Aspects of health care

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Aspects of health care

  1. 1. Table S1 1. Ackerman-Ross FS, Sochat N. Close encounters of the medical kind: attitudes toward male and female physicians. Social Science and Medicine, 1980; 14: 61-64. 2. Adib SM, Hamadeh GN. Attitudes of the Lebanese public regarding disclosure of serious illness. Journal of Medical Ethics, 1999; 25: 399-403. 3. Al-Bashir MM, Armstrong D. Preferences of healthy and ill patients for style of general practitioner care: implications for workload and financial incentives under the new contract. British Journal of General Practice 1991; 41: 6-8. 4. Allen D, Leavey R, Marks B. Survey of patients' satisfaction with access to general practitioners. Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners 1988; 38: 163-165. 5. Anvik T. Doctors in a white coat - what do patients think and what do doctors do? Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care 1990; 8: 91-94. 6. Audrain J, Rimer B, Cella D, Garber J, Peshkin BN, Ellis J, Schildkraut J, Stefanek M, Vogel V, Lerman C. Genetic counseling and testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility: what do women want? Journal of Clinical Oncology, 1998; 16: 133-8. 7. Ayanian JZ, Cleary PD, Weissman JS, Epstein AM. The effect of patients’ preferences on racial differences in access to renal transplantation. New England Journal of Medicine, 1999: 341: 1661-1669. 8. Bartholomew L, Schneiderman LJ. Attitudes of patients towards family care in a family practice group. Journal of Family Practice 1982; 15: 477-481. 9. Beaver K, Luker KA, Owens RG, Leinster SJ, Degner LF, Sloan JAl. Treatment decision making in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. Cancer Nursing 1996;19:8-19. 10. Beisecker AE. Aging and the desire for information and input in medical decisions: patient consumerism in medical encounters. The Gerontologist, 1980; 28: 330-35. 11. Benkendorf JL, Reutenauer JE, Hughes CA, Eads N, Willinson J, Powers M, Lerman C. Patients’ attitudes about autonomy and confidentiality in genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility. American Journal of Medical Genetics, 1997; 73: 296-303. 12. Bennet CC, Richards DS. Patient acceptance of endovaginal ultrasound. Ultrasound on Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2000; 15: 52-5. 13. Bilodeau BA, Degner LF. Information needs in women with breast cancer. Oncol Nursing Forum, 1996; 23: 691-696. 14. Bishop F, Matthews FJ, Probert CSJ, et al. Patients’ views on how to run hospital outpatient clinics. Journal of the Royal Society and Medicine 1991; 84: 522-3. 15. Blackhall LJ, Murphy ST, Frank G, et al. Ethnicity and attitudes toward patient autonomy. JAMA, 1995; 274: 820-825. 16. Boekeloo BO, Schamus LA, Cheng TL, et al. Young adolescents’ comfort with discussion about sexual problems with their physician. Arch Pediatr Adoloesc Med 1996; 150:1146-1152. 17. Botelho RJ, Lue BH, Fiscella K. Family involvement in routine health care: a survey of patients’ behaviors and preferences. Journal of Family Practice, 1996; 42: 572-576. 18. Buckley LM, Vacek P, Cooper SM. Educational and psychological needs of patients with chronic disease. A survey of preferences of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis Care and Research 1990; 3: 5-10. 19. Cartwright N, Johnson C, Jones S. Patients' preferences for appointment times. British Medical Journal 1990; 300: 848. 20. Casparie AF, Van der Waal MA. Differences in preferences between diabetic patients and diabetologists regarding quality of care: a matter of continuity and efficiency of care? Diabetic Medicine, 1995; 12: 828- 32. 21. Cassileth BR, Zupkis RV, Sutton-Smith K, March V. Information and participation preferences among cancer patients. Annals of Internal Medicine, 1980; 92: 832-836 22. Catalan J, Brener N, Andrews H, et al. Whose health is it? Views about decision-making and information- seeking from people with HIV infection and their professional carers. AIDS-Care:1994;6, 3, 349-356. 