Intext referencing and bibliographies 2014 terrace
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Intext referencing and bibliographies 2014 terrace Presentation Transcript

  • 1. T E R R A C E L I B R A R Y REFERENCING FOR ASSIGNMENTS Adapted from: King, J. (n.d.). In-text referencing for A+ Assignments [powerpoint]. School Library Association of Queensland.
  • 2. APA REFERENCING • APA is the referencing style used at Terrace Why reference? • To acknowledge information and ideas from other sources. • To identify sources - to verify quotations and to enable readers to follow up information used. • To avoid plagiarism. • To give your work academic integrity. • To add value and quality to your work.
  • 3. THREE STEPS OF REFERENCING • 1. As you read and take notes, record the full bibliographic details and relevant page numbers/URL of the sources from which information is taken. • 2. As you write the assignment, insert in-text citations at the appropriate places. • 3. At the end of your assignment, include a List of References (or Bibliography) that includes all sources used.
  • 4. APA REFERENCING In-text Referencing End-text Referencing • Refers to sources used within your assignment • Includes written quotes, summaries or paraphrasing. • Includes graphic references: • Graphs, maps, diagrams labelled as „Figures‟ • Tables labelled „Tables‟ • Uses (author, date, page. #). •List of References = a list of sources used as in-text reference in the assignment OR • Bibliography = all sources used in preparation of assignment, whether used in-text or not. • Check with your teacher which type of end-text reference they would prefer. Most will prefer a bibliography at school level.
  • 5. WHEN SHOULD I USE IN-TEXT REFERENCING? • You need to reference information such as statistics and research findings, as well as the ideas, concepts and theories of other authors. • ‘Common knowledge’ information does not need referencing. TOPIC: Climate Change Common knowledge information which does NOT need to be referenced: Information which does need to be referenced: The climate change debate involves both sceptics and supporters arguing the extent and nature of changes in the earth’s temperature. • Australian temperatures have risen by about 1C since 1910. • Last year’s spring season saw above average mean temperatures across the entire country.
  • 6. Cardiff University Information Services 2006 double
  • 7. TYPES OF IN-TEXT REFERENCES • “Obesity in Australian children has reached crisis proportions” (Stanton, 2008, p. 82). • Nutritionist Dr Rosemary Stanton (2008, p. 82) warns, “Obesity in Australian children has reached crisis proportions”. (Keep citation close to name). • Nutritionists have warned that child obesity is a critical issue in Australian health (Stanton, 2008, p. 82). • Nutritionist Dr Rosemary Stanton (2008, p. 82) warns that child obesity is a critical issue in Australian health. (Keep citation close to name). Direct Quote Indirect Quote Information Prominent Information Prominent Author Prominent Author Prominent
  • 8. YOUR TURN • “Smoking is a lethal habit” (Jones, 2012, p. 6). • Smoking is a deadly activity (Jones, 2012, p.6). • According to Dr Jones (2012, p. 6) smoking is a deadly activity. • Dr Jones (2012, p. 6) warns, “Smoking is a lethal habit”. Direct or Indirect quote? Direct or Indirect quote? Direct or Indirect quote? Direct or Indirect quote? Information or Author prominent? Information or Author prominent? Information or Author prominent? Information or Author prominent?
  • 9. DIRECT QUOTES • Are the actual words of the author. • Place direct quote in double inverted commas. • Direct quotes do not add to the word count. • The citation should include author surname, year published, page number. For example (Smith, 2013, p.34). • Place the full stop after the brackets.
  • 10. INDIRECT QUOTES • These use the author’s ideas but not author’s exact words. • They summarise or paraphrase an idea, a finding, or an opinion of an author. • Indirect quotes are usually included in a word count.
  • 11. EXAMPLE OF IN-TEXT REFERENCING A Year 12 PE assignment on Sports Psychology and Volleyball: Sports psychology is now a vital aspect of modern professional sports. It has been defined as “that field of psychology which is primarily concerned with the scientific investigation of the psychological aspects of sport” (Wills & Quinlivan, 1991, p. 161). They emphasise that the power of the mind to fuel and enhance successful performance is equally as important as improving the techniques fundamental to each sport. Morris and Summers (1995, p. 18) agree with this view, positing that the role of the sports psychologist is now integral to the success of high-achieving sportsmen and women. Volleyball is an ideal sport to incorporate aspects of sports psychology because success here depends heavily on non-physical attributes.
