO). Please contact the COO if you discover any name discrepancies. NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 3
  4. 4. City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center Los Angeles, California 2 lines – City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center Boston, Massachusetts 2 lines – Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center 3 lines – Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center |Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center 4 lines – Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center Durham, North Carolina 2 lines – Duke Comprehensive Cancer Center Fox Chase Cancer Center Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2 lines – Fox Chase Cancer Center Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 2 lines – Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah 3 lines – Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance Seattle, Washington 2 lines – Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/ Seattle Cancer Care Alliance -OR- Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance 3 lines – Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance -OR- Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/ Seattle Cancer Care Alliance NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 4
  5. 5. The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Baltimore, Maryland 2 lines – The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins 3 lines – The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University Chicago, Illinois 2 lines – Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University 3 lines – Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center New York, New York 2 lines – Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute Tampa, Florida 2 lines – H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute Columbus, Ohio 3 lines – The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute 4 lines – The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute Roswell Park Cancer Institute Buffalo, New York 2 lines – Roswell Park Cancer Institute Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine St. Louis, Missouri 2 lines – Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine 3 lines – Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes- Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine 4 lines – Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 5
  6. 6. St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/University of Tennessee Cancer Institute Memphis, Tennessee 2 lines – St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/ University of Tennessee Cancer Institute 4 lines – St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital/ University of Tennessee Cancer Institute Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center Stanford, California 2 lines – Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center Birmingham, Alabama 2 lines – University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center 3 lines – University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center 4 lines – University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center San Francisco, California 2 lines – UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center Ann Arbor, Michigan 2 lines – University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center 3 lines – University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center Omaha, Nebraska 2 lines – UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center 3 lines – UNMC Eppley Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Houston, Texas 2 lines – The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 6
  7. 7. Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center Nashville, Tennessee 2 lines – Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center Section 3: NCCN Programs and Resources NCCN programs and resources include: (branding examples below do not include all programs) • NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) o The Complete Library of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) March 2010 • NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium™) • NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates (NCCN Templates™) • National, Regional, and International Educational Conferences and Symposia o NCCN (15th ) Annual Conference: Clinical Practice Guidelines & Quality Cancer Care™  2010 NCCN Nursing Program: Role of the Advanced Practice Nurse in Quality Cancer Care™  2010 NCCN Fellows Program: New Horizons in Quality Cancer Care™  2010 NCCN Pharmacy Program: Best Practices in Oncology Pharmacy Management™ o NCCN (5th ) Annual Congress: Hematologic Malignancies™ o NCCN Guidelines Update Webinar Series™: Kidney Cancer o NCCN 2010 Congress Series: Breast Cancer™ o NCCN Academy for Excellence & Leadership in Oncology™ School of Pharmaceutical & Biotech Business • JNCCN – The Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network • NCCN Oncology Research Program • NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database • NCCN Member Institution Profiles™ A reference guide for cancer case managers • Managed Care Collaborations • NCCN Oncology Case Management Program™ • GUS™ • NCCN Flash Updates™ • NCCN Trends™ Surveys & Data • NCCN Oncology Insights Reports™ • NCCN Resource Tool: Risk Evaluation & Mitigation Strategies (REMS) • NCCN Virtual Reimbursement Resource Room • NCCN.org • NCCN.com • NCCN Treatment Summaries for People with Cancer™ • NCCN Guidelines for Patients™ : Breast Cancer Approved language describing these programs or resources can be found in the NCCN Annual Report, on-line at NCCN.org, or on sharedNCCN ToolsNCCN Written and Graphic Guidelines Please note: o The proper line breaks NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 7
  8. 8. o When describing the NCCN Annual Conference and NCCN Annual Congress – be sure to use superscript, trademark, and when applicable, use “&” instead of “and” o JNCCN – The Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network or JNCCN is always in italics. o Underlining NCCN.org and NCCN.com in text may be used at the discretion of the designer. Use of “The” In most circumstances, “NCCN” is used as a proper name. Therefore, we are moving away from using “the” before NCCN. An exception is when NCCN is used as an adjective in a sentence and the noun after it would ordinarily require “the.” Examples: See NCCN’s official brochure for examples of when not to use “the.” But, See the NCCN brochure for examples…. Note: The difference is the possessive use of NCCN, again as a proper name. If “the” is used, the “t” should be lowercase when it does not appear at the beginning of a sentence. Use of Registered Mark & NCCN The registered mark needs to appear both next to the full name and abbreviation of NCCN in the first occurrence of the organization. Example: First occurrence: National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN® ) Second occurrence: NCCN Use of Trademarks Only use trademarks with NCCN programs and resources that are trademarked. The first reference of a trademarked program will use the trademark symbol and proper name. Second occurrences of the program within the same document do not need the trademark symbol, except in the case of NCCN Content (NCCN Guidelines™, NCCN Compendium™, NCCN Templates™ GUS™, NCCN Flash Updates™, NCCN Trends™ Surveys & Data, NCCN Oncology