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Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
Children's nutrition guide
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Children's nutrition guide

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  • 1. Your Wellbeing, LLC Children’s Nutrition Guide The following are a list of educational material available to Your Wellbeing, LLC patients. This information (including diet plans) can be found on Your Wellbeing’s health portal under the Diet section tab. Please note that each educational listing is specifically designed to assist a patient’s eating habits based off the correlating condition specified in the diet. These diets may not be used by anyone and everyone. If you have other health related issues that might be affected by our diet plans please contact a doctor for further guidance. FEEDING SOLUTIONS FOR CHILDREN Getting children to eat what is good for them frequently becomes a challenge and all too often turns into a battle ground for control over what to eat, how much to eat, and even when to eat. So many parents agonize over their children’s eating habits. But research has shown that children whose parents are less controlling of their food intake are better able to regulate food intake themselves. This guide is designed to provide you with a great deal of practical nutrition information. If you add to its willingness to compromise, patience, trust, and some humor, you’ll find it is not that hard to get your child to eat right. 1. Plan to eat together. Make family meal time a positive experience by enjoying meals and snacks with your child. Turn the TV off! Meals should involve conversation and laughter as well as nourishment. Keep your mealtimes free of stressful nagging and criticism. 2. Serve meals and snacks on a regular schedule with enough time between meals to build up an appetite. Try to schedule meals before your child becomes overly hungry or irritable. Younger children often need five small meals a day because their stomachs have limited capacity. Plan nutritious snacks as part of the daily meal schedule and discourage large snacks or beverages other than water around mealtimes. This way, your child will be hungry enough to eat with the rest of the family. 3. Provide good selections of healthy foods then allow your child to choose how much he or she will eat. Children will learn to eat healthy foods if those are the foods available. You can’t fill up on cookies if they are not in the cupboard. So keep only foods in your house that you want your kids to eat. Remember you get to control what food is available. Your child controls how much and what he eats. Studies have shown that over time preschool children can and do construct diets with enough calories and nutrients when they are allowed to make their own food choices from a variety of foods. You are teaching them to recognize the internal cues of hunger and satiety (fullness) by letting them decide when they want more and when they’ve had enough to eat. Let your child decide if they are hungry or full. Some days they may seem to eat very little, but they will make up for it by eating more the next day or the day after. These internal cues will help them regulate their food intake and weight for life. 4. Do not classify foods as "good" or "bad". All foods eaten in moderation, even sweets and treats are fine. If you totally forbid sweets, that may cause your child to want them more. By allowing your child to eat what they want at birthday parties and school field trips, they’ll learn that fast-food, candy bars, chips, and soda are foods we eat occasionally. They’ll also learn the important lesson that these foods can occasionally fit into an overall healthy diet. 5. Children need smaller portions than adults. A good rule is to serve kids 1 to 6 years 1 tablespoon of each type of food for every year of the child's age. For example, a three year old's plate might contain 3 tablespoons of chicken, 3 tablespoons of rice, and 3 tablespoons of applesauce.
  • 2. 6. Never insist your child clean their plates. This is not helpful and may be harmful to the child's future eating behaviors. Offer a balanced and tasty diet, but try not to force food choices. 7. Do not use food as reward, punishment, bribe or threat. Food should be a source of nourishment and enjoyment. When we make food into a bribe or reward it elevates the status of food. Bribing your child to eat or taking food away only confuses the natural internal cues of hunger and satiety. Once your child has lost the ability to read his own internal cues he becomes more vulnerable to eating disorders. This can cause kids to eat when they aren’t hungry, but need comfort. Give your child a cookie because it is the dessert for today and not that he has been a good boy. If he cannot have ice cream it should be because it is not available rather than because he did not clean his room. 8. Get your children involved in choosing healthy foods by letting them help you select food at the market. 9. Be a good role model. Children learn by watching you. You owe it to your children and to yourself to improve your own eating habits. Good eating habits that children learn from their parents can develop into lifelong patterns. Some of the most important habits to model: • Eat breakfast - Kids who pick up this important habit from you are more attentive and learn more efficiently at school. • Eat your fruits and vegetables - Let your children see you eating and enjoying fruits and vegetables. • Eat healthy snacks - Eat the snacks you want your kids to eat 10. Remain calm if your child leaves a portion or an entire meal untouched 11. Be realistic. Know when to end a meal so you have harmony rather than screaming. 12. Don’t go overboard. It is to a degree important to keep the fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol at recommended levels in your child’s diet; however, without enough calories and nutrients, your child cannot grow and develop to his full potential. 13. Encourage but don’t force your child to try new foods. If a food is rejected, try not to focus on the situation. The more you focus on the food jag, the longer it may last. Continue to make the rejected food available over the course of several months before declaring the food or dish a disaster. Allow children as well as adults to dislike foods. The following are some guidelines to help introduce new foods to your child: • Offer new foods at the beginning of the meal when your child is really hungry. • Offer foods with kid appeal such as finger foods, food that is cut in animal shapes, and brightly colored fruits and vegetables • Serve a favorite or familiar food with the new food • Offer dipping sauces with the food. Children love to dip their food • Allow hot foods to cool down and cold foods to warm up. Children often dislike extreme temperatures. • Try to serve foods plain-many times the true flavor of foods are overwhelmed with sauces, gravies, syrups, herbs, and spices. • Serve the same food prepared in different ways. Try zucchini sticks one day and zucchini coins the next day.
