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Invisible Narratives: How to Easily and Effectively turn Data into Stories
 

Invisible Narratives: How to Easily and Effectively turn Data into Stories

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Justin Malecki gave this presentation on using data to tell your story at Toronto Net Tuesday in April 2012. You can find a full recap of the event here: ...

Justin Malecki gave this presentation on using data to tell your story at Toronto Net Tuesday in April 2012. You can find a full recap of the event here: http://www.techsoupcanada.ca/community/events/toronto_net_tuesday/data_visualization

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  • As should be painfully obvious
  • This fine print simply says that our results are based on what is told to us by those we interview and that we can’t be held responsible should they choose to deceive us.
  • This fine print simply says that our results are based on what is told to us by those we interview and that we can’t be held responsible should they choose to deceive us.
  • This fine print simply says that our results are based on what is told to us by those we interview and that we can’t be held responsible should they choose to deceive us.
  • This fine print simply says that our results are based on what is told to us by those we interview and that we can’t be held responsible should they choose to deceive us.
  • (first bullet)It has been almost a year since the domestic content requirements have been increased to 60% for CAE FIT and microFIT projects. Nevertheless, PV installers still have a substantial number of 40 and 50% domestic content contracts that have yet to be built.This report addresses the question: What are the domestic content requirements of existing microFIT and CAE FIT contracts that are likely to be built within the next year?(second bullet)This is an important question as it provides insight into both current and future demand for 40 and 50% domestic content equipment(third bullet with sub-bullets)Our survey includes over 65 PV installers in Ontario who we estimate to represent about 48% of the microFIT and CAE FIT market in the province. By asking PV installers themselves about the domestic content requirements of the systems they have been hired to build, ClearSky Advisors is able to provide a unique perspective on those contracts that are most likely to be built and connected.
  • (graph, first bullet; consider showing the axes first and explaining before plotting the data)First, we take a look at the average fraction of contracts requiring 60% domestic content that were held by Ontario installers at the end of August but which have not yet been built. We have segmented installers based on their total installed volume in 2011: the small category includes those who install less than 250 kilowatts in a year, in the medium category we have installers who build between 250 and 1000 kilowatts a year, and the large category includes all of those who install more than a megawatt a year. (second bullet)What we found is that 87% of installers’ contracts require 60% domestic content, meaning that 13% of existing contracts require either 40% domestic content for microFIT projects, or 50% domestic content for FIT projects. However, looking at the right most bar in the graph, we see that, if you are an installer in the large segment, chances are you have more contracts with lower domestic content requirements. This is probably reflective of the fact that large volume installers have a greater number of contracts for more time-intensive larger projects obtained before the domestic content requirements changed. (third bullet)It is important to keep in mind that these fractions represent the number of contracts only and not the volume in kilowatts of those contracts. We take a closer look at how the volume of these existing contracts is divided between the various domestic content requirements in the next slide.
  • (graph, first bullet; consider showing the axes first and explaining before plotting the data)First, we take a look at the average fraction of contracts requiring 60% domestic content that were held by Ontario installers at the end of August but which have not yet been built. We have segmented installers based on their total installed volume in 2011: the small category includes those who install less than 250 kilowatts in a year, in the medium category we have installers who build between 250 and 1000 kilowatts a year, and the large category includes all of those who install more than a megawatt a year. (second bullet)What we found is that 87% of installers’ contracts require 60% domestic content, meaning that 13% of existing contracts require either 40% domestic content for microFIT projects, or 50% domestic content for FIT projects. However, looking at the right most bar in the graph, we see that, if you are an installer in the large segment, chances are you have more contracts with lower domestic content requirements. This is probably reflective of the fact that large volume installers have a greater number of contracts for more time-intensive larger projects obtained before the domestic content requirements changed. (third bullet)It is important to keep in mind that these fractions represent the number of contracts only and not the volume in kilowatts of those contracts. We take a closer look at how the volume of these existing contracts is divided between the various domestic content requirements in the next slide.