Insights Reports™). Third and subsequent occurrences of NCCN Content within the same document do not need to be trademarked (see examples below). Please reference the list of NCCN Programs and Resources to see the proper use of trademarks. Examples: First occurrence: NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) Second occurrence: NCCN Guidelines™ Third and subsequent occurrences: NCCN Guidelines First occurrence: NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium™) Second occurrence: NCCN Compendium™ Third and subsequent occurrences: NCCN Compendium First occurrence: NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates (NCCN Templates™) Second occurrence: NCCN Templates™ Third and subsequent occurrences: NCCN Templates First occurrence: NCCN (15th ) Annual Conference: Clinical Practice Guidelines & Quality Cancer Care™ Second occurrence: The NCCN Annual Conference (“T” at beginning of a sentence) First occurrence: NCCN (5th ) Annual Congress: Hematologic Malignancies™ Second occurrence: The NCCN Annual Congress (“T” at the beginning of a sentence) First occurrence: NCCN Treatment Summaries for People with Cancer™ Second occurrence: NCCN Treatment Summaries NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 8
  9. 9. First occurrence: NCCN Guidelines Update Webinar Series™: Kidney Cancer Second occurrence: NCCN Guidelines Webinar First occurrence: NCCN 2010 Congress Series: Breast Cancer™ Second occurrence: NCCN Congress Series First occurrence: NCCN Trends™ Surveys & Data Second occurrence: NCCN Trends™ Correct Usage: First Occurrence: NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™ ) Breast Cancer Second Occurrence: NCCN Guidelines™ for Breast Cancer Third Occurrence: NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer *The above is how the NCCN Guidelines should be referenced in a written sentence. However there are instances (e.g. Pocket Guides, Slide Decks, etc…) when they may be referred to as NCCN Guidelines™ Breast Cancer with no “for”. Incorrect Usage: NCCN Breast Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines™ NCCN Breast Cancer Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology™ Breast Cancer: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology™ Exceptions when the registered or trademark may be omitted: • In the subject line of an email (increases the risk of SPAM) • In the headline of a press release (can skew SEO) Section 4: NCCN LOGO and Stationery Templates All file requests for the NCCN LOGO must be processed through the marketing department or can be accessed at NCCN.org/identity/logos.asp. Approved stationery templates can be found under sharedNCCN ToolsForms 2009. Do not alter placement of logo, text or listing of the NCCN Member Institutions in any way. Section 5: Lists of NCCN Guidelines™ , NCCN Guidelines Panels, and NCCN Task Forces Correct NCCN Guidelines™ and NCCN Guidelines Panels names are listed below. NCCN Guidelines™ (and Panels): Cancer Treatment Guidelines Acute Myeloid Leukemia Bladder Cancer Bone Cancer Breast Cancer Central Nervous System Cancers Cervical Cancer (Panel: Cervical/Uterine Cancer) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Colon/Rectal/Anal Cancers Esophageal Cancer (Panel: Esophageal/Gastric Cancer) Gastric Cancer (Panel: Esophageal/Gastric Cancer) Head and Neck Cancers Hepatobiliary Cancers Hodgkin Lymphoma NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 9
  10. 10. Kidney Cancer (Panel: Kidney/Testicular Cancer) Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Melanoma Multiple Myeloma Myelodysplastic Syndromes Neuroendocrine Tumors Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas Non-Melanoma Skin Cancers Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Occult Primary Ovarian Cancer Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Prostate Cancer Small Cell Lung Cancer Soft Tissue Sarcoma Testicular Cancer (Panel: Kidney/Testicular Cancer) Thymic Malignancies Thyroid Carcinoma Uterine Neoplasms (Panel: Cervical/Uterine Cancer) Guidelines for Detection, Prevention, & Risk Reduction Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Breast Cancer Screening and Diagnosis Cervical Cancer Screening Colorectal Cancer Screening Genetic/Familial High-Risk Assessment: Breast and Ovarian Prostate Cancer Early Detection Guidelines for Supportive Care Adult Cancer Pain Antiemesis Cancer- and Chemotherapy-Induced Anemia Cancer-Related Fatigue Distress Management Myeloid Growth Factors Palliative Care Prevention and Treatment of Cancer-Related Infections Senior Adult Oncology Venous Thromboembolic Disease Inactive Panel: Nutritional Support Survivorship Pediatric Cancer Pain NCCN Task Forces: 2004: o NCCN Task Force: Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) 2006: o NCCN Task Force: Bone Health in Cancer Care o NCCN Task Force: Adjuvant Therapy in Breast Cancer o NCCN Task Force: HER2 Testing in Breast Cancer 2007: o NCCN Task Force: Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) o NCCN Task Force: PET/CT Scanning in Cancer 2008: o NCCN Task Force: Prevention and Management of Mucositis in Cancer Care NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 10
  11. 11. o NCCN Task Force: Oral Chemotherapy o NCCN Task Force: Breast Cancer in the Older Woman o NCCN Task Force: mTOR 2009: o NCCN Task Force: Bone Health in Cancer Care o NCCN Task Force: Integration of ER/PR Tumor Markers into Treatment Planning for Breast Cancer o NCCN Task Force: Management of Dermatologic Toxicity Associated with EGFR Inhibition in Patients with Cancer o NCCN Task Force: Molecular Markers in Leukemia and Lymphoma Section 6: NCCN Staff Occasionally you may need to refer to a staff member in written materials. The list below includes staff name preferences and correct titles. Note: Only capitalize the title when it precedes the person's name (e.g., “Communications Specialist Megan Martin reported…,” but “Megan Martin, communications specialist at…”). Margaret Abdalian Executive Assistant Christopher Adams, MS Program Manager Kathryn Barker Communications Coordinator Mary Anne Bergman Project Coordinator, Guidelines Programs Marian Birkeland, PhD Oncology Scientist/Molecular Medicine Michael Blake Assistant Director, Information Technology Sarah Bobiak, PhD Biostatistician Kimberly A. Callan, MS, ELS Senior Director, Professional and Patient Publications Rachel Clarke Medical Copyeditor, Drugs & Biologics Eileen Connolly, CPA, MBA Controller Kristie A. Cortazzo Project Coordinator Elizabeth Danielson, MHA Director, Payor Relations Jessica DeMartino, PhD Manager, Health Policy Programs Shannon DeVader, MPH Project Manager Jean Marie Dougherty Executive Assistant Mary Dwyer, MS Guidelines Coordinator Nicole Fair CME Specialist C. Lyn Fitzgerald, MJ Vice President, U.S. & Global Development Lauren Gallagher, PhD Manager, Drugs & Biologics Programs Elisabeth Ganiszewski Administrative Coordinator Mark Geisler Director, Conferences & Meetings Marisa Getzewich Business Development Specialist Patricia Goldsmith Executive Vice President/Chief Operating Officer David Goodman, PhD Director, NCCN Foundation Kerrin Green, MA Assistant Managing Editor Kristina M. Gregory, RN, MSN Vice President, Clinical Information Operations Debra Hampton Manager, Oncology Research Program Genevieve M. Hartzman, MA Editorial Associate Kristin Kline Hasson Senior Manager, Media Programs Maria Ho, PhD Oncology Scientist/Senior Medical Writer Miranda Hughes, PhD Oncology Scientist/Senior Medical Writer Jean M. Iannarelli Administrative Coordinator Joseph M. Junod, MBA Assistant Director, Information Technology Lisa G. Kimbro, CPA, MBA Senior Vice President, Finance / Chief Financial Officer Jessica Klink Grants Financial Analyst Rashmi Kumar, PhD Oncology Scientist/Senior Medical Writer Jonathan Larsen Program Coordinator Jody LaVerdure Grants Specialist Linda L. Leach Director, Administration & Human Resources NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 11