  • 3. • Mix it up.  Try combining fruit, ice, and milk or yogurt in a blender for a refreshing smoothie you'll both enjoy.  • Involve your child in food preparation. The more that your child is involved in preparing their food; the more likely they are to taste it. • Draw a smiling face on top of a casserole or sandwich using strips of cheese or cutouts of another familiar food. • Encourage a "test bite" of a new food. Do not force them. FEEDING A BABY OR A CHILD WITH DIARRHEA Diarrhea is when there is a sudden increase in the number of loose or watery stools. Diarrhea is usually caused by a virus, which means that it can be highly contagious. Diarrhea can also be caused by a change in the diet, undercooked food, medicine such as antibiotics, or by bacteria (germs) that are passed from other children or adults, sometimes because of unwashed hands. During infancy the most common causes of diarrhea in order of frequency are gastrointestinal infections, colds, food intolerance’s, and antibiotic treatment. In babies diarrhea is most commonly due to intestinal infection called gastroenteritis. The stools of diarrhea from gastroenteritis are frequent, watery, green, mucous, foul smelling, explosive, and occasionally blood tinged. Usually there is a raw red rash around the anus. In addition, the baby often has other signs of a viral infection: a cold or flu. The main concern with diarrhea is dehydration. Your child’s body contains just the right balance of fluid and minerals. Healthy intestines and kidneys regulate this balance. A proper balance is necessary for organs to function. Diarrhea interrupts this balance, causing the body to lose fluid and minerals, which leads to dehydration. Vomiting further increases the risk of dehydration. Without proper care, diarrhea can be dangerous. If the fluid and minerals are not replaced with the proper liquids, the child is in danger of becoming dehydrated and might need to go to the hospital. Dehydration may occur very fast in a baby with diarrhea. Extreme dehydration can cause death. Warning Signs of Dehydration: • Less urination than usual (for a baby that generally means wetting fewer than five to six diapers a day) • Extreme thirst • Fears when crying • Dry mouth • Very cold hands or feet • Extreme fussiness or sleepiness • Sunken eyes (in baby, there may also be sunken soft spot on top of head) Call your pediatrician or nurse practitioner if you think your child is dehydrated. Other Danger signs to watch for during diarrhea: • Fever lasting more than 24 hours • Blood in the stool • Rash or yellow skin • Severe stomach pain • Vomiting lasting more than 12 hours You should call your health professional if the diarrhea lasts more than 24 hours, or if any of the above health problems occur in combination with the diarrhea.
