Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
2003 Statistical Year Oncology Report
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

2003 Statistical Year Oncology Report

2,321
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,321
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 2003 Statistical Year Oncology Report
  • 2. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Table of Contents Committed to Cancer Care: A Message from Kester Freeman..........................................................2 Committee Membership..................................................................................................................3 2003 Cancer/Oncology Committee Goals .......................................................................................4 Goal 1: Quality Management...........................................................................................................4 Goal 2: Community Support...........................................................................................................5 Goal 3: South Carolina Comprehensive Breast Center.....................................................................9 Goal 4: Palmetto Health Prostate Cancer Center............................................................................13 Goal 5: Comprehensive GI/Colorectal Cancer Center....................................................................19 2003 Analytic cases.......................................................................................................................23 Goal 6: Support clinical and basic research. ..................................................................................24 Goal 7: Monitor and introduce promising new technologies and services. ....................................24 Statistical Summary of Cancer Data ..............................................................................................25 Cancer Data Management Activity.................................................................................................25 All Cases Diagnosed and/or Treated: Palmetto Health Baptist........................................................26 All Cases Diagnosed and/or Treated: Palmetto Health Richland....................................................27 2003 Oncology Annual Report Contributors.................................................................................28 Content Coordination....................................................................................................................29 Cancer Data Management Staff......................................................................................................29 1 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center
  • 3. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport The Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center is one of the most comprehensive programs of its kind in the Southeast. Our center is composed of physicians, researchers and caregivers from Palmetto Health Baptist, Palmetto Health Richland and the University of South Carolina. These individuals are working together with the single goal of helping each patient live life to the fullest. Our program is more than a physical location; it extends beyond four walls. In fact, it is and always has been more virtual in concept. The key to providing the best cancer care is people; experts working together as a team, from screening to diagnosis to treatment and support for children, adults and their families. It’s about providing the right care at the right time in the most appropriate setting. Currently, our program proudly boasts centers of excellence dedicated to breast, gastrointestinal and prostate cancers. In addition, we are the only hospital in the area to provide coordinated, sensitive care through dedicated Nurse Navigators – patient educators who walk our patients through a sometimes complicated process. We’re also the only program that incorporates research as an integral part of our mission. Our team of experts is looking at ways to prevent cancer and its recurrence through a variety of studies and clinical trials. In 2004, the Health Science Research Collaborative— Health Sciences South Carolina—was established to increase health sciences research, drive economic development and improve the health status of South Carolinians. The Collaborative, which will receive approximately $80 million over the next 10 years, is a partnership between Palmetto Health, Greenville Hospital System, the Medical University of South Carolina and the University of South Carolina. Despite recent changes related to outpatient service delivery, our commitment to cancer care has not wavered, and will not waver in the coming years. Teamwork is teamwork, regardless of the location in which care is delivered. Living with cancer is hard, to say the least. Our commitment to our patients is that they are not alone during this difficult journey. In fact, we strive to walk with them every step of the way, and to help them live life to the fullest. Kester S. Freeman Jr. Chief Executive Officer, Palmetto Health 2 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center Committed to Cancer Care
  • 4. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Palmetto Health Baptist PHYSICIAN MEMBERS James R. Wells, MD (Otolaryngology), Chairman Mary A. Ackerman, MD (Medical Oncology), ACoS Liaison Elijah S. Adkins, III, MD (Surgery) Joseph M. Albert, MD (Surgery) William H. Babcock, MD (Medical Oncology) Anna L. Bouknight, MD (Otolaryngology) Thomas E. Brandt, Jr., DO (Anesthesia) A. Atwell Coleman, III, MD (Pathology) Donen Davis, MD (Surgery) John H. DeWitt, MD (Psychiatry) Lawrence D. Grant, MD (Pathology) Robert P. Grumbach, MD (OB/GYN) Carl O. Kinard, MD (Psychiatry) Fred J. Kudrik, MD (Medical Oncology) William V. Lewis, MD (Pathology) Anthony D. Lowman, MD (Gastroenterology) Leland J. McElveen, MD (Medical Oncology) Victoria R. Samuels, MD (Neurosurgery) Caitlin G. Schmidt, MD (OB/GYN) Robert E. Smith, Jr., MD (Medical Oncology) Melton R. Stuckey, MD (Family Practice) Scott W. Taber, MD (Surgery) James B. Tribble, MD (Surgery) Bartlett J. Witherspoon, Jr., MD (Radiation Oncology) John E. Wofford, MD (Urology) Ben W. Wright, Jr., MD (Radiation Oncology) NON-PHYSICIAN MEMBERS Gloria Beard, MSW (Social Work Services/ Outcomes Management) Donnie Coker, MHA (Research, Clinical Trials and Cancer Data Management) Perry Covington, PharmD (Pharmacy) Mary Ellen Doyle, FACHE (Cancer Program Administration) Carolyn Evans, RN, OCN (Oncology Nursing) Rev. Irene Henderson, MDiv, ACPE Supervisor (Pastoral Services) Holly Knight, RNC, MN (Hospice and HomeCare) Sandra E. Lunden, MA, RHIA, CPHQ, CTR (Cancer Data Management) Vicki McLain, CTR (Cancer Data Management) Shelby Reece, RN, MN (Nursing Administration) Debra D. Seale, RN, MN (Oncology Support Services) Pamela Stephens (Quality Review Department) Judy Weathersbee, BS, ARRT(R) (QM) (Imaging) Palmetto Health Richland PHYSICIAN MEMBERS Neal P. Christiansen, MD (Medical Oncology), Chairman James W. Curtis, Jr., DMD (General