  12. 12. Eva Lepisto, MSc Vice President, Technology Research & Development Edward Li, PharmD, BCOP Manager, Oncology Pharmacy Jennifer Lyle Operations Project Manager Joseph MacAfee Technical Support Specialist Christine MacCracken Director, Business Insights Megan Martin Communications Manager Anju Mathew, PharmD Oncology Scientist, Drugs & Biologics Programs Jennifer McCann Senior Manager, Conferences & Meetings Robert McClain Programmer Joan S. McClure, MS Senior Vice President, Clinical Information & Publications Kelly McClurg Accounts Payable Coordinator Erin McGivney Office Clerk William T. McGivney, PhD Chief Executive Officer Dierdre McKee, MPH Director, Continuing Medical Education and Grants Jane McMichael Administrative Assistant, Guidelines Nicole McMillian, MS Guidelines Coordinator Diane McPherson Meeting Coordinator Susan Moench, PhD Oncology Scientist/Senior Medical Writer Melanie Moletzsky Receptionist Susan Most, RN, BSN, MBA Clinical Research Manager, Oncology Research Program Jill A. Mullen, MPA Senior Manager, Corporate Communications & Policy Janet Nikowitz Quality Assurance Manager Janice O’Connor Senior Manager, Creative Services Diane Paul, MS, RN Vice President, Oncology Research Program Liz Rieder Senior Registration Manager Kelly Rogers Grants Manager Lynn Rubin, MS Continuing Education Program Manager Shannon Ryan Meeting Planner Sam Saltzman Senior Applications Developer Donna Scharff Research Study Associate, Oncology Research Program Dorothy A. Shead, MS Associate Director, Clinical Information Operations Stephen Sherman Program Manager, Best Practices Mark Shriver Junior Programmer Analyst Kelly Simpson Manager, Global Initiatives Susan Sommerville Executive Coordinator Hema Sundar, PhD Oncology Scientist/Senior Medical Writer Elizabeth Sweeney Project Manager Kathleen Townsend Assistant Director, Information Technology Jennifer P. Tredwell, MBA Senior Manager Marketing & Communications Janice D. Tucker Financial Analyst Jonathan Vandergrift, MS Senior Analyst Doreen Walker Administrative Assistant, Oncology Research Program Carrie Zornosa, MSPH Project Manager, Oncology Outcomes Database Section 7: Supporters, Exhibitors and Corporate Council Below is a list of pharmaceutical, biotech, health care and medical device companies that have either provided support for an NCCN program or exhibited at an NCCN event. Never abbreviate company names in written materials. To ensure correct name usage, please check with Marisa Getzewich before referring to any of the companies listed below. Supporters and Exhibitors Pharmaceutical and Biotech Companies Abraxis BioScience, Inc. (Abraxis Oncology) Abbott Laboratories Abraxis Oncology Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 12
  13. 13. Allos Therapeutics, Inc. Amgen Inc. (Amgen Oncology) Antigenics Inc. ARIAD Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Array BioPharma Inc AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP (AstraZeneca) Avax Technologies, Inc. Bayer HealthCare (Bayer HealthCare Asia Pacific; Bayer Pharmaceuticals Corporation; Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals) Baxter International Inc. BioCryst Pharmaceuticals Biogen Idec Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. BrainLAB Bristol-Myers Squibb Company Celgene Corporation Cell Genesys, Inc Centocor, Inc. Cephalon, Inc. (Cephalon Oncology) Cubist Pharmaceuticals Cytogen Corporation Cytyc Health Corporation Dendreon Corporation DOR BioPharma, Inc. Eisai Inc. Eli Lilly and Company Enzon Pharmaceuticals Exelixis Inc. Genentech, Inc. (Genentech BioOncology) Genomic Health, Inc. GenPath Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Genzyme Corporation GlaxoSmithKline GPC Inc. Hana Biosciences, Inc. Hospira ImClone Systems Incorporated Inotek Pharmaceuticals Corporation Jannsen Pharmaceutica Products, LP Kosan Biosciences Merck & Co., Inc. (Merck Oncology) MGI PHARMA, INC. Millennium: The Takeda Oncology Company Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation (MMRF) Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc. Northwest Biotherapeutics, Inc. Novacea, Inc. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation (Novartis Oncology) Onyx Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Ortho Biotech Products, L.P. OSI Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Panacea Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Pfizer Inc. Pharmion Corporation (Pharmion International Ltd) Poniard Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Precision Therapeutics ProStraken, Inc. Purdue Pharma LP RIT Oncology LLC Roche Laboratories, Inc. sanofi-aventis U.S. NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 13
  14. 14. Schering-Plough Corporation Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Spectrum Pharmaceuticals Synta Pharmaceuticals Corp. The Binding Site Tibotec Therapeutics TopoTarget USA, Inc. Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Vion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Wyeth Pharmaceuticals YM BioScience Inc. Health Care and Medical Device Companies Accuray Incorporated Adherex Technologies Inc. Agendia BV Aptium Oncology Associates of Cape Cod, Inc. Bio-Reference Laboratories, Inc. BSD Medical Corporation CARIS DX Cell Therapeutics, Inc. (CTI) GE Healthcare Genomic Health, Inc. Genoptix Medical Laboratory Immunicon IMS Health Impac Software ImpediMed, Inc. InfuSystem Intuitive Surgical, Inc. Inverness Medical Innovations Inc. Johnson & Johnson Medtronic, Inc. Molecular MD Neomatrix RedPath Integrated Pathology Reed Medical Response Genetics Ross Products (a division of Abbott Laboratories) Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc. Thomson Medical Varian Medical Systems, Inc. Veridex, LLC Within3 Xanthus Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Zynx Health NCCN Corporate Council The NCCN Corporate Council is an important resource for the development and expansion of NCCN programs. NCCN gratefully acknowledges the support and commitment of the following companies to the improvement of the treatments available to the patients we serve. We also appreciate the recognition of NCCN’s necessary autonomy in all decision- making regarding the conclusions, recommendations, and outcomes of NCCN programs. Abbott Oncology Alexion Pharmaceuticals Allos Therapeutics, Inc. Amgen Antisoma Inc NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 14