  • 4. Treatment of Diarrhea As soon as the diarrhea starts, give your child plenty of appropriate fluids. Children with diarrhea need to drink more fluids than they drink when healthy. There are special fluids that are better than others for children with diarrhea. An oral electrolyte solution (for example, Pedialyte or Naturalyte) is the fluid you should give to an infant or child with diarrhea. It will put the water and minerals that are lost during diarrhea into your child’s body. This special solution should be used at the first sign of diarrhea. It is recommended to give small and frequent feedings. Keep giving it to your child every 2-4 hours continuing for 24-48 hours until the diarrhea stops. Check with your doctor about the minimum and maximum amount of the solution to give your baby. Oral electrolyte solutions are sold at supermarkets, as well as discount and drug stores. It is available without prescription. It is a good idea to keep an extra bottle of the oral electrolyte solution in your home, since you cannot predict when your child will get diarrhea. • Avoid gelatin, cola, ginger ale, fruit juices (especially pear, apple and cherry), sport drinks, cows milk, broth or sweetened teas, and sugar water • Serve the BRAT diet in severe cases (Banana, Rice cereal, Applesauce, and unbuttered Toast) • Do not starve the diarrhea. As long as your child has an appetite, you should continue to feed your child to ensure good nutrition (a clear liquid diet may itself produce diarrhea). If breast feeding or formula feeding your baby, continue to feed normally. However, do not force feed your child. • If your child continually refuses fluids or food, contact your doctor or nurse, particularly if the child has a fever or has been vomiting for 12-24 hours. • As a general rule, as your baby’s stools become more solid, so may the diet. • Do continue breast feeding-it is rarely necessary to stop breast feeding, since human milk is not irritating, may even be therapeutic and may be the only food and fluid a sick child will take or tolerate. • Avoid boiling solutions, especially milk and sugar, since boiling may cause the water to evaporate, making the solution too concentrated and aggravating the dehydration. When to call your doctor • Dehydration is worsening • Baby has lost more than 5 percent of her body weight • Your child is becoming increasingly lethargic (sleepy) • The fever remains high • The vomiting continues • Baby is having increasingly severe abdominal pains Preventing Diarrhea 1. Avoid giving your child too much juice especially apple, pear and cherry juice. 2. Parents and caregivers must remember to wash their hands often to prevent the spread of germs to their children. Adults should wash their hands before cooking, before feeding their children, after changing diapers, and going to the bathroom. THE TODDLER DIET Purpose: The toddler general diet is designed to promote growth and development of a child aged 12 to 36 months.
  • 5. Use: It is used to introduce foods of different consistency and variety into the child’s diet. Feeding Guidelines Beginning the transition to finger foods/ table foods is generally suggested when a baby is able to sit in a high chair (or somewhere between 7-10 months). Gradually the baby evolves to a toddler who often prefers finger type foods. Toddlers often refuse to be "fed", preferring to feed themselves. Allow your child to experiment with food despite the mess. You may want to use newspaper, a plastic tablecloth, etc. under the high chair. Regardless of age, babies do not need teeth-to chew; gums do an adequate job on soft foods. BE SURE TO OBSERVE YOUR CHILD WHEN YOU OFFER NEW FOODS OR MORE TEXTURED FOODS TO SEE THAT HE CAN HANDLE THEM WITHOUT DIFFICULTY.  Many young children prefer small utensils (cups, spoons, etc.) that are familiar and easier to manipulate until motor skills develop. Serve portions of food according to the age and appetite of each individual child. Small amounts (with second helpings when requested) are more encouraging to a child than over- sized portions. Serve three meals and nutritious snacks. Between meal snacks should be planned so they do not interfere with appetite at mealtimes.  It is best to wait until your baby is over 2 years of age before introducing the following foods. The following foods may cause choking: berries, candies, hot dogs (whole or chunks), raw apples, raw carrots, meat chunks, thick & creamy peanut butter, unripe pears, stringy foods, hard beans, corn (unless creamed), nuts, popcorn, olives, raisins, grapes, hard candy. The following foods may cause allergy: chocolate, cocoa, citrus, egg whites. The following foods may irritate the digestive tract: pastries, fatty foods, highly spiced foods, fried foods, gravies. FINGER FOODS FROM THE FOUR BASIC FOOD GROUPS MILK & DAIRY 4 servings each day • Cheese strips • Grated or shredded cheese (1 ounce) • Cottage cheese, small or large curd (add fresh or canned fruit for interest) • Whole milk • Yogurt (smooth) puddings • Ice Cream • Custard • Pudding • Yogurt FRUIT 2-4 servings each day • Banana, mashed or small slices • Apples, peeled and cut in 1/8ths
