Stfc presentation feb 2013

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Presentation given by John Womersley, Chief Executive of STFC, to the IOP on 12th February 2013

Presentation given by John Womersley, Chief Executive of STFC, to the IOP on 12th February 2013

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  • Two phases to the reviewPhase Iidentifies and examines the key functions considers whether the functions are needed if so examines how the functions might best be delivered report to ‘challenge panel’ and then MinistersIf the current delivery model is ok thenPhase IIexamines whether the body’s control and governance arrangements are in accordance with the recognised principles of good corporate governance
  • Two phases to the reviewPhase Iidentifies and examines the key functions considers whether the functions are needed if so examines how the functions might best be delivered report to ‘challenge panel’ and then MinistersIf the current delivery model is ok thenPhase IIexamines whether the body’s control and governance arrangements are in accordance with the recognised principles of good corporate governance
  • Two phases to the reviewPhase Iidentifies and examines the key functions considers whether the functions are needed if so examines how the functions might best be delivered report to ‘challenge panel’ and then MinistersIf the current delivery model is ok thenPhase IIexamines whether the body’s control and governance arrangements are in accordance with the recognised principles of good corporate governance
  • Two phases to the reviewPhase Iidentifies and examines the key functions considers whether the functions are needed if so examines how the functions might best be delivered report to ‘challenge panel’ and then MinistersIf the current delivery model is ok thenPhase IIexamines whether the body’s control and governance arrangements are in accordance with the recognised principles of good corporate governance
  • Two phases to the reviewPhase Iidentifies and examines the key functions considers whether the functions are needed if so examines how the functions might best be delivered report to ‘challenge panel’ and then MinistersIf the current delivery model is ok thenPhase IIexamines whether the body’s control and governance arrangements are in accordance with the recognised principles of good corporate governance

Transcript

  • 1. Professor John WomersleyChief Executive, Science & Technology Facilities Council February 2013
  • 2. Over the past year• New management in place at STFC• Major Projects delivered – E-infrastructure, Catapult, ELI,…• Scientific Successes – Higgs! – KMOS, first light with DES, Diamond 10th anniversary…• Continued momentum – ESA at Harwell, SKA, Hartree Centre
  • 3. STFC Impact Report 2012
  • 4. Triennial ReviewDavid Willetts announced the launch of the Triennial Review of theResearch Councils in a Written Ministerial Statement on 9 JanuaryThe review is a Cabinet Office initiative and will be conducted in two stages:• Stage 1 will assess the core functions of the Research Councils, the need for these functions to continue and the structural options for continued delivery of these functions.• If the conclusions of Stage 1 are that the Research Councils should continue as NDPBs, Stage 2 will examine corporate governance.• BIS aims to complete Stage 1 of the review within six months and anticipates producing a report and conclusions of the whole review by early SeptemberThis is not a review of the policy of funding basic research, to which theGovernment remains committed
  • 5. Triennial Review - continuedOverall Programme/Project Management• Ceri Smith, Richard Ney, Helen HuxtableCore Review Team• Paula Croft – EPSRC and RCUK• Bill Wells - Economic Analysis• Vivien Brighton - MRC• Iain Mansfield – STFC• Sarah Tyrell – AHRC and ESRC• Isobel Pastor – NERC
  • 6. Triennial Review - continued• Cabinet Office put a lot of store in the views of stakeholders• Meetings with key stakeholders set up over February, including the Chairs and CEOs of the Research Councils; Government; businesses; UK Charities and National Academies; and Select Committees. The panel is seeking meetings with other key stakeholders from Universities, TSB and HEFCE, and the International Community
  • 7. Triennial Review - continued• Review team are hosting roundtable discussions on 6 and 8 March and attending a number of external group stakeholder discussions.• Call for Evidence is on the BIS website https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/triennial- review-of-the-research-councils-call-for-evidence
  • 8. Triennial Review – why should you care?• Need to recommend some change (“a pound of flesh”) – Previous reviews of this type led to creation of RCUK and SSC• Review is asking fundamental questions about how research is funded in the UK – How many research councils? – How should they be governed?This will affect you all!
  • 9. Spending review• There will not be a full CSR until after the election• The 2013 Budget will announce a Spending Review to set budget levels for 2015/16• It is expected that the overall envelope for financial year 15/16 will be announced, at the level of the settlement for individual departments. The total BIS budget (including the Science and Research budget) will likely be announced, but no more detail within that.
  • 10. News on spending review - continued• There will then be a process following the Budget to decide spend for 15/16 within departmental allocations. (this includes the Science and Research budget within the BIS allocation)• The starting point for the 15/16 budgets for departments is that they will continue along their present trajectory (for capital, resource and admin). This means further cuts to the overall BIS budget, and does not prejudge what will happen to the Science and Research budget within that, although the starting point would presumably be continued flat cash.
  • 11. News on spending review - continued• Demonstrating efficiency and linkage to economic growth will continue to be essential.• There is unlikely to be significant additional capital/resource spend announced in the spring Budget.
  • 12. Government context• Deterioration in public finances over past year• National debt £1.1 trillion predicted to rise to £1.4 trillion by 2014• Bank of England cut growth forecast• ONS data shows that public borrowing has exceeded official estimates for every month this financial year• Budget deficit up on last year
  • 13. Total Research Council funding 2011 - 2015 2010 Comprehensive Spending Review to set3000 Spending Review budget for 2015/1625002000 we1500 are here1000 500 0 Baseline 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15
  • 14. Implications of CSR10• Flat cash was relatively good result• But inflation is well above 2% target, power costs, unexpected additional charges (CRC tax, OA publishing)…• Two years in – 4.4% loss of purchasing power to end of 2012/13• Another two years – Additional 5% or £26 million
  • 15. Impact of Flat Cash Loss of purchasing power 60 50 40 £m 30 20 10 0 2013-14 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17 International Subs UK Facilities Core Programme Administration• BIS sponsor team suggested we model 2 more years flat cash• The results are not pretty
  • 16. SummaryTriennial Review• Take it seriously – it’s asking fundamental questions and is likely to propose changes https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/triennial- review-of-the-research-councils-call-for-evidenceSpending Review for 2015/16• Another year of flat cash will be very tough; reduced funding even worse• We’ve been working hard to be ready – but it won’t be easyMost important thing we should all be doing is selling theexcellence and importance of our science