  15. 15. ARIAD Pharmaceuticals AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Biogen idec Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Bristol-Myers Squibb Celgene Corporation Centocor Ortho Biotech Cephalon Oncology Dendreon Corporation Eisai Inc. GE Healthcare Genentech Genomic Health, Inc. Genzyme Corporation GlaxoSmithKline Lilly USA, LLC Merck Oncology Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Myriad Genetics, Inc Novartis Oncology Onyx Pharmaceuticals Pfizer Poniard Pharmaceuticals Precision Therapeutics Roche sanofi-aventis Spectrum Pharmaceuticals Section 8: NCCN Content NCCN Content The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN® ) is a not-for-profit alliance of twenty-one of the world’s leading cancer centers working together to improve the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care. In furtherance of such purposes, at significant time and expense, NCCN has developed proprietary content for the provision of cancer care, including without limitation, the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™), the NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium™), the NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates (NCCN Templates™), and additional documentation and patient information (collectively NCCN Content). © National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc 2010, All Rights Reserved. National Comprehensive Cancer Network® , NCCN® , NCCN Guidelines™, NCCN Compendium™, NCCN Templates™, GUS™, NCCN Flash Updates™, NCCN Trends™ Surveys & Data, and NCCN Oncology Insights Reports™ are trademarks owned by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. Upon receiving permission to use NCCN Content, NCCN will provide the requisite citation information. The following examples of citations are for internal use by NCCN only. NCCN Content may not be copied, transferred, reproduced, modified or otherwise used for any purpose without the express written authorization of NCCN. Citing the NCCN Guidelines NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 15
  16. 16. To cite NCCN Guidelines accessed from the website, reproduced with permission by NCCN, follow this example: The NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) Breast Cancer (Version 1.2010). © 2010 National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. Available at: NCCN.org. Accessed [Month and Day, Year]. To view the most recent and complete version of the NCCN Guidelines™ , go on-line to NCCN.org. Citing the NCCN Compendium To cite the NCCN Compendium accessed from the website, reproduced with permission by NCCN, follow this example: The NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium™) © 2010 National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. Available at: NCCN.org. Accessed [Month and Day, Year]. To view the most recent and complete version of the NCCN Compendium™ , go on-line to NCCN.org. Citing the NCCN Templates To cite the NCCN Templates accessed from the website, reproduced with permission by NCCN, follow this example: The NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates (NCCN Templates™) © 2010 National Comprehensive Cancer Network, Inc. Available at: NCCN.org. Accessed [Month and Day, Year]. To view the most recent and complete version of the NCCN Templates™ , go on-line to NCCN.org. Section 9: Punctuation Capitalization Only capitalize the formal title of the program. Therefore, do not capitalize words such as journal, database, network, organization, program, or symposium unless they are part of the official NCCN title. Exceptions: NCCN Member Institutions NCCN Guidelines™ NCCN Guidelines Panels NCCN Guidelines Panel Members Do not capitalize “disease,” “syndrome,” or “lymphomas”: Example: only “Hodgkin’s” should be capitalized in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas unless as part of a title. (e.g., Non- Hodgkin’s Lymphomas) The NCCN 15th Annual Conference should be capitalized because it can be considered a title of the conference. When written without ‘NCCN’ and ‘the preceding number’, “annual conference” should be lowercase. Capitalization questions are typically encountered when referencing an NCCN program for the second time in text. Examples of how to handle second references are listed below: First Reference Second Reference JNCCN this journal NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) NCCN Guidelines™ (Third reference: NCCN Guidelines) NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database NCCN Database National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN® ) NCCN or the organization NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium™) NCCN Compendium™ (Third reference: NCCN Compendium) Commas NCCN uses a serial comma (e.g., when a conjunction is used in a series, a comma should appear before it). Example: Doctors, researchers, and patients review the guidelines. NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 16
  17. 17. Designations Insert commas after final designation when used in a sentence. Examples: Al B. Benson III, MD Paul F. Engstrom, MD, FACP Kristina Gregory, RN, OCN, is the nurse planner Do not use periods in abbreviations for licenses, degrees, certifications, associations, and organizations. Examples: MD, RN MS, PhD NCCN, ASCO, ACS Hyphens, En dashes, and Em dashes Hyphens are used to connect words, prefixes, and suffixes permanently or temporarily. Example: merry-go-round (permanent), decision-making methods (permanent) methods of decision-making (temporary) long-term therapy (temporary) easy-to-use (permanent) allows for easy-use (temporary) (The following guidelines are from the AMA Style Guide. See the AMA Guide for more information on this and other grammar points.) Em dashes are used to indicate a sudden interruption or break in the thought of a sentence. These should be used sparingly, if at all. Please note: because of problems with translation, please DO NOT use em dashes or en dashes in ANY Corel documents or documents that will be converted for use on the Web. Example: All of these factors – age, severity of symptoms, psychic preparation, and choice of anesthetic agent – determine the patient’s reaction. En-dashes are longer than hyphens but half the length of the em dash. The en dash shows relational distinction in a hyphenated or compound modifier or when the word being modified is compound. It is also sometimes used in number ranges. Please note: because of problems with translation, please DO NOT use em dashes or en dashes in ANY Corel documents or documents that will be converted for use on the Web. Example: physician-lawyer–directed section, multiple sclerosis–like symptoms. Section 10: Style and Usage Address and telephone information National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN® ) 275 Commerce Drive • Suite 300 Fort Washington, PA 19034 215.690.0300 Fax: 215.690.0280 Do not use parentheses or 1- when including the area code of a phone number. The marketing department has implemented the use of periods to separate a phone number. Example: 215.690.0300 NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 17
