Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Sist.nerv.(1)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Sist.nerv.(1)

73

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
73
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • A nerve cell, showing its specialized parts and their functions.
  • The ionic composition of a neuron’s cytoplasm is significantly different from that of the extracellular fluid. The neuron maintains high concentrations of K+ and large organic ions (Org– ); the extracellular fluid is high in Na+ and Cl– .
  • The synaptic terminal contains numerous vesicles that enclose a neurotransmitter for which the postsynaptic neuron has membrane receptors. When an action potential enters the synaptic terminal of the presynaptic neuron, the vesicles dump their neurotransmitter into the gap between the neurons. The neurotransmitter diffuses rapidly across the space, binds to postsynaptic receptors, and causes ion channels to open. Ions flow through these open channels, causing a postsynaptic potential in the postsynaptic cell.
  • The organization and functions of the vertebrate nervous system
  • (a) Structural (colored) and functional (labeled) regions of the human left cerebral cortex. A map of the right cerebral cortex would be similar, except that speech and language are less well developed there. (b) The chart shows the distribution of abilities between the two hemispheres.
  • The limbic system extends through several brain regions. It seems to be the center of most unconscious emotional behaviors, such as love, hate, hunger, sexual responses, and fear. The thalamus is a crucial relay center among the senses, the limbic system, and the cerebral cortex.
  • The spinal cord runs from the base of the brain to the lower back and is protected by the vertebrae. Peripheral nerves emerge from between the vertebrae. In cross section, the spinal cord has an outer region of myelinated axons (white matter) that travel to and from the brain and an inner, butterfly-shaped region of dendrites and the cell bodies of association and motor neurons (gray matter). The cell bodies of the sensory neurons are outside the cord in the dorsal root ganglion.
  • This simple reflex circuit includes each of the four elements of a neural pathway. The sensory neuron has pain-sensitive endings in the skin and a long fiber leading to the spinal cord. That neuron stimulates an association neuron in the spinal cord, which in turn stimulates a motor neuron in the cord. The axon of the motor neuron carries action potentials to effectors (muscles), causing them to contract and withdraw the body part from the damaging stimulus. The sensory neuron also makes a synapse on association neurons not involved in the reflex that carry signals to the brain, informing it of the danger.
  • The autonomic nervous system has two divisions: sympathetic and parasympathetic. They supply nerves to many of the same organs but produce opposite effects. Activation of the autonomic nervous system is involuntarily commanded by signals from the hypothalamus, part of the interior of the brain above the spinal cord (see Fig. 33-14).
  • The autonomic nervous system has two divisions: sympathetic and parasympathetic. They supply nerves to many of the same organs but produce opposite effects. Activation of the autonomic nervous system is involuntarily commanded by signals from the hypothalamus, part of the interior of the brain above the spinal cord (see Fig. 33-14).
  • Transcript

    • 1. SISTEMA NERVIOSO
    • 2. SISTEMA NERVIOSO  Controla y coordina las funciones de todo el cuerpo y detecta, interpreta y responde a los estímulos internos y externos.  Los mensajes que transmite son señales eléctricas llamadas impulsos.  La unidad fundamental de este sistema es la Neurona. 1 http://www.fulton.edzone.net/winkler/chapter08/chapter08.html
    • 3. Funciones de la NEURONA Cada neurona debe realizar 4 funciones generales: 1. Recibir información del medio interno, externo y de otras neuronas. 2. Integrar la información recibida y producir una señal de respuesta. 3. Conducir la señal a su terminación. 4. Transmitir a otras neuronas, glándulas o músculos. 2
    • 4. TIPOS DE NEURONAS Existen tres tipos de neuronas:  Neuronas sensitivas. Actúan como receptores que detectan el estímulo específico (luz, presión, sonido, etc.), transmitiendo este estímulo hacia el cerebro y médula espinal.  Neuronas de asociación o internunciales. Están situadas sólo en el encéfalo y la médula espinal, y conectan neuronas sensitivas y motoras.  Neuronas motoras. Transmiten la información lejos del cerebro y médula espinal a los músculos y glándulas (órganos efectores).
