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Wisconsin Distance Education Conference 2010 open access publishing seminar
 

Wisconsin Distance Education Conference 2010 open access publishing seminar

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These are slides used by 4 authors of books released as Open Access by Athabasca University Press. The presentation also compares impact of open versus proprietary publication of scholarly work.

These are slides used by 4 authors of books released as Open Access by Athabasca University Press. The presentation also compares impact of open versus proprietary publication of scholarly work.

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  • Gmuati: You are free to repost this slideshow, assuming you keep attribution! Good luck
    Terry
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  • I would like to post this on our website as a resource for viewers wanting information on accessibility and distance education.
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  • Hi Terry, Could you send me the PPT file? Slides 79 and 80 are wonderful and I would like to use them... :-) Thanks! Olaf
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  • 08/05/10 13:55 © 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.
  • 08/05/10 13:55 © 2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. Microsoft, Windows, Windows Vista and other product names are or may be registered trademarks and/or trademarks in the U.S. and/or other countries. The information herein is for informational purposes only and represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation as of the date of this presentation. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information provided after the date of this presentation. MICROSOFT MAKES NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, AS TO THE INFORMATION IN THIS PRESENTATION.
  • These are just some. They may not be representative, but they are some that have worked for me.
  • This picture was taken in 1963 at a showing of "Saint George and the Dragon" in Paris. Just as the dragon is slain, some children cry out in a combination of horror and delight, while others are taken aback in shock. Every child is consumed with emotion. The experience is captivating, memorable, and lasting. Now let’s compare this to our educational systems.
  • too much research that deals with perceptions, perspectives, experiences of learners in small cases with little obvious relevance beyond the case- heavily interpretivist in orientation - qualitative methods more needed on organizational issues, policy issues, change management, innovationn- research hasn't adequately addressed emergence of new technologies and impact on design of DE,  i.e, the PLN, edupunk etc- lack of historical perspective - a lot of what people think is new is not: edupunk = self directed learning; online learning is often not considered as part of DE (see Garrison's article in JDE); e-learning is treated as something new and different serious problem: can't think of a single research article that has influence my practice in the last 10 yrs- partly due to ed research being part of the university model of research - not required to be practical, funding doesn't require it.- need funding that is tied to practical outputs- need research that focuses on applied learning contexts- research needs to be part of practice. Currently they are separate activities

Wisconsin Distance Education Conference 2010 open access publishing seminar Wisconsin Distance Education Conference 2010 open access publishing seminar Presentation Transcript

  • Open Access Publishing Workshop 26th Annual Conference on Distance Teaching & Learning University of Wisconsin Terry Anderson, Dietmar Kennepohl, Mohamed Ally George Veletsiano     
    • Open Access Publishing Overview
    • Research Results on DE publishing – work from Olaf Zawacki-Richter
    • AU Press
    • Overview of 3 books in Emerging Technologies Series plus Accessible Elements
    • Hot Issues – All
    • Free Books for All!!
    Symposium Overview
  • Athabasca University, Alberta, Canada * Athabasca University
    • Fastest growing university in Canada
    • 34,000 students, 700 courses
    • 100% distance education
    • Graduate and Undergraduate programs
    • Master & Doctorate – in Distance Education
      • Only USA Regionally Accredited University in Canada
    *Athabasca University
  •  
  • AU Press operates on the model of a knowledge-based economy, to which we contribute by providing peer-reviewed publications unfettered by the desire to commodify thought or to restrict access to ideas.
  • About AU Press
    • 1. Athabasca University is an open university - mandate is to lower barriers to knowledge
    • - believes that it is a university’s obligation to provide for the dissemination of research
    • AU Press is the first fully open access press in Canada
    • Open access = online publications to be read for free
    • - barriers to accessibility have been decreased (user-friendly website, smaller file sizes, etc.)
    • 4. AU Press publishes OA books (supplemented by author videos), journals, and websites
  • What Drives OA Publishing at AU Press
    • the desire to increase the dissemination of knowledge beyond the print and sales capabilities of printed books (number of hits is more important than sales figures)
    • the wish to avoid the commodification, privatization, and corporate control of knowledge
    • the belief that the public has the right to access publicly funded research
  • What and How We Publish
    • Everything we publish goes through a minimum of two rounds of peer review!