  • 6. • Applesauce • Blueberries • Cantaloupe, cut into bite-size pieces • Dried fruits, cut into bite-size pieces –avoid raisins • Fruit cocktail, canned • Grapes, halved • Guava • Honeydew melon, cut into bite-size pieces • Kiwi pieces, peeled • Mandarin oranges, canned • Mango • Oranges, peeled and sectioned • Orange juice, Calcium fortified if milk intake low • Papaya • Peaches, ripe and peeled • Pears, peeled • Pineapple, fresh or canned • Raspberries • Strawberries, halved • Sweet cherries, pitted • Watermelon, pitted and cut into bite-size pieces VEGETABLES 3-4 servings each day • Asparagus tips, cooked • Avocado, ripe • Beets • Broccoli florets, cooked • Brussels sprouts • Carrot sticks, soft cooked or grated, • Cauliflower, cooked • Celery, all strands removed • Cherry tomatoes, halved • Creamed Corn • Eggplant • French-fries • Green Beans, cooked • Kale, cooked • Lettuce, shredded • Mashed Potato
  • 7. • Mushrooms, cooked • Okra pods • Peas • Peppers, green or red bell • Pickle spears • Potato Cubes • Pumpkin, canned, unsweetened • Spaghetti squash • Squash, winter • Sweet potato, cooked and mashed • Tomatoes, peeled • Turnip, diced BREAD & GRAINS 6 or more servings each day • Dry Cereals: Cheerios ®, Kix ®, Puffed Rice, Corn Bran (dry or with milk) • Bagels and cream cheese • Bread sticks • Biscuits • English muffin • Bran muffins graham crackers • Cooked Cereals (baby cereals are more nutritious) • French toast, sliced • Goldfish crackers • Macaroni and other pasta • Oyster crackers • Pancakes • Pita bread, regular or whole wheat • Pretzel rods • Rice, white, brown or wild • Rice cakes, avoid ones containing nuts • Saltines • Sandwiches, broken or cut into small pieces • Toast, lightly buttered and cut into fourths • Triscuits ® • Waffles • Zwieback ® Arrowroot Cookies PROTEIN FOODS 4 servings each day (total of 25 grams) • Beans, (garbanzo, (chick peas), pinto, kidney, navy), cooked until soft and mashed or split for a young toddler)
  • 8. • Bacon, crisp • Eggs, boiled, scrambled, poached or deviled • Gerber meatsticks • Ham, cut into bite size pieces • Hamburger patty • Lamb chops (make sure bone has no sharp points) • Lentils • Luncheon meats • Meatloaf • Sausage • Spareribs, well-cooked, little sauce • Tender fish (no bones) • Tender meat (ground, chopped or cubed) • Tender poultry • Tiny meatballs • Tofu cubes • Tuna fish • Veal COMBINATION & SNACK FOODS • Bean & cheese burrito (cut up) • Beefaroni • Cheese and crackers • Gnocchi, tortellini, ravioli with a variety of fillings • Macaroni and cheese • Macaroni and pastas (try different shapes and colors) • Plain peanut butter on toast or crackers • Quesadilla strips (cheese melted between flour tortillas and sliced into strips) • Ravioli • Spaghetti O's • Spaghetti w/ meat sauce • Spaghetti with meat sauce • Tuna noodle casserole • Pushups • Fruit popsicle THE PRESCHOOLER'S DIET
  • 9. Purpose: The preschooler's (child aged 3-6 years) general diet is designed to promote growth and physical and intellectual development. Use: It is used to continue to introduce foods of different variety into the child's diet. Feeding Guidelines Basic nutritional needs of preschool children are similar to the nutritional needs of other family members. Amounts needed are different because of age. The preschooler's growth is slower than that of an infant. An average child age 3 through 5 will grow about 2 to 3 1/2 inches and gain 3 1/2 to 5 1/2 pounds each year. Because growth rate is slower, appetites slow down as the demand for energy and nutrients decreases. Preschool children are learning to make choices and say "no" as part of the separation process and the development of independence. Food fussiness, erratic food binges and unusual combinations are all part of children's attempts to exercise self-control in their struggle for anatomy. Eating habits formed during these early years are likely to last a lifetime. Introducing variety early on may help to expand your child's dietary repertoire. The preschool period is an excellent time to introduce healthy eating and help them understand that it is part of a healthy lifestyle. The best approach is to select more fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, and less fat and eat a variety of nutrient-rich foods. NOTE: Children should be encouraged but never forced to eat. Food should not be used as a discipline or as a reward. FOODS FROM THE BASIC FOOD GROUPS MILK & DAIRY 2 servings each day Milk and dairy are the body's main source of calcium; riboflavin, protein, zinc, vitamins B12 and D. Foods in this group are good for growth and strong bones. Serving sizes Milk, yogurt, pudding 1 cup Cheese, natural 2 oz Cheese, cottage 1 cup Ice cream, frozen yogurt 1 cup • Cheese (sticks, cubes, slices, or coarsely grated) • Cheese strips • String cheese • Cottage cheese, small or large curd (add fresh or canned fruit for interest) • Whole milk or whole soy milk • Yogurt puddings • Ice cream • Custard • Pudding • Frozen yogurt • Yogurt (plain, plain with fresh fruit, or fruit-sweetened jam added or fruit-sweetened commercial brands) FRUIT 2 servings each day Fruit are major sources of vitamins A and C, potassium, folic acid, soluble and insoluble fiber.
