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Python Puzzlers
 

Python Puzzlers

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Following a game show format made popular by Joshua Bloch and Neal Gafter's Java Puzzlers this presentation intends to both entertain and inform. Snippets of Python code the whose behaviour is not ...

Following a game show format made popular by Joshua Bloch and Neal Gafter's Java Puzzlers this presentation intends to both entertain and inform. Snippets of Python code the whose behaviour is not entirely obvious are shown, the audience will then be asked to pick from a number of options what the behaviour of the program is. The correct and sometimes non-intuitive answer will then be given along with a brief explanation of the idea the puzzle exposes. Only a modest working knowledge of the Python language is required to understand the puzzles, but the puzzles may also entertain the more experienced Python programmer.

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    Python Puzzlers Python Puzzlers Presentation Transcript

    • Python Puzzlers Tendayi Mawushe PyCon Ireland 2010
    • Introduction Eight Python Puzzles Short Python program with curious behaviour What is the output? (multiple choice) The correct answer given How to fix the problem (if there was one) The moral of the story What will be covered Language and core libraries Python 2.6 & 3.x (some puzzles apply to 2.6 only)
    • 1. Exceptional Circumstances try: raise NameError('some_name') except TypeError, NameError: print ('caught exception NameError') except Exception: pass
    • 1. What is the output? try: raise NameError('some_name') except TypeError, NameError: print ('caught exception NameError') except Exception: pass (a) caught exception NameError (b) SyntaxError: invalid syntax (c) <no output> (d) caught exception TypeError
    • 1. What is the output? (a) caught exception NameError (b) SyntaxError: invalid syntax (c) <no output> (d) caught exception TypeError
    • 1. A closer look try: raise NameError('some_name') except TypeError, NameError: print ('caught exception NameError') except Exception: pass
    • 1. How do you fix it? try: raise NameError('some_name') except (TypeError, NameError): print ('caught exception NameError') except Exception: pass >>> caught exception NameError
    • 1. The moral of the story When catching multiple exceptions in a single except clause you must surround them in parentheses This problem is non-existent problem in Python 3.x because the problematic syntax is not permitted: except SomeException, variable # not valid 3.x syntax except SomeException as variable
    • 2. Final Countdown seconds = 10 for i in range(10): --seconds if seconds: print('Wait for it.', seconds) else: print('Happy New Year!', seconds)
    • 2. What is the output? seconds = 10 for i in range(10): --seconds if seconds: print('Wait for it.', seconds) else: print('Happy New Year!', seconds) (a) ('Wait for it.', 10) (b) -10 (c) SyntaxError: invalid syntax (d) ('Happy New Year!', 0)
    • 2. What is the output? (a) ('Wait for it.', 10) (b) -10 (c) SyntaxError: invalid syntax (d) ('Happy New Year!', 0)
    • 2. A closer look seconds = 10 for i in range(10): --seconds if seconds: print('Wait for it.', seconds) else: print('Happy New Year!', seconds)
    • 2. How do you fix it? seconds = 10 for i in range(10): seconds -= 1 if seconds: print('Wait for it.', seconds) else: print('Happy New Year!', seconds) >>> ('Happy New Year!', 0)
    • 2. The moral of the story There is no -- or ++ operator in Python to achieve that effect use -= 1 and += 1 --seconds is actually the same as -(-seconds)
    • 3. Local News def news(headline): sports = 'Soccer' for story in locals(): print(locals()[story]) news('Politics')
    • 3. What is the output? def news(headline): sports = 'Soccer' for story in locals(): print(locals()[story]) news('Politics') (a) Politics Soccer (b) {'sports': 'Soccer'} (c) Soccer (d) RuntimeError: dictionary changed size during iteration
    • 3. What is the output? (a) Politics Soccer (b) {'sports': 'Soccer'} (c) Soccer (d) RuntimeError: dictionary changed size during iteration
    • 3. A closer look def news(headline): sports = 'Soccer' for story in locals(): print(locals()[story]) news('Politics')
    • 3. How do you fix it? def news(headline): sports = 'Soccer' stories = locals() for story in stories: print(stories[story]) news('Politics') >>> Politics Soccer
    • 3. The moral of the story When locals() is invoked it updates and returns a dictionary representing the current local symbol table You should never attempt to update the locals dictionary, however if you need to access it's contents in a loop assign it to another name first
    • 4. TGIF days = ['Mon', 'Tue', 'Wed', 'Thu', 'Fri', 'Sat', 'Sun'] weekend = enumerate(days)[5:] for day in weekend: print(day[0], day[1])
    • 4. What is the output? days = ['Mon', 'Tue', 'Wed', 'Thu', 'Fri', 'Sat', 'Sun'] weekend = enumerate(days)[5:] for day in weekend: print(day[0], day[1]) (a) (5, 'Sat') (6, 'Sun') (b) ('Sat', 'Sun') (c) TypeError: object is unsubscriptable (d) (5, 6)
    • 4. What is the output? (a) (5, 'Sat') (6, 'Sun') (b) ('Sat', 'Sun') (c) TypeError: object is unsubscriptable (d) (5, 6)
    • 4. A closer look days = ['Mon', 'Tue', 'Wed', 'Thu', 'Fri', 'Sat', 'Sun'] weekend = enumerate(days)[5:] for day in weekend: print(day[0], day[1])