23. Ciampi A, Silberfeld M, Till JE. Measurement of individual preferences. The importance of ‘situation-specific’ variables. Med Decis Making 1982;2:483-495. 24. Coley CM, Li YH, Medsger AR, et al. Preferences for home vs hospital care among low-risk patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Archives of Internal Medicine, 1996;156:1565-71. 25. Coulter A, Peto V, Doll. H. Patients' preferences and general practitioners' decisions in the treatment of menstrual disorders. Family Practice, 1994; 11: 67-74. 26. Crawford BM, Meana M, Stewart D, Cheung AM. Treatment decision making in mature adults: gender differences. Health Care for Women International, 2000; 21: 91-104. 27. Croyle RT, Lerman C. Interest in genetic testing for colon cancer susceptibility: cognitive and emotional correlates. Preventive Medicine 1993;22:284-292 28. Dalla-Vorgia P, Katsouyanni K, Garanis TN, et al. Attitudes of a Mediterranean population to the truth-telling issue. Journal of Medical Ethics, 1992; 18: 67-74. 29. Davison BJ, Degner LF, Morgan TR. Information and decision-making preferences of men with prostate cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum, 1995; 22:1401-1408. 30. Deber RB, Kraetschmer N, Irvine J. What role do patients wish to play in treatment decision making? Archives of Internal Medicine, 1996; 156: 1414-1420.
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Journal of Surgical Oncology, 1996; 63: 183-6. 68. Jones R. Patients’ attitudes to chaperones. Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners 1985;35:192- 193. 69. Jung HP, Wensing M, Grol R. What is important to patients? Aspects of general practice care, seen from the patient’s perspective. [Wat vinden patienten belangrijk? Aspecten van de huisartsenzorg, gezien vanuit het perspectief van de patiënt. Huisarts Wet 1996; 39:594-9. 70. Kapphahn CJ, Wilson KM, Klein JD. Adolescent girls’ and boys’ preferences for provider gender and confidentiality in their health care. The Journal of Adolescent Health,1999; 25: 131-42. 71. Kennedy ED, Detsky AS, Llewellyn-Thomas HA, et al. Can the standard gamble be used to determine utilities for uncertain health states? An example using post-operative maintenance in Crohn’s disease. Medical Decision Making, 2000; 20: 72-8. 72. Kerssens JJ, Benzing JM, Andela MG. Patient preference for genders of health professionals. Social Science and Medicine, 1997: 44: 1531-1540. 73. Kim MS, Smith DH, Yueguo G. Medical decision making and Chinese patients' self-construals. Health Communication, 1999; 11: 249-260. 74. Kiraly DA, Coulton CJ, Graham A. How family practice patients view their utilization of mental health services. Journal of Family Practice, 1982; 15: 317-23. 75. Kuppermann M, Nease RF, Learman LA, et al. Procedure-related miscarriages and Down syndrome-affected births: implications for prenatal testing based on women's preferences. Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 2000; 96: 511-6. 76. Kushner K, Meyer D, Hansen M, Bobula J, Hansen J, Pridham K. The family conference: what do patients want? Journal of Family Practice 1986; 23: 463-467. 77. Lawson RJ. Patients' attitudes to doctors. Journal of the Royal College of General Practitioners 1980; 30: 137- 138. 78. Lerman C, Daly M, Masny A, Balshem A. Attitudes about genetic testing for breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 1994; 12: 843-850. 79. Lerman C, Marshall, Audrain J, Gomez-Caminero A. Genetic testing for colon cancer susceptibility: anticipated reactions of patients and challenges to providers. Int J. Cancer 1996; 69:58-61. 80. Llewellyn-Thomas HA, MgGreal MJ, Thiel EC. Cancer patients’ decision making and trial-entry preferences: the effect of “framing’ information about short-term toxicity and long-term survival. Medical Decision Making, 1995; 15: 4-12. 81. Llewellyn-Thomas HA. In the queue for total hip replacement: patients’ perspectives on waiting times. