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Inviting/Disinviting Language
Inviting/Disinviting Language
Inviting/Disinviting Language
Inviting/Disinviting Language
Inviting/Disinviting Language
Inviting/Disinviting Language
Inviting/Disinviting Language
Inviting/Disinviting Language
Inviting/Disinviting Language
Inviting/Disinviting Language
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Inviting/Disinviting Language

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Presentation by Klaassen on using inviting versus disinviting language.

Presentation by Klaassen on using inviting versus disinviting language.

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  • 1. The basis of being inviting is building relationships. The effective teacher is deliberately inviting.
  • 2. Four Areas of Invitation verbal comments personal behaviors physical environment self-talk
  • 3. Sort the following strips into two categories: INVITATIONAL DISINVITATIONAL
  • 4. Students can refuse words, but they cannot refuse an invitational attitude.
  • 5. Four Levels of Invitational Education Intentionally Disinviting: These teachers deliberately demean, discourage, defeat, and dissuade students. And they never smile.
  • 6. Unintentionally Disinviting: These teachers are oblivious to the fact that they are negative people. They feel that they are well-meaning but are seen by others as chauvinistic, condescending, racist, sexist, patronizing, or thoughtless. And they keep their arms folded when interacting with students.
  • 7. Unintentionally Inviting: These are the “natural-born teachers.” Such teachers are generally well-liked and effective but are unaware of why they are effective. They are usually affable, and this characteristic often hides the fact that their students may not be learning to their fullest potential. These teachers are sincere, they try very hard, and we like to have them as friends. And they bubble with excitement.
  • 8. Intentionally Inviting: These teachers have a professional attitude, work diligently and consistently, and strive to be more effective. They have a sound philosophy of education and can analyze the process of student learning. They know what it means to be invitational, and they work at it. They also use the proper emotion at the appropriate time.
  • 9. With your table, look at the charts we’ve created. Which of these actions are intentional? Which are unintentional?
  • 10. Effective teachers know how to open the door and invite their students to learn.

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