  • 12. IN-TEXT REFERENCING A WEBSITE • Never include the URL in an in-text reference. • Show the author, year and page number. • If there is no page number, include the paragraph number. • (You will need to count the paragraphs yourself). • Example: The Reserve Bank has encouraging evidence to suggest that, "businesses outside the resources sector were showing some signs of investing” (Janda, 2012, para. 7).
  • 13. IN-TEXT REFERENCING A FIGURE • All maps, graphs, charts, diagrams and images are referred to as a ‘Figure’. • Include an in-text reference under each figure. • Mention the figure in your writing. For example: As Figure 1 illustrates, the Daintree contains vegetation strata typical of tropical rainforests. • Then enter all the bibliographic details in your List of References/ Bibliography.
  • 14. IN-TEXT REFERENCING A FIGURE Figure 1: Rain Forest Daintree Australia. From Australian, 2005, Retrieved from http://www.retas.de/thomas/travel/australia2005/index.html
  • 15. IN-TEXT REFERENCING A TABLE Table 1: Fluctuation of Cane Revenue 2001-2010 Adapted from Sugar of Australia, (p.26), by F. Richards, 2011, Sydney: Random House Then comment in-text: Sugar prices were at their lowest in 2003, but have risen dramatically in recent years (See Table 1). Then enter all the details (not just author & date) in your bibliography.
  • 16. THE BASICS – BIBLIOGRAPHIC DETAILS FOR A BOOK • Author’s surname and initials OR corporate author • Most recent year of publication • Title of book • Place of publication • Publisher
  • 17. BOOK – BIBLIOGRAPHY Gaddis, J.L. (2007). The cold war. London: Penguin. Author surname Author initials Year published Title - in italics Place of publication Publisher
  • 18. THE BASICS – BIBLIOGRAPHIC DETAILS FOR A WEB PAGE • Author’s surname and initials OR corporate author • Date of publication - use (n.d) for no date • Title of web page • URL • Date retrieved if the web page is likely to change over time
  • 19. WEB PAGE – BIBLIOGRAPHY Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology. (2014). Climate change and variability. Retrieved April 21, 2014 from http://www.bom.gov.au/climate/change/ Author Date Title Date retrieved URL
  • 20. LIST OF REFERENCES OR BIBLIOGRAPHY • Put on separate page • Put entries in alphabetical order of author’s surname or corporate author (or title if no author). • No numbers or bullet points • No subheadings • Include a reference of all sources used – print, online, images, graphs.
  • 21. EXAMPLES OF END-TEXT REFERENCES • Book Example: McGregor, C. (1974). The Great Barrier Reef. Amsterdam: Time-Life Publications. • Database Example: Willandra Lakes Region. (1999). Encyclopaedia of Australia. Webster Publishing. Retrieved from http://elibrary.bigchalk.com • Website Example: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation. (2013). Lord Howe Island Group. Retrieved from http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/186 • Image Example: Schoch, T. (2005). Rain Forest Daintree Australia [Image]. Retrieved April 30, 2013, from http://www.retas.de/thomas/travel/australia2005/index.html • Online Encyclopaedia Example: Fraser Island. (2013). In Britannica Student Encyclopaedia. Retrieved April 29, 2013 from http://school.eb.com.au/eb/article-9035206 • Case Law Example: Commonwealth v. Tasmania (1983) 158 CLR 1 (Tasmanian Dam Case)
  • 22. Commonwealth v. Tasmania (1983) 158 CLR 1 (Tasmanian Dam Case) Fraser Island. (2013). In Britannica Student Encyclopaedia. Retrieved April 29, 2013 from http://school.eb.com.au/eb/article-9035206 McGregor, C. (1974). The Great Barrier Reef. Amsterdam: Time-Life Publications. Schoch, T. (2005). Rain Forest Daintree Australia [Image]. Retrieved April 30, 2013, from http://www.retas.de/thomas/travel/australia2005/index.html United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation. (2013). Lord Howe Island Group. Retrieved from http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/186 Willandra Lakes Region. (1999). Encyclopaedia of Australia. Webster Publishing. Retrieved from http://elibrary.bigchalk.com BIBLIOGRAPHY
  • 23. LIBRARY WEBSITE • For further information go to the Terrace Library website, APA Referencing page: • http://libguides.terrace.qld.edu.au/apareferencing • This page includes: • Bibliographic generators • Tutorial on Word References Function • Link to QUT Cite/Write website • University of Queensland Referencing Guide PDF