Dentistry), Vice-Chairman James R. Wells, MD (Otolaryngology), ACoS Liaison Richard M. Bell, MD (Surgery) Roberd M. Bostick, MD (Family Practice) Raleigh J. Boulware, MD (Radiation Oncology) William M. Butler, MD (Medical Oncology) Stanley H. Greenberg, MD (Urology) Arturo E. Marchand, MD (Radiology) Kevin P. McRedmond, MD (Pediatric Oncology) Harris H. Parker, MD (Surgery Resident) Jeffrey A. Welsh, MD (Pathology) James A. Williams, Jr., MD (GYN Oncology) Gerald A. Wilson, MD (Surgery) Rudolph L. Wise, MD (Medical Oncology) NON-PHYSICIAN MEMBERS Donna Burrows, MSW (Social Work and Case Management) Donnie Coker, MHA (Clinical Trials) Mary Ellen Doyle, FACHE (Cancer Program Administration) Sandra E. Lunden, MA, RHIA, CPHQ, CTR (Cancer Data Management) Shay Garrison, RPh (Pharmacy Services) Holly Knight, RNC, MN (Hospice and HomeCare) Karen Prater (Quality Improvement) Debra D. Seale, RN, MN (Oncology Nursing) Carson Rogerson, MDiv, ACPE Supervisor (Chaplain Services) John J. Singerling, MHA, Vice President (Administration) 3 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center Committee Membership
  • 5. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport A. Monitor and report regularly to Cancer committee on Patient Satisfaction as reported by individual (nursing) units and other (department) service delivery areas and as measured by Press Ganey. Record actions taken on specific issues and report same to committee. EVALUATION: Quarterly reports reflected high patient sat- isfaction with services as evidenced by an overall average of 89.65%. For year-end FY 03, inpatient adult nursing units exceeded FY 02 averages. Pediatric oncology FY 03 year-end average = 90%, which was a slight decline from FY 02’s average of 91%. Radiation Oncology continues to achieve superior levels of patient satisfaction, placing it at the highest percentile scores for comparable hospital based radiation oncology services. All oncology services exceeded Palmetto Health’s goal of 85%. B. Monitor and report on a regular basis Quality Management/Quality Improvement activities con- ducted on a unit or department specific basis. EVALUATION: All nursing units participated in the Nursing Quality Improvement Plan activities. All service areas participated in corporate quality initia- tives, including the 2002-2003 focus on recruitment and retention of nurses, therapists and technologists. C. Monitor and report regularly to Cancer Committee outside reviews (audits) conducted in clinical trials area. EVALUATION: Outside reviews were reported to Cancer Committee quarterly. D. Conduct specific staff inservice education related to identified quality management needs. Example, planned education related to cultural diversity. Spiritual & Cultural Diversity in Cancer Care (January 21 and July 31) Two day-long conferences sponsored by the Psychosocial Oncology Committee. Integrative Medicine (March 28) Kay L. Moore, MD, FAAP, a well respected local pediatri- cian, recently completed a fellowship in Integrative Medicine. She provided the health care professionals with an overview of the concept of Integrative Medicine and popular complementary therapies. Sickle Cell Workshop (April 30) A day-long workshop for health care professionals to explain and discuss the care of patients with sickle cell disease. Living With Grief: Coping With Public Tragedy (April 30) The 10th Annual Hospice Foundation video teleconference featuring Kenneth Doka and moderated by Cokie Roberts, ABC News, was designed for health care professionals. Tea for the Soul (May 20 and October 21) Day-long workshops for health care professionals to reflect and evaluate the grieving process, coping strategies and resources and to improve our understanding and response to grief and loss. Basic Oncology Course (August 19) An overview of cancer, oncological emergencies, nutrition and survivor issues was held for health care providers. Chemotherapy Courses were presented for health care professionals. E. Conduct other QI/QM activities as identified through- out the year. EVALUATION: A variety of QI/QM activities were conducted including an initiative to reduce mislabeling of specimens, focus on patient satisfaction to reinforce caregivers’ names, reduce use of outside agency personnel, increase nursing retention, data collection for comprehensive centers and selection of qualified patient care and management staff. 4 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center The Cancer Committee of Palmetto Health Baptist, a Community Cancer Program, and the Oncology Committee of Palmetto Health Richland, a Teaching Hospital Cancer Program, each had the following annual goals and worked together to achieve success: GOAL: Conduct Quality Management/Quality Improvement activities in support of the Cancer Program. QualityManagement
  • 6. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport EVALUATION: Collaborated with the Cancer Health Initiative to provide numerous services to the communi- ty including but not limited to the following: Trumpeter Campaign (anti-tobacco use), Smoking Cessation Programs, Colorectal Cancer Awareness Walk, Real Men Checkin’ It Out grant awards to community churches, free cancer screenings for prostate, cervical, colorectal, and breast cancers for eligible individuals. Palmetto Health and the USC Arnold School of Public Health signed a collaborative agreement designed to assist in the planning, design and measurement of the commu- nity service programs. The collaboration includes pro- gram planning, cost benefit analysis, quality of life impact, client satisfaction surveys, data analysis and reporting and information resources. Palmetto Health has spent $12.1 million in community service initiatives in the past five years. Some of those initiatives include col- laborating with more than 300 non-profit agencies and community groups on their community health programs, free cancer screenings at community events and perma- nent screening sites, and smoking cessation classes. The Cancer Health Initiative has completed its sixth year of providing services to the community and addresses the following five cancers: breast, cervical, lung, prostate and cervical. The services are provided at several screening locations throughout the community. Through the use of clinics, health fairs, schools and churches, screenings are made available to the targeted population. This includes residents of Richland, Lexington, Pickens and Fairfield counties who are uninsured or underinsured. Because South Carolina has one of the highest mortality rates, an exception was made by DHEC to provide prostate cancer screenings to the general public. Smoking cessation classes also are provided to the general public. The Cancer Health Initiative screened 3,516 participants for services and performed 5,899 screenings in 2003. Fifteen cancers were found and 13 cervical dysplasias were noted. Due to a reduction in funds, screening colonoscopies were not performed this fiscal year. Age appropriate patients received a fecal occult blood test, and if they were over the age of 50 they received a refer- ral to a primary health care provider of their choice to be evaluated for further colorectal cancer screening. 5 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center GOAL: Support Palmetto Health Cancer Health Initiative for cancer education, cancer prevention and early detection of cancer. Involve Palmetto Health departments/services in support of the Cancer Health Initiative to maximize benefit to the community. Screening Test FY 02 FY 02 Cancer Outcomes FY 03 FY 03 Cancer Outcomes Clinical Breast Exams 772 9 Breast Cancers 769 3 Breast Cancers Mammograms 611 * 668 * Pelvic Exams 890 0 815 Pap Smears 873 7 Cervical dysplasias 761 13 Cervical dysplasias Fecal Occult 0 0 0 0 Flexible Sigmoidoscopy 0 0 0 – Colonoscopy 100 2 Colon cancers 0 – Digital Rectal Exam 486 None 474 – Prostate Specific Test 2,496 14 Prostate Cancers 1,968 12 Prostate Cancers Smoking Classes 652 N/A 444 N/A Grand Totals 6,879 25 5,899 15 * Breast Cancers detected by an abnormal mammogram/clinical breast exam are noted under clinical breast exam outcomes CommunitySupport