    • Not an “either/or” approach - open access PDFs exist alongside revenue-generating print and digital publications (Universal PDFs and epub files)
    • Areas of specialization - distance education, Western Canadian history, women’s studies, Aboriginal studies, and labour history
    • Publications
    • - 40 books, 7 journals, 2 websites, and numerous author interviews
    • Books – print and electronic
    • Journals – one print/e-journal, 6 other e-journals
    • Websites – two scholarly websites
    • Author Interviews – videos in which authors discuss their work, offered as adjuncts to our books
  • Author Response
    • Author response to OA monograph publishing
    • Negative - concern with royalties
    • - copyright issues (what happens to their work once online) Positive - as research is increasingly carried out online, OA publishing increases the chances that an author’s work will be found
    • - increased citations: authors like to know they’re being read
    • - SSHRC supports open access
    • - online “hits” can assist in job promotion
  • OA Publishing and E-Books
    • Open access does not mean “bells and whistles” e- publishing - AU Press mandate requires only open access
    • - files for download are in standard PDF format (same files used to print the book)
    • - value-added e-publishing (XML, epub, etc.) is used as a source of revenue
    • 2. Is selling OA e-books an oxymoron? - we use e-aggregators to sell e-books (Universal PDFs) as well as other vendors to sell digital files (epub)
    • - initial results show that libraries are choosing to purchase our titles through aggregators Why? Aggregators make e-books available in searchable databases, which is seen as value added.
  • Open Access Funding Models
    • Author publications fees
    • Sponsorship or patron
    • Advertisements
    • Derivative/Associated product sales
    • Government or association
  • AU Press Funding/Business Model
    • Funding - university support (1% solution)
    • - print and e-book sales
    • - government grants
    • - author-generated support (e.g., funding from author’s department) and other external funding
    • Key strategies - low print inventory (keep inventory as close to POD as we can)
    • - e-publishing is not “cutting edge” but driven by OA mandate
    • Results - as a new press with little backlist, we are pleased with the robust print sales we have achieved to date.
  • OA Books: Hits and Sales
    • Critical Questions
    • How many hits are our OA PDFs getting?
    • What are the sales of printed books?
    • Does one affect the other?
  • Open Access PDFs and Print Sales
    • Imagining Head-Smashed-In
    • Lost Tracks
    • Northern Rover
    • Icon, Brand, Myth
    • The Importance of Being Monogamous
    • Theory and Practice of Online Learning
    • Before and After Radical Prostate Surgery
    • Poems for a Small Park
    • Mobile Learning
    • Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance
    • Bomb Canada (after 6 months)
    • The Beaver Hills Country (after 6 months)
    17467
  • Scholarly Monograph Liberalism, Surveillance, and Resistance: Indigenous Communities in Western Canada, 1877 – 1927 by Keith D. Smith
    • May 2009 – April 2010
    • Downloads – 1,684
    • Print Sales – 242
    • Ratio – 6.96 : 1
    • Avg. downloads – 140/month
  • Scholarly Textbook The Theory and Practice of Online Learning (second edition) Edited by Terry Anderson
    • June 2008 – May 2009
    • Downloads – 21,888
    • Print Sales – 267
    • Ratio – 81.98 : 1
    • Avg. downloads – 1,824/month
    • Unusually high download/sales ratio, possibly due to the subject area and hits on individual essays.
  • General Observations
    • Even when the entire text of a book can be downloaded for free, the printed book continues to sell.
    • Our statistics cannot answer two critical questions: - what would the( sales of the printed book have been in the absence of OA PDFs? - how many people were prompted to purchase (or not to purchase) the book because they had previously viewed it online?
    • To draw general conclusions would require sales data for equivalent print-only books published by closely similar presses.
    • Books do not equal mass-produced objects: each book is a law unto itself.
    • The Creative Commons Solutions
    • Copyright retained by author and/or publisher
    • Some rights reserved:
      • Attribution
      • No Derivatives
      • Non commercial
      • Share alike
    How are Open Access Books Licensed?
    • Nature of all universities and especially open university to freely share knowledge
    • Education is key to stewardship of our planet
    • Gift culture works for long term cultural sustainability
    • Reduces debate over value of personal ownership
    • Increases distribution, readers and impact
    Why Open Access?
  •  
    • DOJ – 5246 Journals, 2,186 full text at DOJ, 430,000 articles
    Scholarly Journal Publication in Distance Education
    • What are most popular Topics in DE Journals
    • What methodologies most used?