  • 10. Serving sizes Fruit, large (apple, banana) 1 piece Fruit, small, raw (apricot, plum) 1 1/2 pieces Fruit, processed (applesauce) 1/2 cup Fruit juice 3/4 cup Fruit, dried 1/4 cup • All canned, jarred, dried and fresh fruit • Papaya, strawberries, kiwi, orange, grapefruit, cantaloupe, mandarin oranges, mango, honeydew, raspberries, apricots, rhubarb, pineapple, watermelon, blueberries, peach, banana, plum, cherries (pitted), frozen fruit, juice bar, canned fruit (fruit cocktail, etc.), pear, apple, dried fruit, grapes, raisins, guava, applesauce • All fruit juices and nectars (calcium fortified if milk or dairy intake low) VEGETABLES 3 servings each day Vegetables are high in certain nutrients, such as potassium, vitamins A and C and folic acid. Serving sizes Vegetables, cooked or processed 1/2 cup Vegetable juice 3/4 cup Potatoes, mashed 1/2 cup Vegetables, raw leafy 1 cup Vegetables, whole raw 1/2 cup Sauce, tomato 1/2 cup • All canned, fresh and frozen vegetables • Red and green bell peppers, bok choy, spinach, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, cabbage, chard, asparagus, kale, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, snow peas, zucchini, okra, winter squash, green beans, beets, cucumber, celery, jicama, artichoke, peas, mushrooms, eggplant, corn (plain or creamed), avocado, potato (cubed, mashed, boiled), lettuce (romaine, spinach, etc.), spaghetti squash, pumpkin (canned, unsweetened), turnip, pickle spears • Tomato and pesto sauces • All vegetable juices BREAD & GRAINS 6 or more servings each day Foods in this group are a major source of thiamin, niacin, iron, fiber and zinc; and also a vital part of a healthy, balanced diet. Serving sizes Bread 1 slice Cereal, ready to eat 1 oz
  • 11. Cereal, cooked 1/2 cup Rice or pasta 1/2 cup Grits 1/2 cup Crackers 7 • Whole-grain or enriched breads, bagels, tortillas, English muffins, bran muffins, crackers, hamburger/hot dog buns, dinner rolls, biscuits, pita bread, and miniature bagels, bagels • Corn or whole wheat tortillas • Pita bread • Wheat, rye, raisin or white bread • Whole-grain or enriched cooked cereals like oatmeal, oat bran, grits, and cream of wheat • Wheat bran cereals or unsweetened dry cereal such as Cheerios ®, Kix ®, Puffed Rice, Corn Bran (dry or with milk) • Whole-grain or enriched rice, spaghetti, macaroni, or other type of pasta • Orzo and refrigerator pastas in a variety of shapes and colors • Gnocchi, tortellini, ravioli with a variety of fillings • Couscous, barley and bulgur • Millet and quinoa • Wheat germ • Pancakes, French toast, and waffles • Soft or dry pretzels, breadsticks, rice cakes, Melba toast (with nut butter, butter, or plain) • Animal, graham, rye, soda, saltine, whole grain crackers, and oyster crackers (with nut butter, butter, or plain) PROTEIN FOODS 2 servings each day Besides protein meat is a major source of iron, niacin, thiamin, vitamins B6 and B12, folic acid, magnesium, and zinc. Serving sizes Meat, poultry, fish 2-3 oz cooked or 4-5 TB chopped Egg 1 (counts as 1 oz meat) Peanut butter 2 TB (counts as 1 oz meat) Beans, cooked 1/3 cup Nuts 1/2 cup Tofu 2 ounces • Beans, (garbanzo, (chick peas), pinto, kidney, navy) • Eggs, boiled, scrambled, poached or deviled
  • 12. • Lentils • Nut butters (almond, sesame, peanut) for spreading and dipping • Tofu cubes • All fresh, frozen fish and shellfish • Sausage, poultry, ham, veal, hamburger, hotdog • Vegetarian burgers or hotdogs • Other meats such as spareribs, well-cooked, meatballs, meatloaf, luncheon meats, Canadian bacon, Lamb chops (make sure bone has no sharp points) COMBINATION FOODS & SNACKS • Bean & cheese burrito • Bean and cheese burritos • Bagels with nut butter or hummus • Tacos • Noodle or rice casseroles • Egg dishes or egg casseroles • Chicken and dumpling soup, Matzo ball soup • Egg rolls • Pizza • Quesadilla strips (cheese melted between flour tortillas and sliced into strips) • Taquitos • Pasta with marinara sauce with or without meat • Potato pancakes • Macaroni and cheese • Cheese and crackers • Nut butters (peanut, almond or sunflower etc.) on toast or crackers • Raw vegetables with hummus or tofu dip • Pushups • Shakes made with soya milk and fruit • Fruit popsicle • Fruit smoothies • Plain yogurt sweetened with fresh fruit • Fruit sweetened muffins, cookies, and cakes • Fig bars, ginger snaps, vanilla wafers, molasses cookies, angel food cake • Cream cheese with unsweetened jelly on bread or crackers • Tortilla with cinnamon and sugar • Cinnamon toast Purpose: The school aged child (child aged 7-12 years) general diet is designed to continue to promote growth and physical and intellectual development. Use: It is used to continue to introduce foods of different variety into the child's diet.