  • 7. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Smoking Cessation Classes (Monthly Sessions) In collaboration with the USC Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, free smoking cessation classes were offered. A comprehensive adult program combines coun- seling and medical interventions to help patients over- come their smoking dependency. The three-week series of classes meet twice a week and are offered every month. Three classes address motivational strategies and three others are devoted to the skill training needed to accomplish the goal. The program also included a free medical consultation with a family medicine physician, so those participants can utilize medical intervention, such as a free three-month supply of Zyban. The teen smoking cessation program is devoted exclusively to behavior modification; no medications are involved. Records show 444 participants went to at least one or more of these classes. At the end of treatment, 78.9% of the participants were abstinent from smoking. Since Palmetto Health started the adult classes in 2000, more than 1,000 participants have completed the adult course. It costs approximately $400 per participant to fund the adult program. Community Care, an educational newsletter from the Palmetto Health Office of Community Services about cancer and healthy lifestyles, is distributed monthly to more than 12,000 citizens in the Columbia area. Smoking Ain’t Blazin’ (March 29) In collaboration with Zion Baptist Church and the American Cancer Society, Coalition for a Tobacco Free Midlands, SC African American Tobacco Control Network, SC Community Bank and SC Primary Health Care Association, sponsored a mini-conference to prevent smoking among all teens and young adults ages 10-19. Women’s Health Day (May 3) In collaboration with Richland Community Health Care Association, a day of health screenings designed just for women was held including pap smears, mammograms, HIV testing and diabetes screening. Men’s Health Programs (June 7 and 14, October 11) Educational programs to raise awareness of men’s health issues including cancer, HIV/AIDS and diabetes with subsequent health screenings. Trumpeter Campaign and Contest (Fall and Spring) Beginning with Red Ribbon week in the fall of the school year, trained volunteer speakers shared the powerful influence of tobacco advertising with area sixth grade students. The educational program provided information on the damaging effects of tobacco, skills to diffuse peer pressure to use tobacco products and awareness of tobacco advertising. Nineteen schools participated in the educational campaign with more than 40 presentations reaching about 1,000 students. A contest in the spring allowed almost twice as many students to compete for cash prizes by creating counter- advertisements to tobacco messages. The contest awarded $5,325 to middle school students in school districts throughout Richland and Lexington counties. Great American Smokeout Held annually the third Thursday in November, Palmetto Health collaborated with the University of South Carolina Wellness Center to sponsor the Great American Smokeout. Pledge cards were given to those smokers who committed to no smoking for a day. Literature and education was provided regarding the effects of cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Four hun- dred people signed pledged cards. 6 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center CommunitySupport
  • 8. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Additional Community Outreach Good Grieving (January 27 and February 3; April 21 and 28; July 14 and 21; October 6 and 13) A year-long program held on a quarterly basis for adults who care for grieving children to help them cope with loss and death. Good Grieving for Children (February 3, April 28, July 21, October 13) An interactive and fun program designed to help children who have experienced the death of a family member. Look Good, Feel Better (February 3, March 3, May 5, June 2, August 4, September 8, November 3 and December 1) Cancer patients were educated on ways to manage hair loss and other changes affecting appearance and self-image. A virtual library debuted for staff on the Palmetto Health Intranet and was available to search the database for journal articles (February 27.) Quest (March 11, May 13, August 12 and November 11) A unique hands-on educational and support program designed for children and teens who have a parent or grandparent living with cancer. SunSmart Awareness (April – September) The SunSmart skin cancer awareness program included daily UV index readings on our website (PalmettoHealth.com) to help avoid harmful UV rays and sunburns. In addition, our mascot, Sunny, made appear- ances and offered SunSmart tips at community events. 16th Annual Spring Memorial Service was offered for families and staff of the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders. Lunch and Learn: Putting Illness in Its Place is an educational series for parents of children who have cancer or a blood disorder (spring and fall.) Brett’s Rainbow (April 26-27 at Camp St. Christopher, John’s Island, SC, and October 11-12 at White Oak Conference Center, White Oak, SC) A special weekend camp offered to children ages 6 to 16 who have experienced the death of a family mem- ber or other significant person in their lives. The camp is offered free of charge and is made possible by com- munity contributions to Palmetto Health Hospice. National Cancer Survivors Day (May 31) The local celebration was held at Seawell’s Banquet and Reception Center in Columbia. The event was cospon- sored by the American Cancer Society, Dorn VA Hospital, Moncrief Army Community Hospital, Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center and South Carolina Oncology Associates. I Can Cope (May – June) A series of classes for people facing cancer. 24th Annual Camp Kemo A week-long summer camp for patients 5-18 years of age and their siblings. Staffed by our physicians, nurses and volunteers, the camp offers swimming, boating, and hiking with a specialty focus on letting these campers simply enjoy childhood. Family Weekend Retreat for the Children’s Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders: An educational/ recreational weekend for families who have had a child diagnosed with cancer in the past two years. Camp New Horizons A weekend bereavement camp to help brothers and sisters who have lost a sibling through the grieving process. Integrative Medicine Community Forum (September 23) Kay L. Moore, MD, FAAP, a well respected local pediatri- cian, recently completed a fellowship in Integrative Medicine. She provided an overview of the concept of Integrative Medicine, popular complementary therapies and answered questions from the audience. 7 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center CommunitySupport