    • Where are the authors from and gender?
    • Are Open Access articles cited more than proprietary ones?
    • Zawacki-Richter, O. (2009). Research Areas in Distance Education: A Delphi Study The International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 10(3).
    • Zawacki-Richter,O., Baecker, E., & Vogt, S. (2009). Review of distance education research (2000 to 2008) – analysis of research areas, methods and authorship patterns. International Review of Research on Distance And Open Learning 10(6).
    • Zawacki-Richter, O., Anderson, T., & Tuncay, N. (2010). The growing impact of open access distance education journals - a bibliometric analysis. Journal of Distance Education, 24(1)
  • What is being published?
  • What Methods Are Used? Review of Distance Education Research (2000 to 2008): Analysis of Research Areas, Methods, and Authorship Patterns. IRRODL (2009) Olaf Zawacki-Richter, Eva Maria Bäcker, and Sebastian Vogt
    • In 2006 there were over 23,000 scholarly journals, publishing 1.4 million articles a year, and creating a $5 billion industry that employs approximately 90,000 persons (Ware, 2006).
    • Very disruptive! See Anderson, T., & McConkey, B. (2009). Development of Disruptive Open Access Journals. The Canadian Journal of Higher Education, 39(3), 71-87.
    Open Versus Closed
  • OA versus Closed Differences in Disciplines Norris, M., Oppenheim, C., & Rowland, F. (2008). The citation advantage of open-access articles. J ournal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 59(12), 1963-1972.
    • 12 distance education journals (6 open and 6 published in closed format by commercial publishers).
    • online survey completed by members of the editorial boards of these 12 journals and
    • a systematic review of the number of citations per article (N=1,123) and per journal issue between 2003 and 2008,
    Zawacki-Richter, O., Anderson, T., & Tuncay, N. (2010). The growing impact of open access distance education journals - a bibliometric analysis. Journal of Distance Education, 24(1)
  •  
    • Useful? For assessing contribution and maximizing impact
    • Formal systems:
      • Thompson ISI – commercial, owned by publishers, biased?
      • Scopius – commercial, owned by publishers
      • Google Scholar – uneven coverage and ‘secret” means of assessment
    • No significant differences in impact factors
      • Google Scholar -based metrics showed strong correlations with the traditional JIF. As such, they provide academics and universities committed to JIFs with a good alternative for journals that are not ISI-indexed.”
        • Harzing,& van der Wai (2008)
    • Combining metrics with perception data of ‘experts’
    Rating Journals
  •  
    • Scholarometer (Firefox plugin)
    • Publish or Perish: www.harzing.com/
    Google Scholar tools for Impact and citation ratings
  • Citation Results The Growing Impact of Open Access Distance Education Journals: A Bibliometric Analysis/index.php/jde/article/view/661/ 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
  • H-index 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008
  •  
  • Quality Ratings By Editorial Board Members No Significant difference between open and closed journals
  • Exposure ratings by Board Members No Significant difference between open and closed journals
    • Most popular topics are interaction, instructional design and student characteristics
    • Qualitative methods most popular, except American JDE
    • Rating journals is not an exact science
    • Group of 5 top journals
      • IRRODL, DE, AJDE, JDE, OL
    Research Conclusions
    • Most international of the DE journals
    • Sponsored by Athabasca University and hosted on Open Journal System
    • Publishes in Html, PDF, MP3 and ePub formats
    • Batch publication – usually 4 per year, including special issues
    • over 5000 subscribers
    • www.irrodl.org
    IRRODL
  • 26 th Annual Conference on Distance Teaching & Learning August 4-6, 2010 Madison Accessible Elements Dietmar Kennepohl and Lawton Shaw
  • Richard Feynman
  • “ We site what we see” Alma Swan American Scientist, Vol 95, May-June 2007
  • Citations Open-Access versus Closed-Access (Data from Hajjem, Harnad and Gingras 2005)
  • Cited Articles in arXiv Repository (Swan 2007)
  • What drives open access publishing at AU Press?