  18. 18. Alphabetical List of Preferred Usage • AM (small caps, no periods) / PM (small caps, no periods) • CD-ROM, CD-ROMs • e-mail • health care (two words, no hyphen) – except in supporter names listed above • Internet • log on (two words, no hyphen) • nonprofit • non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas • on-line (two words joined by hyphen) • patients with cancer (not cancer patients) • payer (not payor) • preoperative / postoperative • stage is usually lower case (stage 1 carcinoma) • The term “quality-of-life” takes hyphens when used as an adjective (quality-of-life measurements) but not when used as a noun (we investigated quality of life); QOL can be included in parentheses after first mention and can be used thereafter. • Supported by (an) educational grant(s) from SUPPORTER LOGO(S) • The Westin Diplomat (not Resort & Spa) • time ranges: 4:00 – 5:00 PM (en dash; see above) • Washington DC • webcast • website • the web Dates Month and year When a period of time is identified by the month and year, no internal punctuation in needed. Example: The committee met in June 2000 to discuss the upcoming events. Geographical Designations United States should be spelled out if it appears as a noun. If used as an adjective, abbreviate United States as U.S. (with periods). Use the 2-letter postal designations for states when noting the location of NCCN Member Institutions, organizations, or companies. Spell out the state name when referring to a statewide law, program, or initiative OR when referring to a city, state where a regional is being held. Examples: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center in Los Angeles, CA A California state law prohibits... Advertising: Faces Ad: Los Angeles, California Regional Registration forms: Los Angeles, California Lists Numbered lists in text should include a numeral with an end parenthesis Example: The NCCN Guidelines™ for Central Nervous System Cancer focus on seven general histologic categories: 1) high-grade invasive astrocytomas, 2) low-grade invasive astrocytomas, 3) oligodendrogliomas, 4) ependymomas, 5) brain metastases, 6) carcinomatous meningitis, and 7) CNS lymphoma. Number Usage Numbers from 1-9 should be written out (e.g., nine), except as units of measure, including time. Numbers 10 and above are always used as numerals, except at the start of a sentence. Examples: The study included nine patients with …; but a 9-year-old boy…or patients received 9 mL … NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 18
  19. 19. We evaluated 314 cases of … Other Instances over vs. more than: Use “more than” when a number is involved. Use “over” to indicate motion or situation in a position higher than or above another. Examples: More than 700 people attended the conference. The bird flew over the lake. units of measure: Follow the AMA style guide for abbreviations of units of measure Press Releases Refer to AP Style Guide Referring to Age, Gender, and Ethnicity For your convenience, the style and usage information for age, sex, and gender from the AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for Authors and Editors, 9th ed. is provided below: Age Use the specific terminology below to refer to age. • Children are persons aged 1 to 12 years. Sometimes children may be used more broadly to encompass persons from birth to 12 years of age. They may also be referred to as boys or girls. • Adolescents are persons aged 13 through 17 years. They may also be referred to as teenagers or as adolescent boys or adolescent girls, depending on the context. • Adults are persons 18 years and older and should be referred to as men or women. Sex/Gender Sex refers to the biological characteristics of males and females. Gender includes more than sex and serves as a cultural indicator of a person’s personal and social status. An important consideration when referring to sex is the level of specificity required: specify sex when it is relevant. Choose sex-neutral terms that avoid bias, suit the material under discission, and do not intrude on the reader’s attention. Please note: male and female are adjectives, not nouns. Please use man/woman if ages are known or male subjects or patients/female subjects or patients if man/woman is not appropriate. Avoid Preferred man, mankind people, human beings, humans, humanity, humankind, human species chairwoman, chairman chair, chairperson spokesman, spokeswoman spokesperson maiden name birth name Note: Use man or men when referring to a man or a group of men, woman or women when referring to a woman or a group of women. Similarly, chairman or spokesman might be used if the person under discussion is a man, and chairwoman or spokeswoman if she is a woman. Any of these might be used if it is an official title. Avoid sex-specific pronouns in cases in which sex specificity is irrelevant. Avoid Preferred The physician and his office staff can do Physicians and their office staff can do much to alleviate a patient's nervousness. much to alleviate a patient's nervousness. Everyone must allocate their time One must allocate one's time effectively. effectively. Time must be allocated effectively. Race/Ethnicity Please refer to the AMA Manual of Style: A Guide for authors and editors, 9th ed. for specific information regarding race and ethnicity. NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 19
  20. 20. Section 11: NCCN Fact Sheet and Messaging NCCN Boilerplate The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN® ), a not-for-profit alliance of 21 of the world’s leading cancer centers, is dedicated to improving the quality and effectiveness of care provided to patients with cancer. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The primary goal of all NCCN initiatives is to improve the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of oncology practice so patients can live better lives. NCCN Mission The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN® ) is dedicated to improving care along the continuum of cancer screening, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. An alliance of 21 of the world’s leading cancer centers, NCCN communicates sound, evaluative clinical information to enhance the decision-making processes of patients, physicians, and others who influence access to and the choice of cancer care. NCCN Programs and Resources NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) The NCCN Guidelines™ - the recognized standard for clinical policy in oncology - are the most comprehensive and most frequently updated clinical practice guidelines available in any area of medicine. Covering 97 percent of all patients with cancer and updated on a continual basis, the NCCN Guidelines are developed through an explicit review of the evidence integrated with expert medical judgment and recommendations by multidisciplinary panels from NCCN Member Institutions. There are 44 individual panels, comprising nearly 900 clinicians and oncology researchers from the 21 NCCN Member Institutions and their affiliates. Specific treatment recommendations are implemented through performance measurement. NCCN Guidelines Panels address cancer detection, prevention and risk reduction, workup and diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care. NCCN Guidelines have become the most widely used guidelines in oncology practice and have been requested by cancer care professionals in more than 115 countries. There has also been substantial international interest in translating the NCCN Guidelines into a variety of languages. Select NCCN Guidelines have been translated into Chinese, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish, and Turkish. NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium™) Based directly on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™), the NCCN Compendium™ contains authoritative, scientifically derived information designed to support decision-making about the appropriate use of drugs and biologics in patients with cancer. The NCCN Compendium is now recognized by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and UnitedHealthcare, along with other insurers, as an authoritative reference for oncology coverage policy. Managed care medical directors, pharmacy benefits directors, and other health care professionals also reference the NCCN Compendium when making decisions that impact patient access to appropriate therapy. The uses identified are based upon evaluation of evidence from scientific literature integrated with expert judgment in an evidence- based process. Indicated uses are categorized in a systematic approach that describes the type of evidence available for and the degree of consensus underlying each recommendation. All recommendations (at all category levels) in the NCCN Compendium constitute appropriate, medically-necessary care. The NCCN Compendium lists both FDA-approved uses and appropriate uses beyond the FDA-approved label. NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates (NCCN Templates™) NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 20