  • 9. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Family Telephone Support Group for Blood Cancers A telephone support group intended for patients who have blood disorders including leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma. Bridging the Bereavement Gap A six-week series of educational programs designed to help those who have lost a loved one through the grief process towards hope and healing. Lasting Impressions Teen Support Group A support group and program designed for teenagers with cancer. Arts & Healing® Using a variety of artists, this series of programs for cancer patients and families helps them learn positive ways to express feelings, increase coping skills, uncover inner resources and find a deep wellspring of emotional healing. Bloch Foundation Cancer Survivors Garden Worked with the Cultural Council of Richland and Lexington counties and other community sponsors to create and develop the Richard and Annette Bloch Cancer Survivors Garden at Maxcy Gregg Park. Tools for Healthier Living A monthly mind/body series that focused on learning and practicing approaches to decrease stress and improve health. Healing Icons (September – October) A five-session support group designed for grieving adults to use art to discover their inner resources for coping with grief. Second Tuesdays A new way of providing support and information to cancer patients and families was launched in September. Individual groups for prostate, women’s cancer, leukemia, lymphoma and myeloma, and families of patients were all held concurrently. Women’s Cancers The group focused on self care and provided an oppor- tunity for women to meet and share with other women who have ovarian, cervical and uterine cancers (started in September.) Handling the Holidays (November 4 and 11) Helping adults who have experienced a loss learn how to cope during the holiday season. Preparing for the Holidays Part of the bereavement programs, this class was offered for parents whose children had died. Healing Service (November 11) A special program conducted by a pastor and social worker to help cancer patients and families learn about emotional, physical and spiritual healing. Celebrating the Holidays A seasonal program offering inpatient parties and fulfilling “wish list” items for patients and their families. 8 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center CommunitySupport
  • 10. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Weekly Breast Cancer Conferences were held at both Palmetto Health Baptist and Richland for the purpose of pre-treatment planning and presenta- tion of follow-up cases. Buddy Call 19 Nationally recognized Buddy Call program promoting monthly breast self-examination (BSE) cosponsored by Palmetto Health’s South Carolina Comprehensive Breast Center and CBS affiliate WLTX-19. Over 84,000 women participated in the program to date. A Grand Affair (January 16) The Palmetto Health South Carolina Comprehensive Breast Center booth at the annual senior health fair held at the SC State Fairgrounds attracted some 6,000-8,000 participants throughout the day. MARYS (Also known as Meeting And Reviving Your Spirit.) Celia Saxon Health Center was the site of the initial kickoff in April for an ongoing program intended for African American breast cancer patients. 8th Annual Spring Breast Symposium (May 3) The symposium is for physicians, nurses and other healthcare professionals interested in the current con- cepts of diagnosis and management of breast cancer. Featured speakers included Frank A. Vicini, MD, Radiation Oncology at William Beaumont Hospital; and Andrew D. Seidman, MD, Breast Cancer Medicine Service of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Bosom Buddies A monthly support group for breast cancer survivors. Family Group A monthly support group for family members of breast cancer survivors; the group met at the same time as the Bosom Buddies support group. “Sentinel Lymph Node Examination by Frozen Section in Breast Cancer Patients” Published by James C. Reynolds, MD, in the June 2003 issue of The Journal of the South Carolina Medical Association. Lymphedema Education The monthly program offered lymphedema prevention and treatment information for patients following breast cancer surgery. 13th Annual First Ladies’ Walk for Life: Steps Against Breast Cancer (October 4) 9,100 people registered for this three-mile walk to increase awareness, education and the early detection of breast cancer. Breast Self-Exam Shower Cards Explaining how to perform monthly breast and testicular self-exams, these cards were distributed to all Palmetto Health Columbia employees as part of an initiative to heighten awareness of preventive healthcare and the early detection of cancer. South Carolina Comprehensive Breast Center Progress Report (October 15) A formal presentation on the progress towards achieving desired goals and objectives presented to the medical, administrative and ancillary support staff of the Comprehensive Breast Center. Breast Cancer Awareness Fair November 8 “Let’s Talk About It - Come and Get the Facts and Celebrate Life.” A health fair at Francis Burns United Methodist Church designed to educate African American women in the community to improve screening and the early detection of breast cancer. 9 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center GOAL: Advance the Palmetto Health South Carolina Comprehensive Breast Center. BreastCancer
  • 11. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Awareness Initiatives The Breast Cancer Nurse Navigators provided educational presentations to various audiences in the community throughout the year. Some of those audiences included students, faculty and parents at Allen University, A.C. Flora High School, the University of South Carolina and area elementary schools. Numerous other presentations were provided at churches, local businesses and community health fairs to reach out to thousands of South Carolinians. The following poster was presented at the American Society of Breast Diseases Conference in Dallas, Tex., summarizing the achievements of the South Carolina Comprehensive Breast Center (April 10-12, 2003): 10 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center BreastCancer