    • the desire to increase the dissemination of knowledge beyond the print and sales capabilities of printed books (number of hits is more important than sales figures)
    • the wish to avoid the commodification, privatization, and corporate control of knowledge
    • the belief that the public has the right to access publicly funded research
  • Accessible Elements A Quick Tour
    • Learning
    • Laboratories
    • Logistics
  • Table of Contents Foreword IX   Introduction XV   Learning   Chapter One 1   Interactions Affording Distance Science Education Terry Anderson   Chapter Two 19   Learning Science at a Distance: Instructional Dialogues and Resources Paul Gorsky and Avner Caspi  
  • Table of Contents Chapter Three 37   Leadership Strategies for Coordinating Distance Education Instructional Development Teams Gale Parchoma   Chapter Four 61   Toward New Models of Flexible Education to Enhance Quality in Australian Higher Education Stuart Palmer, Dale Holt, and Alan Farley  
  • Table of Contents Laboratories   Chapter Five 83   Taking the Chemistry Experience Home — Home Experiments or “Kitchen Chemistry” Robert Lyall and Antonio (Tony) F. Patti   Chapter Six 109   Acquisition of Laboratory Skills by On-Campus and Distance Education Students Jenny Mosse and Wendy Wright    
  • Table of Contents Chapter Seven 131   Low-Cost Physics Home Laboratory Farook Al-Shamali and Martin Connors   Chapter Eight 147   Laboratories in the Earth Sciences Edward Cloutis   Chapter Nine 167   Remote Control Teaching Laboratories and Practicals Dietmar Kennepohl  
  • Table of Contents Logistics   Chapter Ten 191   Needs, Costs, and Accessibility of de Science Lab Programs Lawton Shaw and Robert Carmichael   Chapter Eleven 213   Challenges and Opportunities for Teaching Laboratory Sciences at a Distance in a Developing Country Md. Tofazzal Islam  
  • Table of Contents Chapter Twelve 235   Distance and Flexible Learning at University of the South Pacific Anjeela Jokhan and Bibhya N. Sharma   Chapter Thirteen 247   Institutional Considerations: A Vision for Distance Education Erwin Boschmann   Author Biographies 267   Index 275  
  • Accessible Elements - Downloads Chapter/File Nov'09 Dec'09 Jan'10 Feb'10 Mar'10 Apr'10 May'10 00-Front Matter - 12 3 5 3 7 2 00-Table of Contents - 4 7 5 2 6 2 00-Foreword - 7 6 5 3 0 0 00-Introduction - 6 8 4 2 2 2 01-Chapter 1 - 7 13 7 11 10 3 02-Chapter 2 - 6 9 9 3 3 1 03-Chapter 3 - 4 4 9 3 11 2 04-Chapter 4 - 3 15 6 2 5 2 05-Chapter 5 - 12 51 47 44 35 17 06-Chapter 6 - 4 25 11 10 3 2 07-Chapter 7 - 21 60 41 41 37 22 08-Chapter 8 - 6 14 6 5 2 2 09-Chapter 9 - 4 23 20 33 7 9 10-Chapter 10 - 8 29 14 2 3 1 11-Chapter 11 - 10 22 20 18 22 18 12-Chapter 12 - 4 14 8 1 4 0 13-Chapter 13 - 3 8 6 9 7 1 99-Author Biographies - 12 10 16 7 4 1 99-Index - 5 9 8 0 2 0 99-About the Editors - 9 2 3 2 1 1 FULLBOOK - 29 136 58 32 47 38 Total Downloads: - 176 468 308 233 218 126
  • Accessible Elements Download Distribution Country/Territory Downloads % Canada 368 31.00% United States 218 18.37% Greece 78 6.57% China 54 4.55% India 43 3.62% Czech Republic 32 2.70% Australia 31 2.61% Malta 31 2.61% Portugal 28 2.36% United Kingdom 28 2.36% Russia 25 2.11% Uruguay 23 1.94% Germany 22 1.85% Bangladesh 21 1.77% Egypt 20 1.68% Spain 20 1.68% Japan 17 1.43% Mongolia 15 1.26% Brunei 12 1.01% Chile 10 0.84% Saudi Arabia 10 0.84% Israel 9 0.76% New Zealand 8 0.67% Turkey 8 0.67% Croatia 4 0.34%
  •  
  • Thank You
  • Open Access Publishing Mohamed Ally, Ph.D. Director and Professor Centre for Distance Education Athabasca University Canada [email_address]
  • Book Link
    • http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120155
  • Why Publish as Open Access
  • Why Publish as Open Access
    • Global exposure
    • More people will read the book or parts of the book
    • Reach people in remote locations
    • Cater for those who cannot afford to buy the printed book
    • Contribute to the education for all
    • Feels good
  • Mobile Friendly
    • Can read on a regular computer, smart phone, iPad, or other mobile devices
  • Process
    • Author prepared first draft
    • Editor review
    • Author revise
    • Editor conduct second review
    • Copy editing
    • Final review by authors
    • Format E-book
    • Arrange for printing
  • Content of Book
    • Front Matter
    • Table Of Contents
    • Foreword
    • Contributing Authors
    • Introduction
    • Ally, M. (2009). Mobile learning: Transforming the delivery of education and training.
