Medical Tourism White Paper
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Medical Tourism White Paper

on

  • 479 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
479
Views on SlideShare
479
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Medical Tourism White Paper Medical Tourism White Paper Document Transcript

    • LAS VEGAS CONVENTION AND VISITORS AUTHORITY  MEDICAL TOURISM WHITE PAPER  JUNE 2010    1    What is Medical Tourism?  Medical tourism is when an individual travels to a different country/state/city than where they  currently live to receive more affordable medical, dental and/or surgical care than they could  receive in their own country/state/city.  Primarily medical tourism is cost‐driven; however there  is also a smaller component that is driven by better quality of care or specialty care that one  cannot find in their own country/state/city.    Background  With the costs of healthcare rising in the United States, people are starting to look for  alternative means to getting quality medical treatment at a lower price. Many countries around  the world, including India, Thailand and Singapore, are offering medical procedures at as little  as 10 percent of the price one would pay in the U.S.1  This relatively new phenomenon is causing  major healthcare facilities in the U.S. to look at what these off‐shore medical communities are  doing to drive people to their facilities. Medical tourism is a growing industry and in a down  economy, more and more people are looking for affordable healthcare with quality results,  even if it requires travel.  Figure 1  Types of Medical Tourism2       Outbound Medical Tourism                                                                                      Figure 2 shows that in 2007, an estimated 750,000  Americans traveled abroad for medical care. That  number is projected to increase to 6 million by the end  of 2010. Due to the high quality of services that are  less costly, many people travel to Asia to be treated in  countries such as Thailand, Singapore, India and  Malaysia. Figure 3 is a comparison between foreign  costs of medical treatment and that of the U.S. The  market value of medical tourism in these countries                                                               1  Deloitte, Medical Tourism: Consumers in Search of Value, 2008  2  Deloitte, Medical Tourism: Update and Implications  Outbound  U.S. patients traveling to other countries to receive medical care.  Inbound  Patients traveling to the U.S. from other countries to receive medical care.  Intrabound  Patients traveling to various locations within the U.S. to receive medical treatment.  Figure 2 
    • LAS VEGAS CONVENTION AND VISITORS AUTHORITY  MEDICAL TOURISM WHITE PAPER  JUNE 2010    2    was approximately $3 billion in both 2007 and 2008 and estimated to be $4.4 billion in 2012.3     Figure 3  Cost Comparison of U.S. vs. Foreign Elective Surgical Procedures4   Procedure  U.S. Inpatient Price  U.S. Outpatient Price  Average of Three  Lowest Foreign Prices   Knee Surgery  $11,692  $4,686  $1,308  Hernia Repair  $5,377  $3,903  $1,819  Adult Tonsillectomy  $3,844  $2,185  $1,143  Hysterectomy  $6,542  $6,132  $2,114  Cataract Extraction  $4,067  $2,630  $1,282  Rhinoplasty  $5,713  $3,866  $2,156  Glaucoma Procedures  $4,392  $2,593  $1,151    Inbound/Intrabound Medical Tourism  In 2008, more than 400,000 non‐U.S.  residents sought care domestically and  spent almost $5 billion for health services.  In addition, affluent people from foreign  countries came to the U.S. for what they  perceive to be better, yet more expensive  care.5  Many hospitals in the U.S. are  making efforts to bring more people into  their facilities.  For example, the Cleveland  Clinic, widely recognized for the quality of  care it provides and consistently ranked by  U.S. News & World Report as one of the  nation’s best hospitals, has recently  contracted with Lowe’s Home  Improvement to provide care for those  who have insurance through the company  at a discounted rate.6   The Cleveland Clinic  also has hotels and long‐term living  facilities near the hospital. They offer                                                               3  Deloitte, Medical Tourism: Consumers in Search of Value, 2008  4  Deloitte, Medical Tourism: Consumers in Search of Value, 2008  5  Deloitte, Medical Tourism: Consumers in Search of Value, 2008  6  www.cleveland.com, Lowe’s Will Bring Its Workers to Cleveland Clinic for Heart Surgery, by: Harlan Spector, 2010  Figure 4 
    • LAS VEGAS CONVENTION AND VISITORS AUTHORITY  MEDICAL TOURISM WHITE PAPER  JUNE 2010    3    travel agents for those who are traveling to the area for medical treatment as well.  While its  main hospital campus is in Cleveland, the organization includes hospitals and medical facilities  outside of Ohio including Cleveland Clinic Florida, Cleveland Clinic Canada, the Cleveland Clinic  Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health (co‐located in Las Vegas and Cleveland) and Cleveland Clinic  Abu Dhabi (scheduled for completion in 2012).      Ranked as one of the nation’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report for twenty  consecutive years, the Mayo Clinic is another medical facility known for driving visitation due to  its reputation for excellent quality care.  While the Mayo Clinic has operations in several states,  the main campus is located in Rochester, Minnesota. According to the Rochester Convention  and Visitors Bureau, 60 percent of their visitors come for the Mayo Clinic, 18 percent for  business, 14 percent for conventions or sports, 6 percent for leisure and 2 percent for other  reasons.7      While best‐in‐class organizations such as the Cleveland Clinic or the Mayo Clinic may be  attracting out‐of‐market patients, at this time medical tourism seems to be more prominently  geared toward those who are traveling outside the U.S. looking for more affordable medical  treatment.     