World cultures plagiarism fall 2013

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  • 1. What is Plagiarism?
  • 2. Wait… What is Plagiarism? Plagiarism is using someone else’s words or ideas as your own without giving credit to that person. There are many ways to commit plagiarism. You could borrow a paper, copy large sections of text from a book, or fail to cite your sources.
  • 3. What if I didn’t mean to plagiarize? One very important point about plagiarism is that it's not always a mean, ugly, nasty act you MEANT to do. Sometimes you plagiarize without knowing it! We can say that plagiarism is either INTENTIONAL or UNINTENTIONAL. Regardless, PLAGIARISM IS A BIG DEAL!
  • 4. 3 Steps to avoid plagiarism: Step 1: Take good bulleted notes in your own words; no complete sentences. Step 2: Paraphrase your notes. Since your notes are in your own words, you are putting your notes back into complete sentences. Step 3: Cite your sources.
  • 5. Step 1: Note - Taking Read all the way through the material you are using for research. AS SOON AS you decide to use the information, write down the source information for your citations. Write down the important pieces of information in your own words. Use a “bullet” form – no complete sentences. This eliminates the danger of copying phrases from the original document.
  • 6. Step 2: Paraphrasing Paraphrasing is writing in your own words the essential information and ideas expressed by someone else. CREATIVITY
  • 7. An example of bulleted notes: In early 2011, a series of protests swept the Arab world, toppling longtime rulers in Egypt, Tunisia, and Libya and sparking a violent uprising against Syria’s dictator. An enormous wave of optimism spread across the region amid predictions that democracy might finally take root in the Middle East. It became known as the Arab Spring. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print. Bulleted Notes: • 2011, protests in Middle East • Rulers overthrown • Violent protests •  for democracy Violent protests to better the government of Middle Eastern countries In early 2011, a series of protests swept the Arab world, toppling longtime rulers in Egypt, Tunisia, and Libya and sparking a violent uprising against Syria’s dictator. An enormous wave of optimism spread across the region amid predictions that democracy might finally take root in the Middle East. It became known as the Arab Spring. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print.
  • 8. An example of bulleted notes: In early 2011, a series of protests swept the Arab world, toppling longtime rulers in Egypt, Tunisia, and Libya and sparking a violent uprising against Syria’s dictator. An enormous wave of optimism spread across the region amid predictions that democracy might finally take root in the Middle East. It became known as the Arab Spring. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print. Paraphrase:Bulleted Notes: • 2011, protests in Middle East • Ruler overthrown • Violent protests • Optimism •  for democracy • “Arab Spring” In 2011, an event began called the Arab Spring. Many violent protests arose in the Middle East. Existing rulers were overthrown in an attempt to bring democracy to the Arab world.
  • 9. An example of bulleted notes: Almost three years later, the giddy enthusiasm is long gone and the region is wracked by turmoil and bloodshed. In Libya, armed militias have filled the void left by the fall of strongman Muammar al- Qaddafi. In Syria, the uprising has morphed into a civil war that’s left more than 100,000 dead and provided a haven for Islamic extremists. In Tunisia, the moderate Islamist government that took power is increasingly fragile. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print. Bulleted Notes: • Years later Citizens  • Protests don’t = peace • Libya = militias • Syria war = 100,000 dead • Islamic extremists  Syria • Tunisia  weak gov’t Protests have not brought peace Almost three years later, the giddy enthusiasm is long gone and the region is wracked by turmoil and bloodshed. In Libya, armed militias have filled the void left by the fall of strongman Muammar al- Qaddafi. In Syria, the uprising has morphed into a civil war that’s left more than 100,000 dead and provided a haven for Islamic extremists. In Tunisia, the moderate Islamist government that took power is increasingly fragile. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print.
  • 10. An example of paraphrasing: Almost three years later, the giddy enthusiasm is long gone and the region is wracked by turmoil and bloodshed. In Libya, armed militias have filled the void left by the fall of strongman Muammar al-Qaddafi. In Syria, the uprising has morphed into a civil war that’s left more than 100,000 dead and provided a haven for Islamic extremists. In Tunisia, the moderate Islamist government that took power is increasingly fragile. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print. Paraphrase: Bulleted Notes: • Years later Citizens  • Protests don’t = peace • Libya = militias • Syria war = 100,000 dead • Islamic extremists  Syria • Tunisia  weak gov’t Middle eastern countries did not achieve the peace they sought through the protests. Libya, Syria and Tunisia all continued to be plagued with violence and death.
