CMSMS: Past and Future
           26 Sept. 2009
     Ted Kulp, Shift Refresh Inc.
Who am I?
• 10 years development
  experience
• 12 years in Open Source
• Creator of CMSMS (2004)
• Creator of Silk Framew...
A Brief History of Time
     (in relation to CMSMS)




     2004-2009 and Beyond
First commit!
The original default site
Some things never change
0.2 - 05 Jul 2004
Content Reordering
0.2 - 05 Jul 2004
Content Reordering

                     0.4 - 10 Aug 2004
                        Module API
0.2 - 05 Jul 2004
Content Reordering

                     0.4 - 10 Aug 2004
                        Module API




0.5 - ...
0.6 - 01 Sep 2004
 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004       User Defined Tags
Content Reordering

                     0.4 - 10 Aug 2004
   ...
0.6 - 01 Sep 2004
 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004              User Defined Tags
Content Reordering

    0.10 - 05 Jul 2005      0.4 - 1...
0.6 - 01 Sep 2004
 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004              User Defined Tags
Content Reordering

    0.10 - 05 Jul 2005      0.4 - 1...
0.6 - 01 Sep 2004
 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004              User Defined Tags
Content Reordering

    0.10 - 05 Jul 2005      0.4 - 1...
Why is it called
 “Simple”?
What’s Next?
Why 2.0 didn’t happen
• Overly ambitious for one release
• Relied on a php version that was still too
  new
  • Not an iss...
And this means what...?
Revised Roadmap
•   2.0 - Q1 2010
    •   PHP 5.2
    •   Autoloader
    •   jQuery w/ UI and integrated AJAX
    •   ORM
...
Revised Roadmap
•   2.1
    •   Tree based page permissions
    •   Complex content types (think: CCK)
    •   More separa...
Revised Roadmap
•   2.2
    •   Multi language
        •   Support for multiple content per block
        •   Allows for a...
What’s Missing?
•   Multisite
    •   Too many ways to do this, some of which would make for a coding
        nightmare
  ...
What’s Missing?
•   Front End User Integration
    •   This will happen, we’re just not sure where it fits yet.
    •   The...
Thank you!

Questions?
Geek Moot '09 -- Keynote
Geek Moot '09 -- Keynote
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Geek Moot '09 -- Keynote

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CMSMS: Past and Future. Talk given by Ted Kulp.

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  • Run through the history very quickly. Don’t want to dwindle on the past, but it’s always good to remember where we’ve been. Talk about Boss Ogg (30 year old Americans who had a TV will get the reference). Talk about MPD, switching projects, and being tasked to find a CMS. Talk about doing the same thing everyone else does, blow a weekend installing CMSs.
  • Brilliant Idea. Roll your own. Sure, not like anything else was going on...
  • Not exactly mind blowing, but it’s a start. But here’s the amazing part. Look at the template editor... (next)
  • Notice anything familiar? That’s the part of the system that I find so amazing. Even though we’ve come so far in the past 5 years, the fundamentals created in those first 2 days have stuck. Sure, the code is totally different under the hood, but the concepts remain. I love that fact.

    1.0 was nothing exciting. It was a first step, and that’s all. From there, the system and community grew organically...
  • Geek Moot '09 -- Keynote

    1. 1. CMSMS: Past and Future 26 Sept. 2009 Ted Kulp, Shift Refresh Inc.
    2. 2. Who am I? • 10 years development experience • 12 years in Open Source • Creator of CMSMS (2004) • Creator of Silk Framework (2008) • <plug>Started Shift Refresh, Inc., professional support and services (2008)</plug>
    3. 3. A Brief History of Time (in relation to CMSMS) 2004-2009 and Beyond
    4. 4. First commit!
    5. 5. The original default site
    6. 6. Some things never change
    7. 7. 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004 Content Reordering
    8. 8. 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004 Content Reordering 0.4 - 10 Aug 2004 Module API
    9. 9. 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004 Content Reordering 0.4 - 10 Aug 2004 Module API 0.5 - 22 Aug 2004 Page Aliases
    10. 10. 0.6 - 01 Sep 2004 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004 User Defined Tags Content Reordering 0.4 - 10 Aug 2004 Module API 0.5 - 22 Aug 2004 Page Aliases
    11. 11. 0.6 - 01 Sep 2004 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004 User Defined Tags Content Reordering 0.10 - 05 Jul 2005 0.4 - 10 Aug 2004 Multiple Content Blocks Module API 0.5 - 22 Aug 2004 Page Aliases
    12. 12. 0.6 - 01 Sep 2004 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004 User Defined Tags Content Reordering 0.10 - 05 Jul 2005 0.4 - 10 Aug 2004 Multiple Content Blocks Module API 0.5 - 22 Aug 2004 Page Aliases 0.13 - 18 May 2006 Pretty URLs
    13. 13. 0.6 - 01 Sep 2004 0.2 - 05 Jul 2004 User Defined Tags Content Reordering 0.10 - 05 Jul 2005 0.4 - 10 Aug 2004 Multiple Content Blocks Module API 1.0!!! - 10 Sep 2006 Module Manager 0.5 - 22 Aug 2004 Page Aliases 0.13 - 18 May 2006 Pretty URLs
    14. 14. Why is it called “Simple”?
    15. 15. What’s Next?
    16. 16. Why 2.0 didn’t happen • Overly ambitious for one release • Relied on a php version that was still too new • Not an issue anymore • Too self controlling, which caused: • Lack of involvement from the other devs
    17. 17. And this means what...?
    18. 18. Revised Roadmap • 2.0 - Q1 2010 • PHP 5.2 • Autoloader • jQuery w/ UI and integrated AJAX • ORM • Module API modifications (using ORM for objects) • Module API smarty tags (Less php, more smarty in your modules) • Centralized module templates • Drag/Drop page admin • MicroTiny WYSIWYG standard
    19. 19. Revised Roadmap • 2.1 • Tree based page permissions • Complex content types (think: CCK) • More separation of pages and content • Admin panel smartification (Mostly themes, some admin pages as well) • FTP Based module installer and upgrade routines
    20. 20. Revised Roadmap • 2.2 • Multi language • Support for multiple content per block • Allows for a default language for overriding when a secondary language’s content box isn’t filled in • Allows for alternate page titles and menu text • API methods to allow modules to hook in their text as well
    21. 21. What’s Missing? • Multisite • Too many ways to do this, some of which would make for a coding nightmare • Most people want it (we think) for upgrading sites quickly -- In-admin upgrades (in 2.1) solves this issue • Versioning • Have some ideas on how to do this, but it would require some real fancy interface design. Might work better as a module • Would like to have some kind of API for modules to use, which would require a lot of generic serialization handling • Might work better after the complex content types are up and running
    22. 22. What’s Missing? • Front End User Integration • This will happen, we’re just not sure where it fits yet. • The main issue is that FEU adds SO much functionality, though we’d want our users to be more generic. This would require add-on modules to tack on the existing FEU functions. • Silk Framework • Going to require PHP 5.3 • Going to require more hacking up of the admin panel to write it as a “Silk App” • Will happen, but post 2.2
    23. 23. Thank you! Questions?
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