  • 13. FOODS FROM THE BASIC FOOD GROUPS MILK & DAIRY 3 servings each day Milk and dairy are the body's main source of calcium, riboflavin, protein, zinc, vitamins B12 and D. Foods in this group are good for growth and strong bones. Serving sizes Milk, yogurt, pudding 1 cup Cheese, natural 1 oz Cheese, processed 1 1/2 oz Cheese, cottage 2 cup Ice cream, frozen yogurt 1 1/4 cup • Cheese (sticks, cubes, slices, or coarsely grated) • Cheese strips • String cheese • Cottage cheese, small or large curd (add fresh or canned fruit for interest) • Whole milk • Soy milk • Yogurt puddings • Ice cream • Custard • Pudding • Frozen yogurt • Yogurt (plain, plain with fresh fruit, or fruit-sweetened jam added or fruit-sweetened commercial brands) FRUIT 2-3 servings each day Fruit are major sources of vitamins A and C, potassium, folic acid, soluble and insoluble fiber. Serving sizes Fruit, medium (apple, banana) 1 piece Fruit, small, raw (apricot, plum) 1 piece Fruit, processed (applesauce) 1/2 cup Fruit juice 1/2 cup Fruit, dried 1/6 cup • All canned, jarred, dried and fresh fruit • Papaya, strawberries, kiwi, orange, grapefruit, cantaloupe, mandarin oranges, mango, honeydew, raspberries, apricots, rhubarb, pineapple, watermelon, blueberries, peach, banana, plum, cherries (pitted), frozen fruit, juice bar, canned fruit (fruit cocktail, etc.), pear, apple, dried fruit, grapes, raisins, guava, applesauce • All fruit juices and nectars (calcium fortified if milk intake low)
  • 14. VEGETABLES 2-3 servings each day Vegetables are high in certain nutrients, such as potassium, vitamins A and C and folic acid. Serving sizes Vegetables, cooked or processed 1/2 cup Vegetable juice 1/2 cup Potatoes, mashed 1/2 cup Vegetables, raw leafy 1 cup Vegetables, whole raw 1 cup Sauce, tomato 1/2 cup • All canned, fresh and frozen vegetables • Red and green bell peppers, bok choy, spinach, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, cabbage, chard, asparagus, kale, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, snow peas, zucchini, okra, winter squash, green beans, beets, cucumber, celery, jicama, artichoke, peas, mushrooms, eggplant, corn (plain or creamed), avocado, potato (cubed, mashed, boiled), lettuce (romaine, etc.), spaghetti squash, pumpkin (canned, unsweetened), turnip, pickle spears • Tomato and pesto sauces • All vegetable juices BREAD & GRAINS 7 or more servings each day Foods in this group are a major source of thiamin, niacin, iron, fiber and zinc; and also a vital part of a healthy, balanced diet. Serving sizes Bread 1 slice Cereal, ready to eat 3/4 - 1 cup Cereal, cooked 1/2 cup Rice or pasta 1/3 cup Grits 1/2 cup Crackers 5 • Whole-grain or enriched breads, bagels, tortillas, English muffins, bran muffins, crackers, hamburger/hot dog buns, dinner rolls, biscuits, pita bread, and bagels • Corn or whole wheat tortillas • Wheat, rye, raisin or white bread • Whole-grain or enriched cooked cereals like oatmeal, oat bran, grits, and cream of wheat • Wheat bran cereals or unsweetened dry cereal such as Cheerios ®, Kix ®, Puffed Rice, Corn Bran (dry or with milk) • Whole-grain or enriched rice, spaghetti, macaroni, or other type of pasta • Orzo and refrigerator pastas in a variety of shapes and colors