Market Analysis  According to a survey in the Deloitte Report on Medical Tourism, 88 percent of U.S. healthcare  consumers said they would consider going out of their community or local area if they knew the  outcomes were better and the costs were no higher. Another 39 percent said they would  consider having an elective procedure if they could save 50 percent or more and also be  assured the quality would be the same.      Insurance Companies  Many insurance companies have launched pilot medical tourism programs within their health  benefits. Insurance companies hope this will reduce costs because of the low prices for medical  procedures abroad. For example, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield (WellPoint) in Wisconsin  will send the employees of Serigraph, Inc., a corporate client of Anthem WellPoint, to Apollo  Hospitals in India for certain elective procedures. The pilot program will cover about 700 group                                                               7  www.rochestercvb.org, Rochester's unique history and statistics tell the city's story, January 2010 
    • LAS VEGAS CONVENTION AND VISITORS AUTHORITY  MEDICAL TOURISM WHITE PAPER  JUNE 2010    4    members and all financial details, including travel and medical arrangements, will be managed  by Anthem WellPoint.8     The Medical Tourism Association  The Medical Tourism Association (Medical Travel Association), also known as the Global  Healthcare Association, is the first international nonprofit association made up of the top  international hospitals, healthcare providers, medical travel facilitators, insurance companies,  and other affiliated companies and members with the common goal of promoting the highest  level of quality of healthcare to patients in a global environment. The Medical Tourism  Association has offices in the U.S., Korea, Costa Rica, United Arab Emirates, Israel, Turkey and  Argentina, and has been an organization since August 2007.9     Medical Tourism Association Patient Survey  Every three months, the Medical Tourism Association conducts a survey of those who have  traveled abroad for medical treatment. The findings are summarized as follows: 67 percent of  those who traveled outside the country for medical treatment also participated in some tourist  activities. Another 67 percent rated the hospital stay as being excellent. Once again, 67 percent  said the language barrier in the foreign country did not affect the quality of medical treatment.  Of those who traveled out of the country for medical treatment, 64 percent stated that they did  not have medical insurance. And 68 percent stated the overall experience was better than it  would have been in the U.S.10     Medical Tourism City (MedicalTourismCity.com)  Medical Tourism City is an online social network started by the Medical Tourism Association to  help facilitate an open forum for communication among those professionals involved in medical  tourism and global healthcare, and to facilitate business networking. The social network has  reached over 500 members from more than 40 different countries since its inception. Users  include insurance companies, health insurance agents, medical tourism facilitators, hospitals,  doctors and governments which provide interactive information to the healthcare consumer.    Medical City  A major project that’s been under way for a number of years, and is expected to be complete in  2012, is Medical City in Orlando, Florida. Medical City will include the University of Central                                                               8  Deloitte, Medical Tourism: Update and Implications  9  www.medicaltourismassociation.com, 2010  10  www.medicaltourismassociation.com, MTA Patient Survey, May 2009 
    • LAS VEGAS CONVENTION AND VISITORS AUTHORITY  MEDICAL TOURISM WHITE PAPER  JUNE 2010    5    Florida Medical School, Burnham Medical Research facility, Anderson Cancer Center, Nemours  Children’s Hospital and the Orlando Veterans Affairs Medical Center. These five facilities will  cover approximately 7,000 acres of land with the hope of bringing many professionals to the  area, along with specialized medical treatment. The challenge of promoting the new venture is  making the different facilities within Medical City work together with a unified message to  promote the area.11     The Future of Medical Tourism  Over the past year, medical tourism has seen tremendous growth, and several emerging U.S.  healthcare industry trends could be fueling the demand for medical tourism. Some of these  growth drivers include:   increased demand for outpatient surgery  increased sophistication of medical tourism operations  increased coverage/demand for dental surgery  increased demand for cosmetic surgery  increased globalization of the U.S. work force  increased access to low‐cost global transportation  U.S. health system reform12       Many medical tourism companies, including the Medical Tourism Association and  medicaltourism.com, are emerging because of the growth this industry has seen over the last  year. In a recent article in USA Today titled, “The Top 10 Travel Trends for 2010,” medical  tourism was listed ninth on the list. The article goes on to say that by 2012, an estimated 1.6  million people will combine vacations with carpal tunnel surgery, dental crowns and other  short‐stay, outpatient procedures that cost 30 to 70 percent less than prices in the U.S.13    Online social media websites, massive medical facility complexes, an increase in the amount of  people leaving their homes to receive medical treatment and a down economy all point to the  continued emergence of medical tourism. However, it appears that as cost continues to be a  primary driver affecting healthcare decisions, the majority of future growth will continue to  occur in the outbound travel sector.                                                                 11  http://www.floridatrend.com/article.asp?aID=51804, Medical City is Changing Florida’s DNA, 2010  12  Deloitte, Medical Tourism: Update and Implications  13  www.usatoday.com; The Top 10 Travel Trends for 2010, 2010