  • 12. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 11 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 600 Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Female Breast Palmetto Health 1995-1996 Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Months PercentSurviving 20 40 60 80 100 1 year 2 years 3 years 4 years 5 years Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Female Breast National* 1995-1996 *Source: NCDB, Commission on Cancer, ACoS/ACS Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Years PercentSurviving 0 20 40 60 80 100 BreastCancer
  • 13. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 12 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 600 0 20 40 60 80 100 Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Female Breast Palmetto Health 1998-2003 Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Months PercentSurviving 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 600 0 20 40 60 80 100 Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Female Breast National* 1998-2003 *Source: CIRF (Cancer Information Reference File), IMPAC/MRS Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Months PercentSurviving BreastCancer
  • 14. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Changing the Legacy… Prostate Cancer Town Hall Meeting, Real Men Checkin’ It Out, Harambé, and HealthWorks These and other prostate cancer screenings were con- ducted throughout the year. Through these collaborative Palmetto Health efforts, close to 2,000 men were screened for prostate cancer in 2003. Changing the Legacy… Prostate Cancer Town Hall Meeting (September 4) Palmetto Health’s Cancer Health Initiative sponsored its second Town Hall Meeting. The purpose of the meeting was cancer education and prevention to communities of color. Nationally known motivational speaker and prostate cancer survivor Les Brown was the keynote speaker for the event. A physician panel was available for a question and answer period. Two events were held with an estimated total of 1,000 people in attendance. Real Men Checkin’ It Out Palmetto Health’s Cancer Health Initiative and the SC DHEC Office of Minority Health teamed up to offer a church based mini-grant program to promote awareness, education and screenings for prostate cancer. The hugely successful faith-based program is in its fourth year of funding. Twenty-eight churches were given a stipend of up to $1,500 each to recruit at least 40 men. Through this effort 914 men were screened. Since its inception in 2000, the program has awarded more than $200,000 to nearly 80 churches and civic organizations. Harambé Benedict College hosts an annual African American Heritage Celebration Month called Harambé. Through this event, Palmetto Health’s Cancer Health Initiative was able to screen men who would not ordinarily come to churches or established clinics. One hundred men were screened through this effort. HealthWorks The Palmetto Health Cancer Health Initiative worked with HealthWorks, Palmetto Health’s employee wellness and occupational health department, to target area worksites for uninsured and underinsured workers. Through this effort, 530 men were screened for prostate cancer. Screening services were performed at the South Carolina Department of Transportation, South Carolina Department of Mental Health, Brennan Elementary School, DHEC, Hyatt Park Elementary School, Department of Social Services, Ridgeview High School and Columbia High School. Prostate Cancer Community Forum (July 29) An educational program designed for community participants to learn more about the latest advances in the treatment of prostate cancer with prostate seed implants. Palmetto Health is one of the first ten sites in the nation to acquire the new delivery system, called Nucletron FIRST. The system arrived in June and the first patients were treated in July. Monthly Prostate Cancer Conferences These were held to discuss pre-treatment planning, review of best practices and discussion of the latest scientific research. Prostate Cancer Group A monthly support group designed for prostate cancer survivors and their wife or significant other. 13 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center GOAL: Advance the Palmetto Health Prostate Cancer Center. ProstateCancer
  • 15. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 14 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center First Course Therapy - 2003 Analytic Prostate T1 Palmetto Health 110 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health *Total includes all referrals Cases Radiation Hormone SurgeryNo Treatment Surgery/ Radiation Hormone/ Radiation 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 66 29 5 4 3 3 Cases 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 First Course Therapy - 2003 Analytic Prostate T1 Palmetto Health 83 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health *Total does not include patients referred by Moncrief Army Hospital or Dorn VA Hospital Cases Radiation 47 22 5 4 3 2 Hormone SurgeryNo Treatment Surgery/ Radiation Hormone/ Radiation Method of Detection - 2003 Analytic Prostate Cancer Palmetto Health 301 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health *Total includes all referrals Cases 0 50 Elevated PSA 268 9 1 12 11 Abnormal DRE Pain Other Not Specified 100 150 200 250 300 Method of Detection - 2003 Analytic Prostate Cancer Palmetto Health 249 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health *Total does not include patients referred by Moncrief Army Hospital or Dorn VA Hospital Cases 0 50 Elevated PSA 217 8 1 12 11 Abnormal DRE Pain Other Not Specified 100 150 200 250 300 ProstateCancer
  • 16. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 15 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center First Course Therapy - 2003 Analytic Prostate T2 Palmetto Health 150 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health *Total includes all referrals Cases RadiationSurgery Hormone/ Radiation No Treatment Hormone/ Surgery Hormone/ Surgery/ Radiation Hormone/ Radiation/ Chemo 84 39 21 2 2 1 1 0 20 40 60 80 100 First Course Therapy - 2003 Analytic Prostate T2 Palmetto Health 126 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Cases RadiationSurgery Hormone/ Radiation No Treatment Hormone/ Surgery Hormone/ Surgery/ Radiation Hormone/ Radiation/ Chemo 84 22 2 1 1 0 20 40 60 80 100 1 *Total does not include patients referred by Moncrief Army Hospital or Dorn VA Hospital 15 First Course Therapy - 2003 Analytic Prostate T3 Palmetto Health 31 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health *Total includes all referrals Cases RadiationSurgery Hormone/ Radiation Surgery/ Radiation Hormone 0 20 40 60 80 100 6 3 3 1 18 First Course Therapy - 2003 Analytic Prostate T3 Palmetto Health 29 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Cases Surgery Hormone/ Radiation 0 20 40 60 80 100 5 Surgery/ Radiation 3 Hormone 3 18 *Total does not include patients referred by Moncrief Army Hospital or Dorn VA Hospital ProstateCancer