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 1998;4:63-74. 82. Liu G, Franssen E, Fitch MI, Warner E. Patient preferences for oral versus intravenous palliative chemotherapy. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 1997; 15: 110-5. 83. Malus M, LaChance PA, Lamy L, et al. Priorities in adolescent health care: the teenager’s viewpoint. Journal of Family Practice 1987; 25: 159-162. 84. Markel DS, Young AB, Penney JB. At-risk persons’ attitudes toward presymptomatic and prenatal testing of Huntington Disease in Michigan. American Journal of Medical Genetics 1987; 26: 295-305. 85. Mastromauro C, Myers RH, Berkman B. Attitudes toward presymptomatic testing in Huntington disease. American Journal of Medical Genetics 1987; 26: 271-282. 86. Mazur DJ, Merz JF. Older patients’ willingness to trade off urologic adverse outcomes for a better chance at five-year survival in the clinical setting of prostate cancer. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 1995; 43: 979-984. 87. Mazur DJ, Merz JF, How older patients’ treatment preferences are influenced by disclosures about therapeutic uncertainty: surgery versus expectant management for localized prostate cancer. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 1996; 44: 934-7. 88. McAlister FA, O’Connor AM, Wells G, Grover SA, Laupacis A. When should hypertension be treated? The different perspectives of family physicians and patients. 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  4. 4. 92. Meissen GJ, Berchek RL. Intended use of predictive testing by those at risk for Huntington disease. American Journal of Medical Genetics 1987; 26: 283-293. 93. Meredith C, Symonds P, Webster, et al. Information needs of cancer patients in west Scotland: cross sectional survey of patients’ views. BMJ, 1996; 313; 724-726. 94. Meredith K, Delaney J, Horgan M, Fisher E Jr, Fraser V. A survey of women with HIV about their expectations for care. AIDS-care, 1997; 9: 513-22. 95. Miller MR, Forrest CB, Kan JS. Parental preferences for primary and specialty care collaboration in the management of teenagers with congenital heart disease. Pediatrics, 2000; 106: 264-9. 96. Mold JW, Looney SW, Viviani NJ, Quiggins PA. Predicting the health-related values and preferences of geriatric patients. Journal of Family Practice 1994; 39: 461-467. 97. Moore S, Gridley H, Taylor K, Johnson K. 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  6. 6. Table S2 Patient characteristic* Aspects of health care 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total Availability Flexibility 31 21 12 19 42 17 6 2 2 152 (6) Accessibility Waiting times Telephone consultations Physical accessibility Financial accessibility 12 2 6 5 10 2 6 4 6 1 4 2 6 1 3 4 16 1 4 5 7 2 7 3 3 2 1 60 (3) 9 (0) 32 (1) 24 (1) Organisation and cooperation Efficiency Premises Continuity Cooperation Preventive services 2 5 16 8 44 2 5 15 8 34 2 1 4 5 37 2 1 4 2 22 3 4 7 8 49 2 9 10 21 1 25 12 9 11 (0) 18 (1) 56 (2) 41 (2) 253 (11) Medical Care Effectiveness Competence/accuracy Burden on the patient 9 25 30 11 24 11 5 14 19 4 14 5 21 22 60 4 22 10 3 3 17 3 2 3 1 11 60 (3) 127 (6) 166 (7) Doctor-patient relation Humaneness Exploring patients’ needs Patients’ privacy Time for patient care Other doctor-patient relation Age and sex of doctor Patients’ involvement in decisions 13 2 17 5 11 26 46 12 2 14 5 10 24 26 6 1 6 4 2 8 33 4 2 2 2 8 21 13 2 17 7 5 16 49 9 2 8 3 6 7 23 1 3 2 9 11 1 8 2 5 14 3 59 (2) 9 (0) 75 (3) 26 (1) 40 (2) 103 (5) 226 (10) Informativeness 104 72 76 27 179 15 34 13 8 528 (23) Counselling and support Counselling Stimulating self-help Supporting patients’ relatives Other counselling and support 20 2 1 19 18 1 1 3 10 2 1 35 2 1 3 29 1 20 3 2 2 16 2 2 4 1 88 (4) 8 (0) 9 (0) 96 (4) Total 461 (20) 341 (15) 296 (13) 159 (7) 580 (25) 210 (9) 125 (5) 70 (3) 34 (1) 2276 * Patient characteristics: 1 = age; 2 = sex; 3 = education; 4 = economic status; 5 = health status; 6 = utilisation of health care; 7 = family situation; 8 = ethnicity; 9 = religion.