  • (graph, first bullet; consider showing the axes first and explaining before plotting the data)First, we take a look at the average fraction of contracts requiring 60% domestic content that were held by Ontario installers at the end of August but which have not yet been built. We have segmented installers based on their total installed volume in 2011: the small category includes those who install less than 250 kilowatts in a year, in the medium category we have installers who build between 250 and 1000 kilowatts a year, and the large category includes all of those who install more than a megawatt a year. (second bullet)What we found is that 87% of installers’ contracts require 60% domestic content, meaning that 13% of existing contracts require either 40% domestic content for microFIT projects, or 50% domestic content for FIT projects. However, looking at the right most bar in the graph, we see that, if you are an installer in the large segment, chances are you have more contracts with lower domestic content requirements. This is probably reflective of the fact that large volume installers have a greater number of contracts for more time-intensive larger projects obtained before the domestic content requirements changed. (third bullet)It is important to keep in mind that these fractions represent the number of contracts only and not the volume in kilowatts of those contracts. We take a closer look at how the volume of these existing contracts is divided between the various domestic content requirements in the next slide.
  • (graph, first bullet; consider showing the axes first and explaining before plotting the data)First, we take a look at the average fraction of contracts requiring 60% domestic content that were held by Ontario installers at the end of August but which have not yet been built. We have segmented installers based on their total installed volume in 2011: the small category includes those who install less than 250 kilowatts in a year, in the medium category we have installers who build between 250 and 1000 kilowatts a year, and the large category includes all of those who install more than a megawatt a year. (second bullet)What we found is that 87% of installers’ contracts require 60% domestic content, meaning that 13% of existing contracts require either 40% domestic content for microFIT projects, or 50% domestic content for FIT projects. However, looking at the right most bar in the graph, we see that, if you are an installer in the large segment, chances are you have more contracts with lower domestic content requirements. This is probably reflective of the fact that large volume installers have a greater number of contracts for more time-intensive larger projects obtained before the domestic content requirements changed. (third bullet)It is important to keep in mind that these fractions represent the number of contracts only and not the volume in kilowatts of those contracts. We take a closer look at how the volume of these existing contracts is divided between the various domestic content requirements in the next slide.
  • (graph, first bullet; consider showing the axes first and explaining before plotting the data)First, we take a look at the average fraction of contracts requiring 60% domestic content that were held by Ontario installers at the end of August but which have not yet been built. We have segmented installers based on their total installed volume in 2011: the small category includes those who install less than 250 kilowatts in a year, in the medium category we have installers who build between 250 and 1000 kilowatts a year, and the large category includes all of those who install more than a megawatt a year. (second bullet)What we found is that 87% of installers’ contracts require 60% domestic content, meaning that 13% of existing contracts require either 40% domestic content for microFIT projects, or 50% domestic content for FIT projects. However, looking at the right most bar in the graph, we see that, if you are an installer in the large segment, chances are you have more contracts with lower domestic content requirements. This is probably reflective of the fact that large volume installers have a greater number of contracts for more time-intensive larger projects obtained before the domestic content requirements changed. (third bullet)It is important to keep in mind that these fractions represent the number of contracts only and not the volume in kilowatts of those contracts. We take a closer look at how the volume of these existing contracts is divided between the various domestic content requirements in the next slide.
  • (graph, first bullet; consider showing the axes first and explaining before plotting the data)First, we take a look at the average fraction of contracts requiring 60% domestic content that were held by Ontario installers at the end of August but which have not yet been built. We have segmented installers based on their total installed volume in 2011: the small category includes those who install less than 250 kilowatts in a year, in the medium category we have installers who build between 250 and 1000 kilowatts a year, and the large category includes all of those who install more than a megawatt a year. (second bullet)What we found is that 87% of installers’ contracts require 60% domestic content, meaning that 13% of existing contracts require either 40% domestic content for microFIT projects, or 50% domestic content for FIT projects. However, looking at the right most bar in the graph, we see that, if you are an installer in the large segment, chances are you have more contracts with lower domestic content requirements. This is probably reflective of the fact that large volume installers have a greater number of contracts for more time-intensive larger projects obtained before the domestic content requirements changed. (third bullet)It is important to keep in mind that these fractions represent the number of contracts only and not the volume in kilowatts of those contracts. We take a closer look at how the volume of these existing contracts is divided between the various domestic content requirements in the next slide.