  21. 21. NCCN is developing a library of chemotherapy order templates to improve the safe and effective use of drugs and biologics in cancer care. The information contained in the NCCN Templates™ is based on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) and the NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium™. The NCCN Templates include chemotherapy, immunotherapy, supportive care agents, monitoring parameters, and safety instructions. Special instructions for self-administered chemotherapeutic agents are also provided. NCCN Templates enhance patient safety by allowing health care providers to standardize patient care, reduce medication errors, and anticipate and manage adverse events. National, Regional, and International Educational Conferences and Symposia NCCN Annual Conference: Clinical Practice Guidelines & Quality Cancer Care™ The NCCN Annual Conference: Clinical Practice Guidelines & Quality Cancer Care™ attracts more than 1,700 registrants from across the United States and the globe including oncologists (in both community and academic settings), oncology fellows, nurses, pharmacists, and other health care professionals involved in the care of patients with cancer. Respected opinion leaders present the latest cancer therapies and provide updates on selected NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™), the data upon which the NCCN Guidelines™ are based, and quality initiatives in oncology. Topics change annually but focus on the major cancers and supportive care areas. The NCCN Annual Conference also includes case study discussion forums with experts from NCCN Member Institutions and roundtable discussions featuring the foremost professionals from the academic, patient advocacy, government, payor, industry, and business realms of cancer care. NCCN Annual Congress: Hematologic Malignancies™ Treatment of hematologic malignancies is increasingly complex. Issues relating to pathology, transplantation, and various new therapies require oncologists and hematologists to stay abreast of breakthrough advances. In addition, targeted therapies and oral treatments bring the latest benefits to patients. This program focuses on new approaches that have been incorporated into patient management, including the use of drugs, biologics, and diagnostics. At the 2009 NCCN Congress, agenda topics included the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) for Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Multiple Myeloma, and Non- Hodgkin’s Lymphomas, as well as Supportive Care for Patients with Hematologic Malignancies. NCCN Congress Series The NCCN Congress Series provides a comprehensive analysis of the evidence and clinical decision-making that result in the development of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology™ (NCCN Guidelines™). Content is offered both through on-site meetings and in webinar format. The programs are free to physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and other health care related professionals and offers continuing education credits for physicians (CME) and nurses (CE). NCCN Guidelines Update Webinar Series™ The NCCN Guidelines Update Webinar Series™ is designed to quickly communicate significant updates to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™). These live webinars consist of a presentation by an NCCN Guidelines™ Panel Member, as well as an interactive question and answer period for participants. During the webinars there is discussion of the issues considered by the NCCN Guidelines Panels that resulted in changes to the NCCN Guidelines, new data is compared with existing standards of care, and significant studies that supported modification of the NCCN Guidelines Panels recommendations are reviewed. NCCN Academy for Excellence & Leadership in Oncology™ School of Pharmaceutical & Biotech Business Through this interactive program, pharmaceutical and biotech professionals will learn from key stakeholders what they view to be the most pressing issues in oncology today and how to apply this knowledge to create mutually-successful working relationships. Further, they will hear thought leaders discuss how their decisions and programs are shaped by certain types of information and data. NCCN Academy features modules that focus on real-world trends including policy, coverage, reimbursement, informational, and operational issues in oncology presented by dynamic experts in the field. Experienced professionals from marketing, sales, medical affairs, clinical research, policy and government affairs, and other business areas within the pharmaceutical and biotech industries gather valuable insights to developing effective NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 21
  22. 22. strategies for navigating the various constituencies in cancer care and are better able to serve their customers upon completion of this program. NCCN Oncology Research Best Practices Conference™ The NCCN Oncology Research Best Practices Conference is a two-day conference focused on educating participants in the regulatory aspects of research and identifying areas in the clinical trial process where improvements can be made. This conference is designed to be interactive through the use of panel discussions and smaller breakout sessions. Ample opportunities exist for attendees to network with peers and to get important questions and concerns addressed throughout the two-day session. Program attendees are able to: identify best practices for improving the operational processes related to conducting oncology research including contracting, budgeting, resource allocation, adverse event reporting, benchmarking, and data management and monitoring; identify best practices for maintaining and improving regulatory compliance in oncology research on federal, state, and local levels; and discuss tools and resources to improve oncology research processes. NCCN Patient Safety Summit The NCCN Patient Safety Summit creates a forum for administrators from NCCN Member Institutions to share experiences and discuss best practices in oncology patient safety, a topic that has long been recognized as an integral component of high-quality medical care. In the past decade, the spotlight on safety in medicine has only become brighter. The stakes are especially high in oncology, and avoiding error is imperative in delivering chemotherapy and other high- risk treatments. NCCN International Programs NCCN develops additional and expanded symposia to international audiences of medical professionals in oncology. NCCN has presented the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) and supporting data at interactive educational programs in Beijing, Shanghai, and Guangzhou, China; Tokyo and