    • 5. ESTRUCTURA DE UNA NEURONACuerpo o soma Cuerpo o somaDendritasDendritas Axón de otra neurona Axón de otra neurona AxónAxón Vaina de Mielina Vaina de Mielina Dendritas de otras neuronas Dendritas de otras neuronas
    • 6.  CUERPO CELULAR O SOMA: El cual contiene al núcleo y casi todos los organelos.  DENDRITAS: Son prolongaciones cortas, múltiples, por donde se reciben los impulsos de otra neurona o del medio ambiente.  AXÓN: Es una prolongación larga, única, por donde transita el estímulo hacia los órganos u otras neuronas.  VAINA DE MIELINA: Material grasoso que aísla al axón y aumenta la rapidez de desplazamiento del impulso nervioso.  Axones y dendritas se agrupan en haces de fibras: NERVIOS ESTRUCTURA DE UNA NEURONA
    • 7.  TERMINAL SINÁPTICA: Son dilataciones que se encuentran en las terminaciones ramificadas de los axones o dendritas.  La mayoría de las terminales sinápticas (o botones sinápticos) contienen un tipo específico de sustancia química, llamado neurotransmisor.  Pueden comunicar a la neurona con una glándula, un músculo, una dendrita o un cuerpo celular de otra neurona 2 http://www.krify.com/cognition/articles/realneurons.htm ESTRUCTURA DE UNA NEURONA
    • 8. O rg O rg -- O rg O rg -- OrgOrg -- OrgOrg -- OrgOrg-- OrgOrg -- O rg O rg-- OrgOrg -- O rg O rg-- LA NEURONA MANTIENE EL GRADIENTE IÓNICO (diferencia) KK++ KK++ KK++ KK++ KK++ KK++ KK++ NaNa++ NaNa++ NaNa++ NaNa++ NaNa++ NaNa++ ClCl-- ClCl-- ClCl-- ClCl-- ClCl-- ClCl-- Como bomba iónica mantiene algunos iones adentro: • Iones de potasio • Iones orgánicos Otros iones permanecen afuera: • Iones de sodio • Iones de cloro
    • 9. EL GRADIENTE IONICO LO LOGRA GRACIAS A LA BOMBA DE SODIO-POTASIO  Lo anterior permite que haya diferencias de cargas entre el exterior (+) y el interior (-) de la neurona: POLARIDAD.  La diferencia de carga está dada por la concentración de iones.  Hay mayor concentración de Na+ fuera de la membrana y mayor concentración de K+ dentro de la misma  Esto es posible gracias a la bomba de sodio-potasio (transporte activo).
    • 10. Estructura y función de la sinapsis 1 Inicia acción1 Inicia acción 2 Potencial de acción llega a las terminaciones 2 Potencial de acción llega a las terminaciones 3 Neurotransmisor es liberado 3 Neurotransmisor es liberado 4 Se une el neurotransmisor y se abren los canales 4 Se une el neurotransmisor y se abren los canales
    • 11. Sistema Nervioso Central (SNC) • Recibe y procesa información; • Inicia acción de respuesta Sistema Nervioso Central (SNC) • Recibe y procesa información; • Inicia acción de respuesta Encéfalo • Recibe y procesa información sensorial; • Inicia respuesta; • Almacena memoria; • Genera pensamientos y emociones Encéfalo • Recibe y procesa información sensorial; • Inicia respuesta; • Almacena memoria; • Genera pensamientos y emociones Médula espinal • Conduce señales al y desde el cerebro • Controla actividades reflejas Médula espinal • Conduce señales al y desde el cerebro • Controla actividades reflejas Sistema Nervioso Periférico (SNP) • Transmite señales entre el SNC y el resto del cuerpo Sistema Nervioso Periférico (SNP) • Transmite señales entre el SNC y el resto del cuerpo Neuronas sensitivas • Acarrean señales desde órganos sensitivos hacia el SNC Neuronas sensitivas • Acarrean señales desde órganos sensitivos hacia el SNC S. N. simpático • Prepara al cuerpo para situaciones de stress o actividad física • Respuesta de “pelear o huir” S. N. simpático • Prepara al cuerpo para situaciones de stress o actividad física • Respuesta de “pelear o huir” S. N. Parasimpático • Prevalece durante el tiempo de “reposo” • Actúa directamente en las actividades basales del organismo S. N. Parasimpático • Prevalece durante el tiempo de “reposo” • Actúa directamente en las actividades basales del organismo ORGANIZACIÓN Y FUNCIÓN DEL Sistema NerviosoSistema Nervioso Sistema Nervioso Somático • Controla movimientos voluntarios • Activa al músculo esquelético Sistema Nervioso Somático • Controla movimientos voluntarios • Activa al músculo esquelético Sistema Nervioso Autónomo • Controla las respuestas involuntarias • Influencia en órganos, glándulas y músculo liso Sistema Nervioso Autónomo • Controla las respuestas involuntarias • Influencia en órganos, glándulas y músculo liso Neuronas motoras • Acarrean señales desde el SNC • Controlan actividades de ´músculos y glándulas Neuronas motoras • Acarrean señales desde el SNC • Controlan actividades de ´músculos y glándulas
    • 12. SISTEMA NERVIOSO CENTRAL  Formado por Encéfalo y por la Médula espinal  Protegido por cráneo y vértebras respectivamente.  Su función es transmitir mensajes, procesar y analizar información. http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/spanish/ency/esp_imagepages/19588.htm
    • 13. SISTEMA NERVIOSO CENTRAL (S.N.C.)  El encéfalo y la médula espinal están envueltos por tres capas llamadas meninges.  Entre éstas y el SNC, se encuentra el LCR o líquido cefalorraquídeo que amortigua los golpes y protege al SNC. También intercambia nutrientes y desechos con la sangre.