  • 15. • Gnocchi, tortellini, ravioli with a variety of fillings • Couscous, barley and bulgur • Millet and quinoa • Wheat germ • Pancakes, French toast, and waffles • Soft or dry pretzels, breadsticks, rice cakes, Melba toast (with nut butter, butter, or plain) • Animal, graham, rye, soda, saltine, whole grain crackers, and oyster crackers (with nut butter, butter, or plain) PROTEIN FOODS 3-4 servings each day Besides protein meat is a major source of iron, niacin, thiamin, vitamins B6 and B12, folic acid, magnesium, and zinc. Serving sizes Meat 3 oz. Egg 1 1/2 item Peanut butter, nut or seed butter 2 TB Beans, cooked 1/2 cup Nuts, seeds 2 TB Tofu, tempeh, or TVP 1/2 cup • Beans, (garbanzo, (chick peas), pinto, kidney, navy) • Eggs, boiled, scrambled, poached or deviled • Lentils • Nut butters (almond, sesame, peanut) for spreading and dipping • Tofu cubes • All fresh, frozen fish and shellfish • Sausage, poultry, ham, veal, hamburger, hotdog • Veggie burgers and hotdogs • Other meats such as spareribs, well-cooked, meatballs, meatloaf, luncheon meats, Canadian bacon, Lamb chops (make sure bone has no sharp points) COMBINATION FOODS & SNACKS • Bean & cheese burrito • Instant hummus mix and pita bread • Casseroles • Egg dishes or egg casseroles • Chicken and dumpling soup, Matzo ball soup • Egg rolls • Pizza
  • 16. • Quesadilla (cheese melted between flour tortillas) • Ravioli • Pasta with marinara sauce with or without meat sauce • Potato pancakes • Macaroni and cheese • Nut butters (peanut, almond or sunflower etc.) on toast or crackers • Pushups • Frozen fruit pops • Fruit smoothies • Plain yogurt sweetened with fresh fruit • Fruit sweetened muffins, cookies, and cakes • Fig bars, ginger snaps, vanilla wafers, molasses cookies, angel food cake • Cheese and crackers • Cream cheese with unsweetened or regular jelly on bread or crackers • Tortilla with cinnamon and sugar DIET FOR TEENAGERS Purpose: The teenager's general diet is designed to continue to promote growth and physical and intellectual development. Use: It is used to continue to introduce foods of different variety into the teenager's diet. Feeding Guidelines The years between 13 and 19 are times of especially rapid growth and change. Nutritional needs are high during these years. FOODS FROM THE BASIC FOOD GROUPS MILK & DAIRY 4 servings each day Milk and dairy are the body's main source of calcium, riboflavin, protein, zinc; vitamins B12 and D. Foods in this group are good for growth and strong bones. Serving sizes Milk, yogurt, pudding 1 cup Cheese, natural 1 oz. Cheese, processed 1 1/2 oz. Cheese, cottage 2 cup Ice cream, frozen yogurt 1 1/4 cup • Cheese (sticks, cubes, slices, or coarsely grated) • Cheese strips • String cheese • Cottage cheese, small or large curd (add fresh or canned fruit for interest) • Whole milk • Soy milk • Yogurt puddings
  • 17. • Ice cream • Custard • Pudding • Frozen yogurt • Yogurt (plain, plain with fresh fruit, or fruit-sweetened jam added or fruit-sweetened commercial brands) FRUIT 2-4 servings each day Fruit are major sources of vitamins A and C, potassium, folic acid, soluble and insoluble fiber. Serving sizes Fruit, medium (apple, banana) 1 piece Fruit, small, raw (apricot, plum) 1 piece Fruit, processed (applesauce) 1/2 cup Fruit juice 1/2 cup Fruit, dried 1/6 cup • All canned, jarred, dried and fresh fruit • Papaya, strawberries, kiwi, orange, grapefruit, cantaloupe, mandarin oranges, mango, honeydew, raspberries, apricots, rhubarb, pineapple, watermelon, blueberries, peach, banana, plum, cherries (pitted), frozen fruit, juice bar, canned fruit (fruit cocktail, etc.), pear, apple, dried fruit, grapes, raisins, guava, applesauce • All fruit juices and nectars (calcium fortified if milk intake low) VEGETABLES 3-5 servings each day Vegetables are high in certain nutrients, such as potassium, vitamins A and C and folic acid. Serving sizes Vegetables, cooked