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Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009
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Beyond LMS Keynote to Canada Moodlemoot 2009

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A familiar overview of groups networks and collectives with ideas for the role of LMS in this mix and implications for lifelong learning beyond the course.

A familiar overview of groups networks and collectives with ideas for the role of LMS in this mix and implications for lifelong learning beyond the course.

Published in: Education
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Notes
  • More recent work on harvesting (and now we talk more about harvesting feedback than grades) can be found in places we are blogging. Here is an anchor piece done for AAC&U in Jan 2009 http://wsuctlt.wordpress.com/2009/01/20/harvesting_gradebook/ and here are some thoughts about harvesting feedback on assignments, not just student work: http://communitylearning.wordpress.com/2009/04/28/gathering-feedback-to-improve-course-design/ and here are some thoughts about how harvesting feedback looks in the wild: http://communitylearning.wordpress.com/2009/04/24/harvesting-gradebook-in-the-wild/
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  • Glad to hear someone with as much on the go as you is reading this Scott!!.
    here is the full refernce:
    Brown, G., & Peterson, N. (2008). The LMS Mirror: School as We Know IT versus School as We Need IT and the Triumph of the Custodial Class
    . Journal of Online Learning and Teaching, 4(2) Retrieved July 2008 from http://jolt.merlot.org/vol4no2/brown0608.htm
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  • Terry, near the end you make mention to a work by 'Brown & Petersen' that talks about the idea of a 'harvesting gradebook.' Am really interested in the full reference as it is an idea I've been talking about for a few years and so am interested to read someone else's take on it.

    (And to answer my own question - here it is http://jolt.merlot.org/vol4no2/brown0608.pdf)
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  • 1. BEYOND LEARNING MANAGEMENT TO OPEN LEARNING SUPPORT AND INSPIRATION, Terry Anderson, Ph.D. Canada Research Chair in Distance Education
  • 2. Overview • Energy drivers for change: – Social constructivism and peer production – Individual and group Choice & Cooperative Freedom – Group, Network and collective learning opportunities Technological Affordances of Distributed web services • Design Characteristics of Next Gen Systems
  • 3. Values • We can (and must) continuously improve the quality, effectiveness, appeal, cost and time efficiency of the learning experience. • Student control and freedom is integral to 21st Century life-long education and learning. • Education for elites is not sufficient for planetary survival
  • 4. 21st century learner • Wants to learn things • Continuously moves between on and offline • Is learning to recognize and demand quality when investing in learning • Knows there are many paths to learning and is used to staggering amounts of content • Normally uses a wide set of information processing, creation and communications tools “The decline of the compliant learner’. P. Goodyear 2004
  • 5. Steven Warburton, 2007 5
  • 6. Pedagogical Control Transactional Control Negotiated Teacher Control Control Autonomy Content, lecture Dialogue Self directed assessment, Discussion, learning wikis Dron, 2006
  • 7. Tony Karrer 2008
  • 8. Openness challenge of Educational in the21st Century • Making the Formal Informal – Making the Informal Formal (Martin Weller, OUUK)
  • 9. The Theory of Cooperative Freedom (Morten Paulsen) • Affords Freedom to all learning participants • Voluntary, but compelling participation • Means promoting individual flexibility • Means promoting affinity to learning groups and networks Paulsen, 2008
  • 10. Choosing the right for the right amount of openness? 10 http://www.go2web20.net 2795 logos as of February 05, 2009
  • 11. Taxonomy of the ‘Many’ Dron and Anderson, 2007 Group Conscious membership Leadership and organization Cohorts and paced Rules and guidelines Metaphor : Access and privacy controls Virtual classroom Focused and often time limited May be blended F2F 11
  • 12. Formal Learning and Groups • Long history of research and study • Established sets of tools – Classrooms, – Learning Management Systems – Synchronous (video & net conferencing) – Email • Need to develop face to face, mediated and blended group learning skills
  • 13. Groups as Communities of Practice • Wengler’s ideas of Community of Practice – mutual engagement – synchronous and notification tools – joint enterprise – collaborative projects, “pass the course” – a shared repertoire – common tools, LMS, IM and doc sharing
  • 14. LMS and Distributed web 2.0 Group Tools
  • 15. Problems with Groups • Restrictions in time, space, pace, &relationship - NOT OPEN • Often overly confined by teacher expectation and institutional curriculum control • Usually Isolated from the authentic world of practice • “low tolerance of internal difference, sexist and ethicized regulation, high Relationships demand for obedience to its norms and exclusionary practices.” Cousin &Deepwell 2005 Paulsen (1993) • Group think (Baron, 2005) Law of Cooperative Freedom • Poor preparation for Lifelong Learning beyond the course
  • 16. • Groups are necessary, but not sufficient for quality learning.