  • 17. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 16 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center Age at Diagnosis by AJCC Stage 2003 Analytic Cases - Prostate Palmetto Health 301 Cases* Age at Diagnosis Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 N/A Total Percent 0-29 0 0 0 0 0 0 30-39 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% 40-49 9 0 0 0 9 2.9% 50-59 82 11 4 0 97 32.2% 60-69 95 10 5 2 112 37.2% 70-79 63 6 2 0 71 23.5% 80-89 8 0 1 0 9 2.9% 90+ 1 0 1 0 2 0.6% Total 259 27 13 2 301 *Total includes all referrals Age at Diagnosis by AJCC Stage 2003 Analytic Cases - Prostate Palmetto Health 249 Cases** Age at Diagnosis Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 N/A Total Percent 0-29 0 0 0 0 0 0 30-39 1 0 0 0 1 0.4% 40-49 6 0 0 0 6 2.4% 50-59 64 10 4 0 78 31.3% 60-69 76 10 4 2 92 36.9% 70-79 53 6 2 0 61 24.4% 80-89 8 0 1 0 9 3.6% 90+ 1 0 1 0 2 0.8% Total 209 26 12 2 249 **Total does not include patients referred by Moncrief Army Hospital or Dorn VA Hospital Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health 2003 Analytic Prostate by Gleason Score Palmetto Health 301 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Cases Gleason 5 Gleason 6 Gleason 7 Gleason 8 Gleason 9 Gleason 10 Not Specified 5 134 104 34 8 5 11 0 30 60 90 120 150 *Total includes all referrals 2003 Analytic Prostate by Gleason Score Palmetto Health 249 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Cases Gleason 5 Gleason 6 Gleason 7 Gleason 8 Gleason 9 Gleason 10 Not Specified 4 107 29 8 5 9 *Total does not include patients referred by Moncrief Army Hospital or Dorn VA Hospital 0 30 60 90 120 150 87 ProstateCancer
  • 18. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 17 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 600 0 20 40 60 80 100 Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Prostate Palmetto Health 1995-1996 Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Months PercentSurviving 1 year 2 years 3 years 4 years 5 years Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Prostate National* 1995-1996 *Source: NCDB, Commission on Cancer, ACoS/ACS Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Years PercentSurviving 20 40 60 80 100 ProstateCancer
  • 19. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 600 0 20 40 60 80 100 Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Prostate Palmetto Health 1998-2003 Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Months PercentSurviving 0 20 40 60 80 100 Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Prostate National* 1998-2003 *Source: CIRF (Cancer Information Reference File), IMPAC/MRS Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Months PercentSurviving 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 600 18 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center ProstateCancer
  • 20. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Colorectal Cancer Awareness Walk (March 8) More than 400 people participated in the third annual walk at Riverfront Park to raise awareness about colorectal cancer and the importance of early detection through screening. Colorectal Cancer Awareness (March 25) An educational dinner program featuring motiva- tional speaker and cancer survivor Eddie Leigh was held for colorectal cancer patients, their families and the community. The first site-specific Gastrointestinal (GI) Cancer Conference was held October 21. This CME-approved monthly, multidisciplinary conference focused on case presentations for collab- orative treatment planning. 19 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center GOAL: Begin plans for a Comprehensive GI/Colorectal Cancer Center. 2003 Analytic Digestive System Cancers Palmetto Health Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Colon 43.2% All Other 18.3% Rectum 15.2% Stomach 9.9% Pancreas 7.1% Esophagus 6.2% 2003 Analytic Colon - Distribution by Subsite Palmetto Health Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health C180-Cecum 24.5% C186-Descending 9.4% C183-Hepatic 5.8% C189-Colon-NOS 2.9% C188-Overlap 0.7% C185-Splenic 2.9% C184-Transverse 5.8%C181-Appendix 2.9% C187-Sigmoid 28.1% C182-Ascending 17.3% 2003 Analytic Colon - Male vs. Female by Age at Diagnosis Palmetto Health *139 cases Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health *Duplicate patients merged 0 5 10 15 20 90+80-8970-7960-6950-5940-4930-390-29 Male Female Age Distribution 1 0 1 3 4 8 17 17 10 15 14 18 12 17 0 2 Cases GI/ColorectalCancer
  • 21. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 20 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center First Course Therapy - 2003 Analytic Colon Palmetto Health 139 Cases* Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health *Duplicate patients merged Cases Surgery Surgery/ Chemo All Other Chemo No Treatment Palliative Surgery 2334 91 0 20 40 60 80 100 36 Age at Diagnosis by AJCC Stage 2003 Analytic Cases - Colon Palmetto Health 139 Cases Age at Diagnosis Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 N/A Total Percent 0-29 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0.7% 30-39 0 1 1 1 1 0 4 2.9% 40-49 1 1 0 4 5 1 12 8.6% 50-59 4 7 3 7 13 0 34 24.5% 60-69 3 4 9 5 3 1 25 18.0% 70-79 3 10 5 9 5 0 32 23.0% 80-89 2 9 5 7 5 1 29 20.9% 90+ 0 0 0 2 0 0 2 1.4% Total 13 32 23 35 33 3 139 Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health GI/ColorectalCancer
  • 22. 1 year 2 years 3 years 4 years 5 years Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Colon National* 1995-1996 *Source: NCDB, Commission on Cancer, ACoS/ACS Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Years PercentSurviving 0 20 40 60 80 100 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 21 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 600 0 20 40 60 80 100 Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Colon Palmetto Health 1995-1996 Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Stage 0 Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Months PercentSurviving GI/ColorectalCancer
  • 23. 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 600 0 20 40 60 80 100 Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Colon National* 1998-2003 Source: CIRF (Cancer Information Reference File), IMPAC/MRS Stage 1Stage 0 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Months PercentSurviving 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 22 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27 30 33 36 39 42 45 48 51 54 57 600 0 20 40 60 80 100 Life Table Survival by Best AJCC Stage - Colon Palmetto Health 1998-2003 Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Stage 1Stage 0 Stage 2 Stage 3 Stage 4 Number of Months PercentSurviving GI/ColorectalCancer
  • 24. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 23 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center 2003 Analytic Cases - Frequency of Cancer Palmetto Health Baptist Bronchus & Lung 13.4% Colon 7.1% Prostate 15.6% Breast 28.3% All Other 30.2% Bladder 5.5% 2003 Analytic Cases - Frequency of Cancer Palmetto Health Richland Source: Cancer Data Management, Palmetto Health Bronchus & Lung 12.9% Colon 6.6% Prostate 12.5% Breast 20.8% All Other 38.5% Corpus Uteri 8.7% GeneralSummary