    • 14. Meninges
    • 15. ENCÉFALO  Lugar al que fluyen y en el que se originan los impulsos.  Recibe, interpreta, almacena y regresa información 2  Contiene aprox. 100 mil millones de neuronas y pesa aprox. 1.400 Kg.  Es el control maestro del organismo.  Se divide en: cerebro, cerebelo, tronco cerebral, tálamo e hipotálamo.
    • 16. EL CEREBRO  Es la región más grande y destacada del encéfalo.  Es responsable de las actividades voluntarias o conscientes del cuerpo.  Es el sitio de la inteligencia, del aprendizaje, del juicio, en una palabra, de la personalidad.  Consta de dos hemisferios cerebrales (derecho e izquierdo) conectados por el cuerpo calloso.  Sus pliegues y hendiduras aumentan con mucho, su superficie. http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/intro/ibank/ibank/0013lll.jpg
    • 17. EL CEREBRO  Cada hemisferio se divide en lóbulos, que reciben su nombre del hueso del cráneo que los cubre.  Los lóbulos son: frontal, parietal, temporal y occipital y cada uno tiene diferentes funciones.  Cada hemisferio recibe sensaciones y controla movimientos del lado opuesto del cuerpo.  El hemisferio derecho se asocia con la creatividad y la capacidad artística y el izquierdo con la capacidad analítica y matemática. http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/intro/ibank/ibank/0013lll.jpg
    • 18. LA CORTEZ A LóbuloLóbulo FrontalFrontal FuncionesFunciones IntelectualesIntelectuales SuperioresSuperiores ÁreaÁrea MotoraMotora PrimariaPrimaria AreaArea PremotoraPremotora ÁreaÁrea Motora delMotora del HablaHabla piernapierna tóraxtórax brazobrazo manomano caracara lengualengua LóbuloLóbulo ParietalParietalÁreaÁrea SensitivaSensitiva PrimariaPrimaria Área deÁrea de AsociaciónAsociación SensitivaSensitiva LóbuloLóbulo OccipitalOccipital ÁreaÁrea VisualVisual PrimariaPrimaria Área deÁrea de AsociaciónAsociación VisualVisual LóbuloLóbulo TemporalTemporal MemoriaMemoria ÁreaÁrea AuditivaAuditiva PrimariaPrimaria ComprensiónComprensión y formacióny formación del lenguajedel lenguaje
    • 19. EL CEREBRO El cerebro tiene dos capas:  La externa o corteza (materia gris), formada por muchos cuerpos neuronales. La corteza procesa la información de los órganos sensoriales y controla movimientos.  La interna es de materia blanca, formada por axones con vainas de mielina. Conecta la corteza cerebral con el tronco cerebral. http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/intro/ibank/ibank/0013lll.jpg
    • 20. EL CEREBELO  Es la segunda región más grande del encéfalo.  Está ubicado en la parte posterior del cráneo.  Se encarga de mantener el equilibrio, la postura, el tono muscular y ayuda a la coordinación de movimientos finos. http://www.brainexplorer.org/glossary/hindbrain.shtml
    • 21. EL TRONCO O TALLO CEREBRAL  Está ubicado por debajo del cerebelo y conecta el encéfalo y la médula espinal.  Consta de Bulbo raquídeo y Protuberancia anular o puente de Varolio.  Es una especie de “conmutador” que regula el flujo de información entre el encéfalo y el resto del cuerpo. 2 Audersirk T., Audersirk T., Byers B. “Biología, Ciencia y naturaleza” Pearson, Prentice Hall, 2004
    • 22. EL TRONCO O TALLO CEREBRAL  El bulbo raquídeo, controla diversas funciones autónomas, como la frecuencia respiratoria y cardiaca la deglución, la tos, el hipo, el parpadeo, el vómito y el estornudo.  La protuberancia anular o Puente de Varolio se localiza arriba del bulbo raquídeo; influye en la transición entre dormir y despertarse y entre los diversos estadios del sueño. 2 Audersirk T., Audersirk T., Byers B. “Biología, Ciencia y naturaleza” Pearson, Prentice Hall, 2004
    • 23. EL TÁLAMO Y EL HIPOTÁLAMO  Se encuentran entre el tronco cerebral y el cerebro.  El Tálamo recibe mensajes de los receptores sensoriales y transmite la información a la región adecuada del cerebro, para que la procese más a fondo.  El Hipotálamo es el centro del control para el reconocimiento del hambre, sed, cansancio, ira y la temperatura corporal. Controla la coordinación de los sistemas nervioso y endocrino. Al igual que el Tálamo, produce emociones como el miedo, rabia, tranquilidad, sed, placer y las respuestas sexuales.