  • 17. Network Shared interest/practice Fluid membership Friends of friends Group Reputation and altruism driven Emergent norms, structures Activity ebbs and flows Rarely F2F Metaphor: Virtual Community of Practice 17
  • 18. • Collaborative Learning In Groups • Cooperative Learning in Networks (Paulsen, 2008)
  • 19. Networks Add diversity to learning “People who live in the intersection of social worlds are at higher risk of having good ideas” Burt, 2005, p. 90
  • 20. Networks Communities of Practice • Distributed • Share common interest • Self organizing • Open • No expectation of meeting or even knowing all members of the Network • Little expectation of reciprocity • Contribute for social capital, altruism and a sense of improving the world/practice through contribution (Brown and Duguid, 2001)
  • 21. Creating Incentives to Sustain Contribution to Networks The New Yorker September 12, 2005
  • 22. Alec CourosVoiceThreadhttp://voicethread.com/#q.b67978.i350123
  • 23. quot;the network contains within it antagonistic clusterings, divergent sub- topologies, rogue nodesquot; Galloway and Thacker, 2007 p. 34 “There is crack in everything, that's how the light gets in” Leonard Cohen Image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/eeblet/423397690/
  • 24. Network Pedagogies • Connectivism – Learning is network formation: adding new nodes, creating new paths between people and learning resources – “Learning can reside outside of ourselves (within an organization or a database), is focused on connecting specialized information sets, and the connections that enable us to learn are more important than our current state of knowing.” Siemens, G. (2007) • Partcipatory Pedagogy- Students as content-co- creators • Complexity – Learning in environments in which activities and outcomes emerge in response to authentic need creates powerful learning opportunities – Learning at the edge of chaos – Complicity: An International Journal of Complexity and Education See the Networked Student by Wendy Drexler 24
  • 25. Network Tool Set (example) Text Text 25 Stepanyan, Mather & Payne, 2007
  • 26. Access Controls in Elgg
  • 27. Network Group Collective ‘Aggregated other’ Unconscious ‘wisdom of crowds’ Stigmergic aggregation Algorithmic rules Augmentation and annotation More used, more useful Metaphor: Data Mining Wisdom of Crowds Never F2F 27
  • 28. 3. Formal Education and Collectives “a kind of cyber-organism, formed from people linked algorithmically…it grows through the aggregation of Individual, Group and Networked activities” Dron& Anderson, 2007 • Collectives used to aggregate, then filter, compare, contrast and recommend. • Personal and collaborative search and filter for learning • Smart retrieval from the universal library of resources – human and learning objects • Allows discovery and validation of norms, values, opinion and “ways of understanding” 28
  • 29. Collective Tools 29
  • 30. Collectives, Privacy & Identity • Best way to protect personal integrity is by creating a robust but realistic web presence. • Your actions are being mined, best to be a miner rather than a lump of coal! • Active social net users are more socially active and integrated than non users (Ellison, Steinfield, & Lampe, 2007) • Use of Blogs reduces feelings of alienation and isolation among online learners (Dickey, 2004) • When perceived interest and benefits increase, willingness to provide personal data increases (Dinev& Hart, 2006)
  • 31. Collectives, Communications and Privacy • The end of privacy as currently conceived • Development of the affordances of Web for “privacy protected” control. • Privacy-Enhancing Technologies (PETs) tools to control access or unauthorized release/sharing of data • “PETsPlus – tools to transform otherwise privacy-invasive technologies into privacy-protective ones, with little or no loss of functionality”. See Searchlight Ontario Privacy Commissioner Ann CavoukianCBC Search Engine Podcast – Jessie Brown • Creating a positive (non zero-sum) return such individuals will participate in data exchange ofprivate information for knowledge gains without loss of privacy control. • Users must be knowledgeable to make effective and non exploitive trades
  • 32. Taxonomy of the Many Network Group Collective Dron and Anderson, 2007 32
  • 33. Net Technologies Web 2.0 Tools LMS Network Group Collective Dron and Anderson, 2007 Semantic Web Tools 33
  • 34. Types of Teaching Different teachers – different tools 1 Teachers who teach curriculum want: 1 Attendance and participation monitoring 2 Quizzes and gradebooks 3 Content management and distribution of teacher created and filtered resources 2 Teachers who teach learning want: 1 Tools for individual and collaborative construction 2 Tools for reflection, self and group assessment 3 Content management (tags, spaces, organizational views) of teacher, student created and web resources 4 Spaces for exploration and discovery 5 Networks for developing learning skill and social capital 6 Aggregators for assessing net-wide student artifact construction 3 Teachers who want it all!