  • Content of Book (cont’d)
    • PART ONE: Advances in Mobile Learning
    • Chapter 1: Current State of Mobile Learning John Traxler
    • University of Wolverhampton, United Kingdom
    • Chapter 2: A Model for Framing Mobile Learning
    • Marguerite L. Koole
    • Athabasca University, Canada
  • Content of Book (cont’d)
    • PART TWO: Research on Mobile Learning
    • Chapter 3: Mobile Distance Learning with PDAs: Development and Testing of Pedagogical and System Solutions Supporting Mobile Distance Learners
    • Torstein Rekkedal and Aleksander Dye
    • NKI Distance Education, Norway
    • Chapter 4: Using Mobile Learning to Enhance the Quality of Nursing Practice Education
    • Richard F. Kenny, Caroline Park
    • Athabasca University, Canada
    • Jocelyne M. C. Van Neste-Kenny, Pamela A. Burton, and Jan Meiers
    • North Island College, British Columbia, Canada.
  • Content of Book (cont’d)
    • Chapter 5: Informal Learning Evidence in Online Communities of Mobile Device Enthusiasts
    • Gill Clough, Ann C. Jones, Patrick McAndrew, and Eileen Scanlon
    • The Open University of United Kingdom, UK
    • Chapter 6: M-learning: Positioning Educators for a Mobile, Connected Future Kristine Peters
    • Flinders University, Australia
  • Content of Book (cont’d)
    • PART THREE: Applications of Mobile Learning
    • Chapter 7: Practitioners as Innovators: Emergent Practice in Personal Mobile Teaching, Learning, Work, and Leisure
    • Agnes Kukulska-Hulme and John Pettit
    • The Open University of United Kingdom, UK
    • Chapter 8: Design and Development of Multimedia Learning Objects for Mobile Phones Claire Bradley, Richard Haynes, John Cook, Tom Boyle, and Carl Smith
    • London Metropolitan University, United Kingdom
    • Chapter 9: From E-learning to Mobile Learning: New Opportunities
    • Michelle Pieri and Davide Diamantini
    • University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy
  • Content of Book (cont’d)
    • Chapter 10: MobilED – Mobile Tools and Services Platform for Formal and Informal Learning
    • Merryl Ford
    • Meraka Institute of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), South Africa
    • Teemu Leinonen
    • University of Art and Design, Helsinki, Finland
    • Chapter 11: Exploring the Challenges and Opportunities of M-learning within an International Distance Education Programme
    • Jon Gregson
    • Imperial College London, United Kingdom
    • Dolf Jordaan
    • University of Pretoria, South Africa
  • Content of Book (cont’d)
    • Chapter 12: Using Mobile Technologies for Multimedia Tours in a Traditional Museum Setting
    • Laura Naismith
    • McGill University, Montreal, Canada
    • M. Paul Smith
    • University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
    • Chapter 13: Use of Mobile Technology for Teacher Training
    • Jocelyn Wishart
    • University of Bristol, United Kingdom
  • Content of Book (cont’d)
    • Conclusion
    • Glossary
    • Index
    • Ally, M. (2009). Mobile learning: Transforming the delivery of education and training.
  • Location of Chapter Authors
    • Australia
    • Canada
    • Finland
    • Italy
    • Norway
    • South Africa
    • United Kingdom
  • Downloading Chapters and the Book
    • Ally, M. (2009). Mobile learning: Transforming the delivery of education and training.
  • Book Download Statistics
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • Emerging Technologies in Distance Education George Veletsianos, PhD Instructional Technology University of Texas at Austin
  • Research & Teaching Interests Design & Development of Online Learning Environments Adventure Learning Pedagogical Agents Learning Experience Social, Problem-based, Emerging, Engagement
  • Think of this…
  • … and not this.