    • 4. How do you fix it? days = ['Mon', 'Tue', 'Wed', 'Thu', 'Fri', 'Sat', 'Sun'] weekend = list(enumerate(days))[5:] for day in weekend: print(day[0], day[1]) >>> (5, 'Sat') (6, 'Sun')
    • 4. The moral of the story The enumerate built-in function is a generator, that is it returns an iterator Iterators are not sequences therefore they cannot be indexed or sliced: If you need to index or slice an iterator you must first convert it to a list, this loads the entire dataset into memory Generators can represent infinite chain of values for example itertools.count(), these cannot be meaningfully sliced in reverse
    • 5. Rabbits everywhere a, b = 0, 1 def fibonacci(n): for i in range(n): a, b = b, a + b return a fib8 = fibonacci(8) print(fib8)
    • 5. What is the output? a, b = 0, 1 def fibonacci(n): for i in range(n): a, b = b, a + b return a fib8 = fibonacci(8) print(fib8) (a) UnboundLocalError: local variable (b) 21 (c) 1 (d) 0
    • 5. What is the output? (a) UnboundLocalError: local variable (b) 21 (c) 1 (d) 0
    • 5. A closer look a, b = 0, 1 def fibonacci(n): for i in range(n): a, b = b, a + b return a fib8 = fibonacci(8) print(fib8)
    • 5. How do you fix it? a, b = 0, 1 def fibonacci(n): global a, b for i in range(n): a, b = b, a + b return a fib8 = fibonacci(8) print(fib8) >>> 21
    • 5. The moral of the story The issue is local variable optimisation. If a variable is assigned in a function it is a local variable, the bytecode generated to access it is different to that for global variables. A variable in a function can either be local or global, but not both. Do not mix up global and local names in this way, it is confusing and problematic.
    • 6. The Whole Truth w = False h = [] o = 0, l = None e = {} print(any((w, h, o, l, e)))
    • 6. What is the output? w = False h = [] o = 0, l = None e = {} print(any((w, h, o, l, e))) (a) True (b) (w, h, o, l, e) (c) (False, [], 0, None, {}) (d) False
    • 6. What is the output? (a) True (b) (w, h, o, l, e) (c) (False, [], 0, None, {}) (d) False
    • 6. A closer look w = False h = [] O = 0, l = None e = {} print(any((w, h, o, l, e)))
    • 6. How do you fix it? w = False h = [] O = 0 l = None e = {} print(any((w, h, o, l, e))) >>> False
    • 6. The moral of the story The comma is the tuple constructor, not the parentheses Though it is not required it is generally considered good style to use parentheses when creating a tuple: (0,) is better than 0,
    • 7. Double or Nothing def double(items, doubles=[]): for item in items: doubles.append(item * 2) return doubles numbers = double([1, 2, 3]) words = double(['one', 'two', 'three']) print(words)
    • 7. What is the output? def double(items, doubles=[]): for item in items: doubles.append(item * 2) return doubles numbers = double([1, 2, 3]) words = double(['one', 'two', 'three']) print(words) (a) [2, 4, 6, 'oneone', 'twotwo', 'threethree'] (b) ['oneone', 'twotwo', 'threethree'] (c) TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for * (d) [2, 4, 6]
    • 7. What is the output? (a) [2, 4, 6, 'oneone', 'twotwo', 'threethree'] (b) ['oneone', 'twotwo', 'threethree'] (c) TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for * (d) [2, 4, 6]
    • 7. A closer look def double(items, doubles=[]): for item in items: doubles.append(item * 2) return doubles numbers = double([1, 2, 3]) words = double(['one', 'two', 'three']) print(words)
    • 7. How do you fix it? def double(items, doubles=None): if doubles is None: doubles = [] for item in items: doubles.append(item * 2) return doubles numbers = double([1, 2, 3]) words = double(['one', 'two', 'three']) print(words) >>> ['oneone', 'twotwo', 'threethree']
    • 7. The moral of the story Do not use mutable types as default arguments Default arguments are evaluated when the function is defined not when the function is called If you want to use a mutable type as a default argument, set the default to None and initialise it properly inside the function
    • 8. Evening Out the Odds nums = [01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10] evens = [] for num in nums: if num % 2 != 0: # is the number odd evens.append(num + 1) print(evens)
    • 8. What is the output? nums = [01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10] evens = [] for num in nums: if num % 2 != 0: # is the number odd evens.append(num + 1) print(evens) (a) [2, 4, 6, 8, 10] (b) SyntaxError: invalid token (c) [02, 04, 06, 08, 10] (d) [2, 2, 4, 4, 6, 6, 8, 8, 10, 10]
    • 8. What is the output? (a) [2, 4, 6, 8, 10] (b) SyntaxError: invalid token (c) [02, 04, 06, 08, 10] (d) [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
    • 8. A closer look nums = [01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 08, 09, 10] evens = [] for num in nums: if num % 2 != 0: # is the number odd evens.append(num + 1) print(evens)
    • 8. How do you fix it? nums = [01, 02, 03, 04, 05, 06, 07, 010, 011, 012] evens = [] for num in nums: if num % 2 != 0: # is the number odd evens.append(oct(num + 1)) print(evens) >>> ['02', '04', '06', '010', '012']
    • 8. The moral of the story In Python 2.x a leading 0 specifies an octal literal If you want to work with octal numbers remember the valid digits are 0 though 7 In Python 3.x octal literals are specified using 0o, which removes the ambiguity 01 # not valid 3.x syntax 0o1
    • Links Slides: insmallportions.com Q & A: stackoverflow.com Inspiration: javapuzzlers.com