Yokohama, Japan; Seoul, South Korea; and Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Additionally, regional experts present information about their patient populations and respective management approaches to the disease states. On the global stage, NCCN addresses areas such as screening, staging, and therapeutic strategies for tumor types as well as supportive care options. Multidisciplinary management approaches to certain oncologic diseases are discussed by medical oncologists, surgical oncologists, and radiation oncologists from world-recognized NCCN Member Institutions and leading foreign cancer centers. NCCN regularly collaborates with international organizations to create and distribute translations of the NCCN Guidelines, which may include modifications representative of metabolic differences in populations, technological considerations, and regulatory status of agents used in cancer management, such as availabilities of drugs, biologics, devices, and procedures. JNCCN – The Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network More than 22,000 oncologists and other cancer care professionals across the United States read JNCCN – The Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. This peer-reviewed, indexed medical journal, edited by Harold J. Burstein, MD, PhD, provides the latest information about best clinical practices, oncology outcomes, and new research initiatives. JNCCN features updates on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™), timely reviews and commentaries elaborating on guideline recommendations and expanding on important themes and emerging practices, and health services and clinical research papers. JNCCN’s goal is to improve the quality of cancer care by addressing oncology practice for all disease stages and presentations. Content covers the entire spectrum of oncologic health care, from prevention and screening to treatment and supportive care. JNCCN is dedicated to improving the quality of cancer care locally, nationally, and internationally while enhancing the collaboration between academic medicine and the community physician. JNCCN is further committed to sharing outstanding clinical practices and insights by contributing to the creation of excellence in cancer care for more people and reporting rigorous outcomes data collected and analyzed by the experts from the world’s leading care centers. NCCN Oncology Research Program (ORP) The NCCN Oncology Research Program (ORP) is organized to obtain funding to support scientifically meritorious research projects at the NCCN Member Institutions. Policies and standards for the program were set by the NCCN NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 22
  23. 23. Investigator Steering Committee, a group comprised of senior research physicians appointed by each NCCN Member Institution. The NCCN ORP has received $21.9 million in research grants from major pharmaceutical companies to support investigator-initiated trials. These trials explore new venues of clinical investigation that answer important scientific questions. Studies evaluate innovative combinations and sequencing regimens of drugs, drug resistance, mechanisms of action of specific agents, or explore extended uses for specific agents. NCCN has received the following grants to support investigator-initiated trials: • Abraxis BioScience, Inc. and AstraZeneca – • $2,075,000 for clinical studies of paclitaxel, albumin-bound • Allos Therapeutics, Inc. - $2,300,000 for clinical studies of pralatrexate • Bristol-Myers Squibb Company and ImClone Systems Incorporated – $3,355,232 for clinical studies of cetuximab in head and neck cancers and bladder cancers • Cephalon, Inc. – $1,391,193 for clinical studies of bendamustine • Merck & Co., Inc. – $1,046,380 for clinical studies of vorinostat • Pfizer, Inc. – $3,150,000 for clinical studies of irinotecan and celecoxib • Pfizer, Inc. – $2,000,000 for preclinical and specialized imaging studies of sunitinib • Roche Laboratories, Inc. – $2,500,000 for clinical studies of capecitabine • Wyeth – $4,150,000 for clinical studies of temsirolimus NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database The NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database is a network-based data collection, reporting, and analytic system that contains expansive data on drug/biologic and diagnostics utilization and trends; specific indications and sequencing; toxicity and reasons for discontinuation; complications and medical events; progression free and overall survival; comparative effectiveness and resource consumption; and payer-specific data. The concept for the NCCN Database was established in 1996, and the operation of the first database in breast cancer followed in July of 1997. With the NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database, NCCN seeks to implement the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) through performance measurement. The objectives for data collection and reporting are to: • Describe the patterns of care within NCCN Member Institutions • Measure concordance of practice in NCCN Member Institutions with NCCN Guidelines™ recommendations • Evaluate the outcomes of such practice patterns • Deliver benchmarked data to participating NCCN Member Institutions, practicing physicians, and NCCN Guidelines Panels to facilitate the continuous improvement of the quality of cancer care • Identify the most efficient and cost-effective strategies for the management of common oncologic conditions • Offer benchmarking capabilities to NCCN Member Institutions that compare network data, institutional data, and, eventually, community data • Create a major research resource and repository of data for clinical and health service researchers to access and derive hypothesis generated analyses Presently, the NCCN Oncology Outcomes Database has five active database components: breast, colon/rectal, non- Hodgkin’s lymphomas, non-small cell lung, and ovarian. NCCN Resource Tool: Risk Evaluation & Mitigation Strategies (REMS) for Clinicians In response to recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) actions, NCCN has dedicated pages on both NCCN.org and NCCN.com to serve as reference tools for clinicians and patients seeking more information about drugs and biologics requiring Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS). REMS are strategies intended to assess adverse risks associated with particular drugs and biologics. These types of analyses, which traditionally fell under the jurisdiction of private sponsors and companies, are now coming to drug manufacturers in the form of FDA mandates. The current REMS clinician page at NCCN.org lists agents used in oncology care that have an FDA-approved REMS, including those for active treatment and those used for supportive care. NCCN Member Institution Profiles™ A reference guide for cancer case managers NCCN Member Institution Profiles™ is an informational resource for case managers that is designed to facilitate appropriate decision making about the management and referral of all cancer cases, including those that involve complex, NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 23