    • 24. EL TÁLAMO Y EL HIPOTÁLAMO Corteza Cerebral Tálamo Hipotálamo Amígdala Hipocampo
    • 25. MÉDULA ESPINAL  Está situada en un canal semicerrado, llamado canal vertebral.  Tiene 31 pares de nervios por los cuales corren los estímulos nerviosos del cerebro al Sistema Nervioso Periférico.  Es el Centro del Control Nervioso. http://www.becomehealthynow.com/popups/spine_nerve.htm
    • 26. Médula espinal MateriaMateria blancablanca MateriaMateria grisgris Canal del epéndimo Raíz dorsal Raíz ganglio dorsal Raíz ventral Nervio Periférico
    • 27. Arco reflejo 1. Receptor de dolor estimulado 2. Señal transmitida por neurona sensitiva 4. Neurona motora estimulada 3. Señal transmitida en la médula espinal 5. Músculo efector Retira la mano
    • 28. SISTEMA NERVIOSO PERIFÉRICO  Es un sistema consistente en 31 pares de nervios espinales o raquídeos, los cuales están conectados con la médula espinal. http://www.sirinet.net/~jgjohnso/periperalns.html http://www.sirinet.net/~jgjohnso/periperalns.html 2 Audersirk T., Audersirk T., Byers B. “Biología, Ciencia y naturaleza” Pearson, Prentice Hall, 2004
    • 29. SISTEMA NERVIOSO PERIFÉRICO  Está formado también por 12 pares de nervios craneales, quienes se conectan directamente con el cerebro 2.  Tiene dos divisiones:
    • 30. SISTEMA NERVIOSO PERIFÉRICO  Sistema somático. El cual se conecta con músculos esqueléticos involucrados con los movimientos voluntarios del cuerpo y con las sensaciones de la piel.  Sistema autónomo. Se conecta con órganos y estructuras involuntarias, control inconsciente e interno, conectándose con músculos lisos , músculo cardiaco y algunas glándulas 2  Se subdivide en simpático y parasimpático, cuyas acciones son antagonistas (opuestas): 2 Audersirk T., Audersirk T., Byers B. “Biología, Ciencia y naturaleza” Pearson, Prentice Hall, 2004
    • 31. SISTEMA AUTÓNOMO  Sistema Simpático: Tiende a inhibir la homeostasis, incrementa la interacción del organismo con el medio externo, su máxima actividad se da en tiempos de máxima alerta (STRESS), provoca al sistema de alarma, preparando al organismo para pelear o huir, así como respuestas muy intensas como las sexuales 2. 2 Audersirk T., Audersirk T., Byers B. “Biología, Ciencia y naturaleza” Pearson, Prentice Hall, 2004
    • 32. SISTEMA AUTÓNOMO  Sistema Parasimpático: Mantiene la homeostasis (equilibrio) del organismo, tiende a regular las funciones de los órganos internos, ejem: regula el flujo de sangre al tracto gastrointestinal. Domina la función orgánica cuando NO hay muchos estímulos (NO stress).2  Las siguientes pantallas son sólo algunos ejemplos de cómo actúan tanto el Sistema Parasimpático como el Sistema simpático: 2 Audersirk T., Audersirk T., Byers B. “Biología, Ciencia y naturaleza” Pearson, Prentice Hall, 2004
    • 33. SISTEMA AUTÓNOMO  Las siguientes pantallas son sólo algunos ejemplos de cómo actúan tanto el Sistema parasimpático como el Sistema simpático: 2 Audersirk T., Audersirk T., Byers B. “Biología, Ciencia y naturaleza” Pearson, Prentice Hall, 2004
    • 34. SISTEMA NERVIOSO AUTÓNOMO PARASIMPÁTICO SIMPÁTICO
    • 35. SISTEMA NERVIOSO AUTÓNOMO PARASIMPÁTICO SIMPÁTICO

    ×