  7. 7. Table S3 Total number of items on aspects of care in study Total number of different patient characteristics in study * Total number of relations analysed in study (%)) Ackerman Adib Al-Bashir Allen Anvik Audrain Ayanian Bartholomew Beaver Beisecker Benkendorf Bennet Bilodeau Bishop Blackhall Boekeloo Botelho Buckley Cartwright Casparie Cassileth Catalan Ciampi Coley Coulter Crawford Croyle Dalla-Vorgia Davison Deber Degner ‘92 Degner ‘97 Derdiarian Detmar Dominitz Dowsett Drury Eisemann Elstad Ende Ewart Fennema Ferguson Finlayson Fletcher Fry Genuis Gibb Gilbar Glanz Glasser Gonzalez Graffy Gross Haar Hack 8 1 20 1 1 8 1 13 1 9 3 1 3 3 3 1 1 16 2 9 3 2 1 1 1 3 1 3 10 3 2 10 16 12 3 1 1 3 4 2 2 10 1 1 8 1 9 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 7 3 3 3 3 3 2 5 1 8 11 2 1 11 2 6 4 2 6 6 1 2 10 11 2 7 9 5 2 3 10 8 4 4 2 1 2 6 10 2 5 1 6 5 5 4 5 7 12 7 5 1 8 6 3 16 (1) 7 (0) 60 (3) 3 (0) 3 (0) 24 (1) 3 (0) 13 (1) 5 (0) 9 (0) 24 (1) 11 (0) 4 (0) 3 (0) 30 (1) 2 (0) 6 (0) 64 (3) 2 (0) 54 (2) 18 (1) 2 (0) 2 (0) 10 (0) 11 (0) 6 (0) 7 (0) 25 (1) 50 (2) 3 (0) 6 (0) 55 (2) 128 (6) 48 (2) 12 (1) 2 (0) 1 (0) 3 (0) 22 (1) 17 (1) 2 (0) 17 (1) 1 (0) 6 (0) 40 (2) 5 (0) 36 (2) 5 (0) 7 (0) 12 (1) 7 (0) 5 (0) 1 (0) 8 (0) 6 (0) 3 (0)
  8. 8. Total number of items on aspects of care in study Total number of different patient characteristics in study * Total number of relations analysed in study (%)) Hagmans Harrison Haug Heaton Himmel Hopton Hughes Hunter Jacobsen JA Jacobsen PB Johnson Jones Jung Kapphahn Kennedy Kerssens Kim Kiraly Kuppermann Kushner Lawson Lerman ‘94 Lerman ‘96 Liu Llewelyn-Thomas ‘95 Llewelyn-Thomas ‘98 Malus Markel Mastromauro Mazur ‘95 Mazur ‘96 McAlister McAvoy McBride McKinstry Meissen Meredith C Meredith K Miller Mold Moore Murphy Nease Nichols O’Hair Palda Patton Pendleton Penn Phillips Poma Poole** Poole** Price Radius Roberts Romm Ruzicki 6 2 1 3 3 28 2 1 2 1 1 2 40 5 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 7 1 2 8 5 8 5 4 8 4 2 1 2 4 2 7 4 5 1 1 20 1 1 4 1 3 1 4 1 5 1 9 5 8 5 1 3 6 28 7 5 2 7 2 9 1 6 6 4 4 7 2 10 12 1 10 1 1 3 3 1 4 5 3 4 2 2 8 2 1 10 6 3 2 2 1 2 1 4 2 5 6 6 18 (1) 2 (0) 4 (0) 3 (0) 15 (1) 28 (1) 18 (1) 5 (0) 16 (1) 5 (0) 1 (0) 6 (0) 240 (11) 67 (3) 7 (0) 10 (0) 2 (0) 7 (0) 2 (0) 9 (0) 1 (0) 6 (0) 6 (0) 7 (0) 4 (0) 7 (0) 4 (0) 30 (1) 24 (1) 1 (0) 10 (0) 1 (0) 1 (0) 21 (1) 3 (0) 2 (0) 32 (1) 8 (0) 24 (1) 12 (1) 8 (0) 16 (1) 32 (1) 2 (0) 1 (0) 20 (1) 19 (1) 6 (0) 10 (0) 5 (0) 5 (0) 2 (0) 1 (0) 80 (4) 2 (0) 5 (0) 10 (0) 6 (0)