  • 35. Tools Create Behaviours and Attitudes • “The confluence of constrained mental models of teaching and learning, plus forces that privilege problem-minimizing strategies over the messy engagement of deeper teaching and learning have trumped, for now, the potential of the building’s innovative, collaborative spaces.” Brown & Peterson, 2008
  • 36. Critique of LMS • LMSs concentrate on the course context. • All resources are loaded and linked within the overall structure of a course. • LMSs have an inherent asymmetric relationship between instructor and learner in terms of control of the learning experience. • The learner’s role is one of passive acceptance of content and limited permissions set by the LMS. • Nearly all learner experience is designed to engage content in exactly the same way.
  • 37. We publicly assert that all users of the social web are entitled to certain fundamental rights, specifically: * Ownership of their own personal information,: their own profile data the list of people they are connected to the activity stream of content they create; •Control of whether and how such personal information is shared with others; and * Freedom to grant persistent access to their personal information to trusted external sites. A Bill of Rights for Users of the Social Web Authored by Joseph Smarr, Marc Canter, Robert Scoble, and Michael Arrington
  • 38. Why destroy artifacts of student learning? • If people are continuously working in a walled garden like Moodle, they are going to have to make separate copies of the work if they consider it worth keeping. Dave Cormier • “In order to protect my own digital identity, sometimes I have to filter content that I share publicly. “ Sharon Peters
  • 39. Design Characteristics of Next Gen Systems • Learning is Integrated into Real Life • IP and Persistence – Student ownership and control • Expanded tools for negotiation – Real time communication– audio, video and immersive – Voting, polling, presence indicators • Expanded tools for artifact production, storage and retrieval • Connections beyond the courses, programs, peers and institutions • Increased transparency and Control • Parcellation and Scale, Adaptability, Stigmergy (Dron 2007)
  • 40. Engagement in Formal Education • A social component – Meeting and engaging new friends – Discovering new social interests • A Cognitive component – Being challenged – Being exposed to how much you don’t know – Observing others with incredible interests and skills • An institutional component – Efficient and effective policies – An organization that cares about your more than your tuition.
  • 41. Presence Pedagogy- Steve Bronach “Presence is the sense of being in the immediate vicinity of others.”
  • 42. Presence Pedagogy- Bronach et al (2008) • Creating an environment that effectively capitalizes on the presence of others requires – Thematic design of space – Promotion of presence – Build help seeking and giving capacity – Rich tools and support for collaborative work – Stimulating emergent communities or practice – Appropriate problems • Both Asynchronous and Synchronous forms of presence
  • 43. From AEtZone Appalachion State University • Active Worlds based, 7 years continuous use • closed virtual community • “As of April 25, 2007, AET Zone is a patent- pending application. A patent entitled quot;Virtual Education System and Method of Instructionquot; (application serial # US 11/739,866) was registered with the USPTO.
  • 44. Network and Collective Tools are Very Disruptive • Christensen (1997,2008) studies innovation and the impact of disruptions. • A disruptive technology “transforms a market whose services are complicated and expensive into one where simplicity, convenience, accessibility and affordability characterize that industry” p. 11
  • 45. Unless steered by very wise leaders organizations will: “shape every innovation into a sustaining innovation - one that fits processes, values, and the economic model of the organization - because organizations cannot naturally disrupt themselves” (Christiansen et al. p. 74 From Leigh Blackwell’s LMS Comic at http://flickr.com/photos/leighblackall/sets/1733041/
  • 46. Is the Personal Learning Environment a threat or a promise for education? • A PLE is a user constructured web interface into the owners’ digital environment. – Content management integrating personal and professional interests (both formal and informal learning), – A profiling system for making connections – A collaborative and individual workspace – A multi formatted communications system – All connected via a series of syndicated and distributed feeds to each other and selected others.