  24. 24. aggressive, or uncommon cancers. The NCCN Member Institution Profiles™ references the areas of expertise, pediatric oncology specialties, and programs in genetic testing and counseling at each NCCN Member Institution. Additional information includes a glossary of terms derived from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) and the National Cancer Institute. NCCN Member Institution Profiles™ also provides information on how to schedule an appointment at each NCCN Member Institution and how to receive information about current clinical trials. Managed Care Collaborations NCCN collaborates with managed care organizations and insurance companies to facilitate patient access to NCCN Member Institutions and to improve the quality and outcome of care delivered to patients with cancer. NCCN works with payors to ensure that patients have access to the expert and specialized services available at these leading cancer centers. NCCN aims to facilitate this process so that patients and health professionals can benefit from NCCN Member Institutions’ commitment to providing the highest quality cancer care. NCCN has active initiatives in place with UnitedHealthcare, OptumHealth, BlueCross BlueShield Association, and Humana. NCCN collaborates with these organizations on programs related to quality, coverage, reimbursement, and outcomes in cancer care. NCCN Oncology Case Management Program™ NCCN offers oncology case management education programs designed to meet the needs of case managers and medical directors in managed care organizations. The program highlights the comprehensive cancer care delivered by NCCN Member Institutions. Program participants are educated on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) and the NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium™). Other topics covered include, an overview of oncology care today with an emphasis on complex cancers, communicating with patients with cancer and addressing end-of-life issues, emerging pharmaceutical and technology issues in cancer care, and understanding clinical trials. Content is offered at on-site meetings and via webinar. NCCN offers continuing education credits for nurses (CEU), case managers (CCM), and physicians (CME). NCCN also provides overviews of the “big four” cancers: breast, lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers. These 90-minute presentations are offered as webinars. NCCN Insights™: Analytics, Research & Consulting Through several new tools and services, NCCN provides insight, research, and analysis on oncology practice patterns and key issues in the cancer environment, as well as immediate notification of NCCN information product updates at the time of publication. NCCN Trends™ Surveys & Data NCCN Trends™ is a new survey-based data and analytics tool from NCCN that researches how clinicians in the United States and abroad deliver cancer care. NCCN Trends™ Surveys research questions about patterns of care and preferences for use of diagnostics, drugs and biologics, and other cancer treatment modalities. Data is gathered by sending brief electronic surveys to the thousands of clinicians who use the NCCN website to access information. These clinicians include practicing physicians in diverse practice settings, such as academic/research cancer centers, community hospitals, and private practices. NCCN Trends™ Surveys and Data are independent of any NCCN clinical recommendations or guidelines. Participants in the surveys receive a summary of survey results that offer insight into their own practice. NCCN Oncology Insights Reports™ NCCN Oncology Insights Reports™ bring expertise and depth of knowledge in cancer care to audiences who need to access timely and relevant insight on oncology policy, economics, and market changes. These reports bring together clinical knowledge, policy and economic analysis, qualitative research, and quantitative data with the goal of providing comprehensive and up-to-date information on current factors, emerging trends, and future directions influencing the oncology environment. NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 24
  25. 25. NCCN Flash Updates™ NCCN Flash Updates™ is a new service from NCCN that provides timely access to updated and new information that appears in the published NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™) and NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium™). These update notifications are delivered straight to subscribers’ inboxes. NCCN eBulletin Newsletter NCCN eBulletin is an electronic newsletter delivered every other Monday to all registered users of NCCN.org. NCCN eBulletin features articles on topics including clinical and operational trends in the delivery of cancer care and the oncology health policy environment, notification of recent updates to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™), and links to notable advances in treatment and research at the NCCN Member Institutions. NCCN.org NCCN.org is a valuable resource for clinical professionals and other health care decision-makers who rely on the website for access to the latest updates to the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™), the NCCN Drugs & Biologics Compendium (NCCN Compendium™), and the NCCN Chemotherapy Order Templates (NCCN Templates™). Clinical professionals can also register for educational events and resources; complete online continuing education programs; learn about the most recent developments at NCCN; and order NCCN resources including pocket- sized versions of NCCN Guidelines™, the Complete Library of NCCN Guidelines on CD-ROM, and accredited materials such as archived presentations on CD-ROM. Comprehensive information about NCCN Member Institutions is available along with links to the websites of each NCCN Member Institution. Links are also provided to connect clinical professionals and other health care decision-makers to NCCN.com – a website devoted to patients, caregivers, and their families. NCCN.com NCCN.com is a website devoted to patients, caregivers, and their families, developed by NCCN. It is the only patient- oriented cancer website based on the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines™), which set the standard of care for clinicians around the globe. The goal of NCCN.com is to educate people about cancer so they can have more informed conversations with their doctors and other health care providers and ultimately live longer and better quality lives. NCCN.com features the NCCN Guidelines for Patients™, translations of the NCCN Guidelines™, and also includes information on all facets of cancer, from prevention and screening through life after cancer. NCCN, the world’s leading authority for cancer information for clinicians, is now just a click away for patients and caregivers. This website helps patients, survivors, families, and friends to: o Utilize the NCCN Guidelines for Patients™, consumer-friendly translations of the NCCN Guidelines which physicians use around the globe when making treatment decisions o Use the NCCN Treatment Summaries for People with Cancer™ - less complex overviews of specific cancers for both early and late-stage disease based on the NCCN Guidelines o Locate financial, prescription, and other kinds of assistance for cancer care o Understand insurance and find the best types of insurance plans o Manage fatigue and other symptoms of cancer and cancer treatment o Understand basic information about cancer o Promote their own health, including a healthful diet o Learn how to talk to people, including their doctors, about their cancer o Live well with, and after, cancer NCCN Written Identity Guidelines Updated: January 30, 2015 Page 25

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