  9. 9. Total number of items on aspects of care in study Total number of different patient characteristics in study * Total number of relations analysed in study (%)) Ryan Saha Shank Shannon Simons Sims Singer Smith CH Smith DH Smith KR Starr Stewart Struewing Strull Tabenkin Tambor Teltscher Thompson Van der Voort Van der Waal Van Ness Vertinsky Vick Weyrauch Wolf Wolinsky Woodward Yaffe Yellen ‘94 Yellen ‘95 Zemencuk 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 20 1 1 16 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 10 9 1 5 6 1 1 1 2 1 2 4 3 2 5 1 3 4 7 8 2 3 7 4 3 2 6 4 5 5 5 3 5 3 13 5 2 7 22 3 6 7 2 7 3 (0) 15 (1) 2 (0) 3 (0) 4 (0) 7 (0) 8 (0) 40 (2) 3 (0) 7 (0) 64 (3) 4 (0) 2 (0) 9 (0) 4 (0) 5 (0) 5 (0) 5 (0) 30 (1) 45 (2) 3 (0) 61 (3) 30 (1) 2 (0) 7 (0) 22 (1) 6 (0) 6 (0) 14 (1) 8 (0) 21 (1) Total Mean Maximum Minimum Median 562 3.9 40 1 2 698 4.8 28 1 4 2276 (100) 15.7 240 1 7 * Falling within the inclusion criteria for the present literature analysis.
  10. 10. Total number of items on aspects of care in study Total number of different patient characteristics in study * Total number of relations analysed in study (%)) Ryan Saha Shank Shannon Simons Sims Singer Smith CH Smith DH Smith KR Starr Stewart Struewing Strull Tabenkin Tambor Teltscher Thompson Van der Voort Van der Waal Van Ness Vertinsky Vick Weyrauch Wolf Wolinsky Woodward Yaffe Yellen ‘94 Yellen ‘95 Zemencuk 2 3 2 1 1 1 1 20 1 1 16 2 1 2 1 1 1 1 10 9 1 5 6 1 1 1 2 1 2 4 3 2 5 1 3 4 7 8 2 3 7 4 3 2 6 4 5 5 5 3 5 3 13 5 2 7 22 3 6 7 2 7 3 (0) 15 (1) 2 (0) 3 (0) 4 (0) 7 (0) 8 (0) 40 (2) 3 (0) 7 (0) 64 (3) 4 (0) 2 (0) 9 (0) 4 (0) 5 (0) 5 (0) 5 (0) 30 (1) 45 (2) 3 (0) 61 (3) 30 (1) 2 (0) 7 (0) 22 (1) 6 (0) 6 (0) 14 (1) 8 (0) 21 (1) Total Mean Maximum Minimum Median 562 3.9 40 1 2 698 4.8 28 1 4 2276 (100) 15.7 240 1 7 * Falling within the inclusion criteria for the present literature analysis.

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