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The plates are moving at a very

slow rate of about one to ten
centimeters per year.
In areas plates are moving

togethe...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mW
Qs1_L3fA
Click here for a hyperlink to an animation of convection
A convergent boundary is where two
plates come together, or converge. The
result of the plates hitting together is
called...
a. Continental crust to continental

b. Continental crust to oceanic
c. Oceanic crust to oceanic
a. Continental crust to continental crust
Before collision

Example: India-Asia
(Himalayas)

After collision

from: http:/...
Eurasian
plate
Indian plate

Indian plate (continental crust) running into
Eurasian plate (continental crust)
Folded mountains – notice the rock layers
SUBDUCTION
The process by
which the ocean
floor sinks
beneath a deepocean trench
and back into
the mantle is
called
Oceanic crust is
MORE DENSE
than Continental!
• Because one plate gets pushed
under another, it is called
subduction.
• This is where volcanoes and
trenches form!

all ...
Volcanoes
form where
a
convergent
boundary
occurs
between
oceanic
crust and
continental
crust.
South American plate (continental crust) running into
Nazca plate (oceanic crust)
SUBDUCTION
Volcanoes also form where a
convergent boundary occurs
between oceanic crust and oceanic
crust.
Aleutian islands of Alaska are volcanoes
formed by oceanic crust converging
with oceanic crust
Following volcanic islands in the
Pacific Ocean can show us where
oceanic crust is being subducted
by oceanic crust.
Here is an great link for seeing
where each type of boundary is
located.
Plate tectonics review
Plate tectonics review
Plate tectonics review
Plate tectonics review
Plate tectonics review
Plate tectonics review
Plate tectonics review
Plate tectonics review
Plate tectonics review
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Plate tectonics review

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Transcript of "Plate tectonics review"

  1. 1. The plates are moving at a very slow rate of about one to ten centimeters per year. In areas plates are moving together and others are moving apart.
  2. 2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mW Qs1_L3fA
  3. 3. Click here for a hyperlink to an animation of convection
  4. 4. A convergent boundary is where two plates come together, or converge. The result of the plates hitting together is called a collision.
  5. 5. a. Continental crust to continental b. Continental crust to oceanic c. Oceanic crust to oceanic
  6. 6. a. Continental crust to continental crust Before collision Example: India-Asia (Himalayas) After collision from: http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/~crlb/COURSES/2
  7. 7. Eurasian plate Indian plate Indian plate (continental crust) running into Eurasian plate (continental crust)
  8. 8. Folded mountains – notice the rock layers
  9. 9. SUBDUCTION
  10. 10. The process by which the ocean floor sinks beneath a deepocean trench and back into the mantle is called
  11. 11. Oceanic crust is MORE DENSE than Continental!
  12. 12. • Because one plate gets pushed under another, it is called subduction. • This is where volcanoes and trenches form! all from: http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/~crlb/COURSES/270
  13. 13. Volcanoes form where a convergent boundary occurs between oceanic crust and continental crust.
  14. 14. South American plate (continental crust) running into Nazca plate (oceanic crust)
  15. 15. SUBDUCTION
  16. 16. Volcanoes also form where a convergent boundary occurs between oceanic crust and oceanic crust.
  17. 17. Aleutian islands of Alaska are volcanoes formed by oceanic crust converging with oceanic crust
  18. 18. Following volcanic islands in the Pacific Ocean can show us where oceanic crust is being subducted by oceanic crust.
  19. 19. Here is an great link for seeing where each type of boundary is located.
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