or processed 1/2 cup Vegetable juice 1/2 cup Potatoes, mashed 1/2 cup Vegetables, raw leafy 1 cup Vegetables, whole raw 1 cup Sauce, tomato 1/2 cup • All canned, fresh and frozen vegetables • Red and green bell peppers, bok choy, spinach, broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, cabbage, chard, asparagus, kale, Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, snow peas, zucchini, okra, winter squash, green beans, beets, cucumber, celery, jicama, artichoke, peas, mushrooms, eggplant, corn (plain or creamed), avocado, potato (cubed, mashed, boiled), lettuce (romaine, etc.), spaghetti squash, pumpkin (canned, unsweetened), turnip, pickle spears
  • 18. • Tomato and pesto sauces • All vegetable juices BREAD & GRAINS 7-11 or more servings each day Foods in this group are a major source of thiamin, niacin, iron, fiber and zinc; and also a vital part of a healthy, balanced diet. Serving sizes Bread 1 slice Cereal, ready to eat 3/4 - 1 cup Cereal, cooked 1/2 cup Rice or pasta 1/3 cup Grits 1/2 cup Crackers 5 • Whole-grain or enriched breads, bagels, tortillas, English muffins, bran muffins, crackers, hamburger/hot dog buns, dinner rolls, biscuits, pita bread, and bagels • Corn or whole wheat tortillas • Wheat, rye, raisin or white bread • Whole-grain or enriched cooked cereals like oatmeal, oat bran, grits, and cream of wheat • Wheat bran cereals or unsweetened dry cereal such as Cheerios ®, Kix ®, Puffed Rice, Corn Bran (dry or with milk) • Whole-grain or enriched rice, spaghetti, macaroni, or other type of pasta • Orzo and refrigerator pastas in a variety of shapes and colors • Gnocchi, tortellini, ravioli with a variety of fillings • Couscous, barley and bulgur • Millet and quinoa • Wheat germ • Pancakes, French toast, and waffles • Soft or dry pretzels, breadsticks, rice cakes, Melba toast (with nut butter, butter, or plain) • Animal, graham, rye, soda, saltine, whole grain crackers, and oyster crackers (with nut butter, butter, or plain) PROTEIN FOODS 3-4 servings each day Besides protein meat is a major source of iron, niacin, thiamin, vitamins B6 and B12, folic acid, magnesium, and zinc. Serving sizes Meat 3 oz. Egg 1 1/2 item Peanut butter, nut or seed butter 2 TB Beans, cooked 1/2 cup
  • 19. Nuts, seeds 2 TB Tofu, tempeh, or TVP 1/2 cup • Beans, (garbanzo, (chick peas), pinto, kidney, navy) • Eggs, boiled, scrambled, poached or deviled • Lentils • Nut butters (almond, sesame, peanut) for spreading and dipping • Tofu cubes • All fresh, frozen fish and shellfish • Sausage, poultry, ham, veal, hamburger, hotdog • Veggie burgers and hotdogs • Other meats such as spareribs, well-cooked, meatballs, meatloaf, luncheon meats, Canadian bacon, Lamb chops (make sure bone has no sharp points) COMBINATION FOODS & SNACKS • Bean & cheese burrito • Instant hummus mix and pita bread • Casseroles • Egg dishes or egg casseroles • Chicken and dumpling soup, Matzo ball soup • Egg rolls • Pizza • Quesadilla (cheese melted between flour tortillas) • Ravioli • Pasta with marinara sauce with or without meat sauce • Potato pancakes • Macaroni and cheese • Nut butters (peanut, almond or sunflower etc.) on toast or crackers • Pushups • Frozen fruit pops • Fruit smoothies • Plain yogurt sweetened with fresh fruit • Fruit sweetened muffins, cookies, and cakes • Fig bars, ginger snaps, vanilla wafers, molasses cookies, angel food cake • Cheese and crackers • Cream cheese with unsweetened or regular jelly on bread or crackers • Tortilla with cinnamon and sugar • Trail mix

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