  • 47. quot;The PLE is an approach not an application.quot; Stephen Downes • An approach that: – Values and builds upon learner input – Protects and celebrates identity – Respects academic ownership – Is Net-centric – Supports multiple levels of socializing, administration and learning – Supports communities of inquiry across and within disciplines, programs, institutions and individual learning contexts
  • 48. What is your PLE? Sue Perth, Western Australia, AU 2008 survey of 196 web 2.0 types
  • 49. Scott Leslie’s PLE Diagramm See others at Scott’s Wiki at http://edtechpost.wikispaces.com/PLE+Diagrams
  • 50. Scott Wilson's PLE and the Institution image
  • 51. Why service-orientation could make e-learning standards obsolete? Vossen&Westerkamp, 2008
  • 52. Professional, Produsage, Email Hobby, Personal networks News Identity I PLE Production Formal Tools Education Provider(s) Personal Hosting: Social Networks Collections Blogs, E- Photos portfolios, Presentatio Books ns, Profile Bookmarks Tags Resources
  • 53. Stages of PLE adoption • imagination (we become aware of the technology) • appropriation (we identify ways it could be of use to us) • objectification (we personalize the technology and its uses) • incorporation (we make the technology part of our lives) • conversion (we become identified with our use of the technology) Ling 2004
  • 54. Connectivist Education • Goal of education is to create connections among and between learners, resources, ideas and knowledge. • How can we do this within contexts that are closed to the outside world?
  • 55. • Formal learning as a transition to lifelong learning using and building networks • Training wheels for open communication: – Compulsion – Feedback and evaluation – Practice at critical reflection – First steps at creation of an academic and professional online presence
  • 56. • As technologies on the Internet grow increasingly sophisticated and open, the ability for Information Technology departments to integrate these new technologies decreases.Michael Farmer, 2009
  • 57. • “Every technology application hosted by an institution or available on the web can be a technical and bureaucratic obstacle course, or it can be a launch pad into the learning imagination.” • Envisions a “harvesting gradebook” aggregating contribution, multi media, automated - as killer app of educational future (Brown & Petersen, 2008)
  • 58. Innovator Open Courses Sustainable Future? • Siemens and Downes (2008) ~2000 enrolled 19 paid fees. • AlecCouros: Open Connected Grad course • David Wiley 4th version, University of Utah • Subscribe NOW (free) www.irrodl.org for special issue on Open Educational resources edited by Wiley fall 2009.
  • 59. The promise of open, yet credited courses – Is it real?? • Cormac Lawler on WikiUniversity: – Giving people access to spaces in which they can share, discuss, and question their knowledge – Developing open peer review models around this knowledge – Improving awareness about how knowledge is constructed – Framing and critiquing knowledge in a learning context (and giving people access to this open learning context) – Developing peer review models around these learning contexts – Improving awareness about how learning works • http://cormaggio.org/?p=26Cormac Lawler, 2008 • What about accreditation?? • WikiEducator moving from Commonwealth of Learning to Athabasca http://wikieducator.org/
  • 60. Operational proximity • We believe that these key concepts – participation; – emergence; – operational proximity; and – responsiveness—increase the possibility that learning, from diverse professional and organizational perspectives, can actively contribute to the evolution of distance education teams and their CMSs. Whitworth and Benson (in press –emerging issues
  • 61. Web Tool Affordances Content Presence Communi- Reflection Collabor- Discovery cation ation Blogs Social Tagging VoiceThread Wiki Web Conference -Elluminate Moodle From Siemens and Tittenberger, 2009
  • 62. Conclusion • Learners and society needs new types of education and learning opportunities that exploit groups, networks and collectives • This requires new types of learning technology that are controlled by individual learners • The adoption of these disruptive technologies is worth the gain!
  • 63. • “The pessimist complains about the wind, the optimist expects it to change, the realist adjusts the sails.” William Arthur Ward (1921 – 1994)
  • 64. quot;He who asks a question is a fool for five minutes; he who does not ask a question remains a fool forever.” Chinese Proverb Your comments and questions most welcomed! Terry Anderson terrya@athabascau.ca http://cde.athabascau.ca/faculty/terrya.php Blog: terrya.edublogs.org

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