  • 25. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport EVALUATION: Palmetto Health continued to support basic research through its relationship with the University of South Carolina and grant endeavors. Further develop- ment of coordinated efforts in basic research and popula- tion studies is demonstrated by the collaboration of the South Carolina Cancer Center and Medical University of South Carolina in epidemiological research. Clinical research continues to advance affiliations with the Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP), and through the participation of medical staff in promising pharmaceutical studies. Preliminary steps were taken to establish an IRB approved South Carolina Cancer Center Tissue Bank which was previously piloted with breast cancer tissue (for the purpose of gene microarray work). The Cancer Tissue Bank located in 14 Medical Park will expand to include more than breast cancer tissue; tissue will be made available to researchers under protocols. Ian Thompson, MD, the creator of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), discussed the importance of this national trial during a brunch celebration of our local PCPT participants’ commitment to the prevention of prostate cancer (January 11.) EVALUATION: The completion of 2003 marks the first full year of mammosite treatments for breast cancer, the start of Nucletron FIRST prostate seed implants in the treat- ment of prostate cancer, and approved funding for the purchase of full field digital mammography equipment, expected to arrive in 2004. Palmetto Health finalized plans to transform hospital based radiation oncology to a community based partnership with physicians. Pediatric Oncology/Hematology services was approved for a grant-supported position to conduct a late effects clinic that should be operational in mid 2004. The Palmetto Richland Advocacy Program (PRAP) completed a third grant-supported year working with youth who have chronic illnesses such as sickle cell disease induced strokes, brain tumors and hemophilia. PRAP has been successful in securing additional funding to continue through 2004. 24 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center GOAL: Support clinical and basic research. GOAL: Monitor and introduce promising new technologies and services. ResearchandNewTechnology
  • 26. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 25 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center Statistical Summary of Cancer Data Statistical Year 2003 Palmetto Health Baptist Total Cases 1,221 Analytic Cases 1,134 Top Five Sites Breast, Prostate, Lung, Colon, Bladder Patient Population 68.2% Caucasian, 28% African-American, 3.7% Other Distribution by County Richland 50.7%, Lexington, 18.2%, Kershaw 7.0%, Newberry 5.4%, Fairfield 4.8%, Orangeburg 2.6%, other 11.1% Early Stage Disease (Stage Group 0, I, II) 61.1% Palmetto Health Richland Total Cases 1,123 Analytic Cases 990 Top Five Sites Breast, Lung, Prostate, Corpus Uteri, Colon Patient Population 57.1% Caucasian, 41.3% African-American, 1.5% Other Distribution by County Richland 45.3%, Lexington 10.5%, Kershaw 7.6%, Sumter 5.1%, Orangeburg 4.6%, Fairfield 3.8%, Newberry 2.7%, other 20.4% Early Stage Disease (Stage Group 0, I, II) 52.8% Cancer Data Management Activity Analytic Year 2003 2003 Palmetto Health Baptist 2003 Palmetto Health Richland Complete Database 22,703 20,488 Total Cases 1,221 1,123 Analytic Cases 1,134 990 % Analytic Cases 92.7% 88.0% Follow-up Rate 95.8% 94.8% Cases Presented at Cancer Conference 614 449 General 116 96 Breast 458 313 Prostate 31 31 GI 9 9 % Analytic Cases Presented 54.1% 45.3% % Prospective Cases Presented at Cancer Conference 99.8% 99.1% Average Physician Attendance At Cancer Conference 20 17 Cases AJCC Staged by Managing Physician 90.6% 94.4% Clinical Trials 21% 18% GeneralSummary
  • 27. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 26 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center All Cases Diagnosed and/or Treated Palmetto Health Baptist AGE GROUP PRIMARY SITE 0-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80-89 90+ Cases ORAL CAVITY/PHARYNX 17 Tongue 1 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 4 Mouth 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 Parotid Gland 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 3 Tonsil 0 1 1 1 2 0 0 0 5 Pyriform Sinus 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 2 Pharynx 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 DIGESTIVE SYSTEM 190 Esophagus 0 0 2 2 2 1 1 0 8 Stomach 0 0 0 4 6 3 0 0 13 Small Intestine 0 0 1 5 2 1 0 0 9 Colon 1 2 7 18 17 19 14 2 80 Rectosigmoid Junction 0 0 2 2 4 3 0 0 11 Rectum 0 1 5 10 4 8 3 0 31 Anus and Anal Canal 0 1 2 3 1 4 1 0 12 Liver 1 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 5 Gallbladder 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 Pancreas 0 0 1 0 3 8 1 0 13 Other and Unspecified Biliary Tract 0 0 1 1 1 2 1 0 6 RESPIRATORY SYSTEM 161 Larynx 0 0 2 1 4 1 1 0 9 Bronchus and Lung 0 1 4 36 47 50 13 1 152 BONES/JOINTS/ARTICULAR CARTILAGE 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 HEMATOPOIETIC/RETICULO-ENDOTHELIAL SYSTEM 0 2 1 3 5 6 2 0 19 SKIN 0 0 3 4 1 3 0 0 11 PERIPHERAL NERVES/AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 2 RETROPERITONEUM AND PERITONEUM 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 SOFT TISSUE 0 0 4 1 2 0 1 0 8 BREAST 1 13 64 91 74 49 28 1 321 FEMALE GENITAL ORGANS 29 Vulva 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Cervix Uteri 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 0 5 Corpus Uteri 0 1 4 3 5 3 2 0 18 Ovary 0 0 1 0 1 1 1 0 4 Other and Unspecified Female Genital Organs 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 MALE GENITAL ORGANS 190 Penis 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 Prostate 0 1 4 66 66 34 5 1 177 Testes 4 5 0 1 0 0 0 0 10 URINARY TRACT 110 Kidney 0 0 8 2 10 10 3 1 34 Renal Pelvis 0 0 0 1 2 4 0 0 7 Ureter 0 0 0 1 2 1 3 0 7 Bladder 1 0 1 13 13 22 12 0 62 EYE AND BRAIN 13 Eye and Adnexa 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Brain 1 0 0 4 2 3 2 0 12 THYROID AND ADRENAL GLANDS 29 Thyroid Gland 5 8 8 3 1 2 1 0 28 Adrenal Gland 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 OTHER AND ILL-DEFINED SITES 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 LYMPH NODES 1 1 3 1 4 8 0 0 18 UNKNOWN PRIMARY SITE 0 0 4 3 2 1 3 0 13 ALL SITES 18 38 136 288 291 255 103 6 1,134 GeneralSummary