  • July 2008: RFP September 2008 – More than 60 proposals December 2008 – Full chapters April 2009 – Reviews & Resubmissions May - Summer 2009 – Peer review, revisions Fall 2009 – Revisions & Edits Fall 2009 – Spring 2010: Copyedits, Proofs, Some more edits July 2010 – Publication
    • What do we mean by “emerging” ?
    • “ Constructivism” ?
    • Web-based education?
    • Self-organizing systems?
    • May or may not be new technologies,
    • can be described as evolving organisms that exist in a state of “coming into being”
    • experience hype cycles
    • satisfy the “not yet” criteria of
      • not yet being fully understood, and
      • not yet being fully research or research in a mature way
    • are potentially disruptive, but their potential is mostly unfulfilled.
    • Contents:
    • Emerging Technologies
    • Personal Learning Environments
    • Social Networking Sites in Distance Ed
    • Responsive LMS
    • Web Analytics
    • Emerging Practices
    • Connectivism
    • Roles of the Instructor, learner, Institution
    • Personal Learning Networks
    • Adventure Learning
  • Why Open Access in a world new to Open Access?
  • Goal #1: More citations Goal #2 : To improve distance education How?
  • By reaching more people.
  • Early Experiences (published 2 weeks ago)
  • Social Media mentions
  • Tracking you…
  • Greater access – wider dissemination
  • Use and Adaptation
  • Use and Adaptation
  • Open Access :: Widely Available :: Greater Impact
  • Emerging Technologies in Distance Education George Veletsianos, PhD www.veletsianos.com [email_address] University of Texas at Austin
    • First edition 2004
    • 450 copies printed – all sold at $50 copy
    • Stopped counting at 75,000 downloads
    • Chapters translated into 3 languages
    • Each section combines practice and
    • theory, giving practical scholarship
    Theory and Practice of Online Learning Edited by Terry Anderson and Fathi Elloumi
  • A Tale of 3 books Open Access - First Year 26,000 + downloads & Individual chapters 404 hardcopies sold @ $40 Commercial publisher 934 copies sold at $52.00 Buy at Amazon!! E-Learning for the 21 st Century Commercial Pub. 1200 sold @ $135.00 2,000 copies in Arabic Translation @ $8.
    • Published 2008
    • Winner of 2009 Wedemeyer award for Distance Education publication of the year
    • Every chapter updated, 4 new chapters
    • Available AU Press and Amazon – Buy now!!
    Theory and Practice – 2 nd Ed Edited by Terry Anderson
    • Part 1 Role and Function of Theory
    • Part 2 Infrastructure and Support of Course Development
    • Part 3 Design and development of courses
    • Part 4 Delivery, Quality and Student Support
    A Tour of the 2 nd Edition
    • Educational Theory- Mohamed Ally- from behaviorism to Connectivism
    • A Theory of Online learning – Terry Anderson
    • Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition – Diane Conrad
    • Learning and Teaching Philosophies - Heather Kanuka
    Part 1 Role and Function of Theory
    • Infrastructure for Online learning – Alan Davis
    • Technologies of Online Learning – Rory McGreal
    • Characteristics of Online Learning Media – Pat Faye
    • Mobile Learning – Maureen Hutchinson
    • Social Software – Terry Anderson
    Part 2 Infrastructure and Support of Course Development
    • Development of online Courses – Dean Caplan
    • The Editor in design and Development – Jan Thiessen
    • Financial Decisions about Technology in Education – David Annand
    • The Quality Dilemma – Nancy Parker
    Part 3 Design and development of courses
    • Teaching in Online Delivery – Terry Anderson
    • Call Centres in Online Learning – Alex Kondra
    • Library Support for E-Learning – Kay Johnson
    • Supporting the On line Learning – Susan Moisey
    • Developing team Skills online- Deborah Hurst
    Part 4 Delivery, Quality and Student Support
    • Prior Publication – blogs, proceedings??
    • Peer review for books and articles
    • Interactions
      • Open reviewing
      • Generating Comments,
      • Debates/rebuttals
    • Revenue models
    • Multi-media use
    • Creative Commons Licensing options
    • How to recruit good papers and volunteers
    Hot Issues
    • Too much small case interpretivist research?
    • Gaps
      • Organizational issues
      • Policy issues
      • Change management
      • Innovation
      • Emergence of new technologies and impact on DE design
      • Ahistoricity?
    • Research - Practice connection
      • Do we need a more practical focus?
    Hot Issues