  • 11. Now, you try: • Read the 3rd and 4th paragraphs • Take 4 bulleted notes for each paragraph (8 total) • We will take 4 minutes to do this.
  • 12. Bulleted notes: Bulleted Notes: • Egyptian gov’t. unstable • Egypt = US ally • Military overthrew Mohamed Morsi • Gov’t. killed MM supporters Egypt became very unstable after protests But nowhere have dashed hopes been more jarring than in Egypt, long a key ally of the United States. In July, the Egyptian military ousted the country’s first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, after enormous demonstrations against him. Then, in August, Egypt’s army and security forces killed hundreds of Morsi’s supporters in a violent crackdown. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print. But nowhere have dashed hopes been more jarring than in Egypt, long a key ally of the United States. In July, the Egyptian military ousted the country’s first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, after enormous demonstrations against him. Then, in August, Egypt’s army and security forces killed hundreds of Morsi’s supporters in a violent crackdown. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print.
  • 13. Bulleted notes: Bulleted Notes: • Protestors supported MM • Military attacked protesters w/ vehicles, weapons • Cairo = violence • 12 hours, 600 killed, 4000 injured Security and protesters faced bloody battle in Cairo Security forces used armored vehicles, bulldozers, tear gas, birdshot, live ammunition, and snipers to raze encampments of protesters who supported the deposed Islamist president. The confrontation lasted more than 12 hours and turned parts of Cairo into a war zone. More than 600 people were killed and close to 4,000 injured. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print. Security forces used armored vehicles, bulldozers, tear gas, birdshot, live ammunition, and snipers to raze encampments of protesters who supported the deposed Islamist president. The confrontation lasted more than 12 hours and turned parts of Cairo into a war zone. More than 600 people were killed and close to 4,000 injured. Smith, Patricia. "Has the Arab Spring Failed?" The New York Times Upfront 16 Sept. 2013: 6-9. Print.
  • 14. Now, you try: • Take your bulleted notes from your reading and use them to write a paraphrased paragraph. • We will take 3 minutes to do this.
  • 15. Paraphrasing: PaOriginal Text: But nowhere have dashed hopes been more jarring than in Egypt, long a key ally of the United States. In July, the Egyptian military ousted the country’s first democratically elected president, Mohamed Morsi, after enormous demonstrations against him. Then, in August, Egypt’s army and security forces killed hundreds of Morsi’s supporters in a violent crackdown. In Cairo, the Egyptian capital city, violence was rampant. The military attacked protesters with vehicles and weapons. In just 12 hours, 600 people were killed and over 4000 citizens were injured.
  • 16. Paraphrasing: Bulleted Notes: • Egyptian gov’t. unstable • Egypt = US ally • Military overthrew Mohamed Morsi • Gov’t. killed MM supporters • Military attacked protesters w/ vehicles, weapons • Cairo = violence • 12 hours, 600 killed, 4000 injured PaParaphrase: Egypt was significantly impacted by the Arab Spring. The Egyptian military overthrew their leader, Mohamed Morsi, and the government killed his supporters. In Cairo, the Egyptian capital city, violence was rampant. The military attacked protesters with vehicles and weapons. In just 12 hours, 600 people were killed and over 4000 citizens were injured.
  • 17. Step 3: Citing Sources We cite our sources in a Bibliography at the end of our project. This is always required!
  • 18. What is a Bibliography?? A Bibliography is a list of the sources that you used when you researched, wrote and prepared your project.
  • 19. What are sources?? They can be: Books Websites Ebooks Images Music
  • 20. Why do we need to include a Bibliography?? 1. When you use someone else's ideas, words, music, or images in your project it is only fair to give them proper credit. 2. Citing your sources in a bibliography means that others can locate and use your sources also.
  • 21. LibGuide For World Cultures found on the Westminster website under research guides at the George Woodruff Library page
  • 22. LibGuide link: http://westminsterschools.libgui des.com/aecontent.php?pid=50 8138&sid=4181451
  • 23. Welcome to NoodleTools! Create a personal account: Expected year of graduation = 2020. Personal ID and password should be your Westminster log on information. Initials and phone digits are in case you forget your log in information. register
  • 24. Create a new project Click “create a new project” at top right Citation style: MLA Citation level: Junior Description: ex: World Cultures 6: Arab Spring