  • 28. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 27 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center All Cases Diagnosed and/or Treated Palmetto Health Richland AGE GROUP PRIMARY SITE 0-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80-89 90+ Cases ORAL CAVITY/PHARYNX 36 Lip 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 Tongue 0 0 2 4 4 1 0 0 11 Mouth 0 0 3 2 1 1 0 0 7 Parotid Gland 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Tonsil 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 5 Oropharynx 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 0 3 Nasopharynx 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3 Pyriform Sinus 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 3 Hypopharynx 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 DIGESTIVE SYSTEM 149 Esophagus 0 0 3 5 1 3 1 0 13 Stomach 0 0 3 6 5 8 1 0 23 Small Intestine 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 3 Colon 0 2 6 19 8 13 17 0 65 Rectosigmoid Junction 0 0 0 3 1 2 0 0 6 Rectum 0 0 3 5 6 3 4 0 21 Liver 2 0 1 0 0 2 2 0 7 Pancreas 0 2 0 1 4 1 2 1 11 RESPIRATORY SYSTEM AND INTRATHORACIC ORGANS 147 Larynx 0 0 4 5 3 2 0 0 14 Bronchus and Lung 0 1 13 22 40 45 6 1 128 Thymus 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 Heart/Mediastinum 2 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 4 BONES/JOINTS/ARTICULAR CARTILAGE 7 1 0 2 0 1 0 0 11 HEMATOPOIETIC/RETICULO-ENDOTHELIAL SYSTEM 6 3 1 3 4 7 3 1 28 SKIN 3 2 0 4 1 4 1 0 15 RETROPERITONEUM AND PERITONEUM 1 0 0 4 0 0 0 0 5 SOFT TISSUE 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 0 7 BREAST 1 17 38 51 52 36 11 0 206 FEMALE GENITAL ORGANS 181 Vulva 0 0 2 0 0 1 1 1 5 Cervix Uteri 4 4 6 12 3 4 1 1 35 Corpus Uteri 3 8 20 19 27 9 1 87 Ovary 1 1 2 10 13 16 5 0 48 Other and Unspecified Female Genital Organs 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 0 4 MALE GENITAL ORGANS 127 Prostate 0 0 5 31 46 37 4 1 124 Testes 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Other and Unspecified Male Genital Organs 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 URINARY TRACT 15 Kidney 0 1 1 4 0 1 0 0 7 Renal Pelvis 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 Ureter 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 Bladder 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 5 Other Urinary Organs 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 EYE AND BRAIN 22 Eye and Adnexa 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 Brain 8 3 2 4 1 1 2 0 21 THYROID/OTHER ENDOCRINE GLANDS 7 Thyroid Gland 1 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 5 Adrenal Gland 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 Other Endocrine Glands 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 OTHER AND ILL-DEFINED SITES 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 LYMPH NODES 3 3 6 4 2 4 0 0 22 UNKNOWN PRIMARY SITE 0 0 0 3 4 2 3 0 12 ALL SITES 46 48 116 232 234 231 78 7 990 GeneralSummary
  • 29. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport 28 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center 2003 Oncology Annual Report Contributors Mary A. Ackerman, M.D Gwendolyn Green, RN John W. Popp Jr., MD Julian Adams, MD Stanley Greenberg, MD William Rambo, MD Joseph M. Albert, MD Janet Groves John C. Rawl, MD Elizabeth Allen, MSW Paul Guerry III, MD Shelby Reece, RN, MN J.R. Allison, MD Crickett Harris, RN James C. Reynolds, MD Stanton Atkins, MD Chuck Heaton, MD Neal Reynolds, MD Gene Ayers, MD James R. Hebert, MSPH, ScD A.J. Richards, MD William H. Babcock, MD Sue Heiney, RN, PhD, FAAN Chad Rubin, MD Phillip E. Baldwin, MD Nichole Hendry, C-PA William Savoca, MD Nancy Barnes, RN James H. Herlong, MD Caitlin Schmidt, MD John Bayard, MD Carey Hite, MD Debra D. Seale, RN, MN Karen Baxley, RN, MN Jennifer Hooks, PA Paresh Shah, MD John G. Beasley, MD Charles Hubbard Jr, MD Joseph Sheppe, MD Richard Bell, MD George Jenkins, MD John Singerling, MHA John Boon, MD Spence Jenkins, MD Bessie Smith, RN Anna Bouknight, MD Betty Johnson, RN Robert E. Smith Jr., MD Raleigh J. Boulware, MD Ram Kalus, MD Barbara Smoak, RN Karen Brooks, MS, CGC Donna Keisler, CTR Lisa Spigner John Brown, MD John Kewkirk, MD Rosemond Squirewell, RN Rex Brugh, MD Phillip W. Kinder, MD Louise Stepp, LMSW Donna Bucalo Elvira Kisteneff, MD Melton Stuckey, MD Douglas M. Bull, MD Holly Knight, RNC, MN Darin Sutton, MD Robert Bunch, MD Kristy Koon, BA John Sutton III, MD Ronald Burns, MD Brent Krantz, MD C. Alden Sweatman Jr, MD William M. Butler, MD Fred Kudrik, MD Daniel Sylvester, MD Heidi Campbell, RN Alice Lathrop, Asc. RT (R) Scott W. Taber, MD Neal P. Christiansen, MD John Lauver, MD Nguyen Thieu, MD Donnie Coker, MHA Isabel Law, RN John Thomas, MD Atwell Coleman, MD William Lewis, MD David Tribble, MD Perry Covington, PharmD Mark Lovern, MD James B. Tribble, MD Tommy E. Cupples, MD Sandra Lunden, MA, RHIA, CPHQ, CTR Diane Truesdale, MD Everett Dargan, MD Jason Lynn, MD Allan Walls, MD Donen Davis, MD Chinway Majmundar, MD Richard Wassermann, MD Martin Dommers, MD Auturo Marchand, MD Judy Weathersbee, BS, ARRT(R)(QM) Mary Ellen Doyle, FACHE Mark Mayson, MD John Webb Thomas Edmunds Jr, MD L. Joseph McElveen, MD James R. Wells, MD Elaine Elkins, RN William Meredith, MD Jeffrey A. Welsh, MD Carolyn Evans, RN, OCN Harry Metropol, MD Thomas White, PhD Karen Ferguson, PA Stephen Metropol, MD Jimmy Williams, MD Tonya Flake, RN Balbir Minhas, MD Dennis Wilson, MD Harold Freidman, MD Joan Minor, RN, BSN, OCN Gerald Wilson, MD Samuel Freidman, MD Martin Mirra, MD Bartlett J. Witherspoon, MD Jeanette Fulton, MD Joe Modzelewski, MD Rudolph Wise, MD Jorge Galan, MD Phyllis Moorer, RT (R)(M) Dottye Wodogaza, RN, OCN Burnett W. Gallman, MD Kevin Morgan, MD John E. Wofford, MD Edsel Garrick, MD Sidney Morrison, MD Ben W. Wright Jr, MD David Gatti, MD William Neglia, MD Theresa Williamson Thomas Glazebrook, MD John Newkirk, MD Ann Vandersteenhoven, MD Francisco Gonzalez, MD James Nottingham, MD Jacob Vandersteenhoven, MD Kathleen K. Goodwin, RN Tally Parrot, MD Robert Young, PhD Kenneth Grant, MD George Postic, MD Mohammed Yousufuddin, MD Larry Grant, MD Dalton Prickett, MD
  • 30. 2003StatisticalYearOncologyReport Content Coordination Scottie Dye Donna Keisler Sandra E. Lunden Debra D. Seale Cancer Data Management Staff January 2003 – December 2004 Pamela Commins Stacy Gurley Rebecca Heaberlin, RHIT, CTR Faith Johnson Angela Jones Donna Keisler, CTR Kristen Lauing Dyonne Louden, CTR Sandra Lunden, MA, RHIA, CPHQ, CTR Vicki McLain, RHIT, CTR Monique Motley Patricia Peake Laura Willis, RHIA, CTR Brandi Zanfardino, RHIT • The 2003 Statistical Year Oncology Report is in loving memory of our friend, Sandy Lunden (1948 -2004), Manager of Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center - Cancer Data Management department; respected colleague and courageous cancer survivor. • 29 Palmetto Health South Carolina Cancer Center Links to other web sites: American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer http://www.facs.org/cancer/ National Comprehensive Cancer Network http://www.nccn.org South Carolina Cancer Alliance http://www.sccanceralliance.org/tiki-index.php SC DHEC Central Cancer Registry http://www.scdhec.net/co/phsis/biostatistics/SCCCR/scccrmain.htm http://www.scdhec.net/co/phsis/biostatistics/SCCCR/AboutARegistry.htm
  • 31. 2 0 0 3 S t a t i s t i c a l Y e a r O n c o l o g y R e p o r t Seven Richland Medical Park Columbia, South Carolina 29203 and Taylor at Marion Street Columbia, South Carolina 29220 p a l m e t t o h e a l t h . o r g 803-296-3000 Patients are admitted to this facility and are rendered services without distinction due to race, color, national origin, handicapping condition or age.