Invisible Narratives: How to Easily and Effectively turn Data into Stories Invisible Narratives: How to Easily and Effectively turn Data into Stories Presentation Transcript

  • Invisible Narratives:How to easily and effectively turn data into stories Justin Malecki, PhD Analyst/Physicist April 17, 2012
  • OutlinePresentation Outline My experience in data storytelling Key principles for effective data storytelling Principles in action: real-world examples
  • OutcomesBy the end of this presentation, you will… Have seen several varied examples of effective data presentation using simple Microsoft Excel/Word tools Have been introduced to several general principles to help guide you through your own data presentation needs Be more prepared and confident to effectively tell the stories that are hidden in your data
  • Provisos I’m not a designer My graphs aren’t very sexy My approach is old school My graphs are not interactive I’ve never been formally trained for this My approach is very utilitarian: what do I need to do to effectively tell my stories, nothing more.
  • Background & Experience Cosmology
  • Background & Experience Computational Physics
  • Background & Experience ClearSky Advisors
  • Background & Experience ClearSky Advisors
  • Key Principles in Effective Data Storytelling Know your audience o Who is your audience? o How will they read/interact with your story? o How much data do they really need? Know the story/stories you want to tell o What are the key points you want to convey? o What data will you need to tell that story? o Know this before preparing data for presentation
  • Key Principles in Effective Data Storytelling Have your graphics independently tell your story o Is your message conveyed through the graph alone? o Will your audience need to read the text in order to understand the graphs? Only include that which adds to your story o Have you included non sequitur data in your graphs? o Are there any elements of your graphs that distract the reader from the story? o Of each element (e.g. graph type, shapes, colors, textures), ask “Does this help tell my story?”
  • Example 1: Blog Article Know your audience Who is your audience? o Wide range of people working/interested in solar industry How will they read/interact with your story? o Casual, quick reading How much data do they really need? o Not much at all
  • Example 1: Blog Article Know the story you want to tell What are the key points that you want to convey? o New Jersey has surpassed its targets for the amount of solar electricity generation o Those goals will continue to be surpassed until 2016 What data will you need to tell that story? o New Jersey’s solar energy targets 2011-2016 o Current and anticipated solar electricity generation 2011- 2016
  • Example 1: Blog ArticleHave your graphics independently tell your story
  • Example 1: Blog Article Have your graphics independently tell your story Is your message conveyed through the graph alone? o I think so, at least for the intended audience of solar workers Does the reader have to read the text to understand the graph? o Only a little (What’s an “energy year”?)
  • Example 1: Blog Article Only include that which adds to your story Have you included non sequitur data in your graphs? Are there any distracting elements? Of each element, ask “Does this help tell my story”?
  • Example 2: Solar Module Distribution Know your audience Who is your intended audience? o One client wanting to know details of how solar modules (panels) are being distributed through the Ontario supply chain How will they read/interact with your story? o Directly and with great detail o For use in presentation to head office How much data do they really need? o As much as possible 16
  • Example 2: Solar Module Distribution Know the story you want to tell What are the key points that you want to convey? o How many modules are being manufactured and sold o Through what channels are they reaching the end customer What data will you need to tell that story? o The numbers, all of them 17
  • Example 2: Solar Module Distribution Have your graphics independently tell your storyManufacturers Distribution Channel End Market YY* Distributors, Brokers, Dealers MicroFIT CAE FIT YY* 40% DC: XX MW 50% DC: X MW 60% DC: XX MW 60% DC: XX MW Net Supply YY*Serving Ontario YY* Installers/EPCs XXX MW YY* Utility-Scale (RESOP) Developers/EPCs YYY YYY YYY MW 18
  • Example 2: Solar Module Distribution Only include that which adds to your story Is your message conveyed through the graph alone? o Yes Does the reader have to read the text to understand the graph? o No. The only text provided described methodology.
  • Example 2: Solar Module DistributionHave your graphics independently tell your story  Have you included non sequitur data in your graphs?  Are there any distracting elements?  Of each element, ask “Does this help tell my story”?
  • Summary4 Key Principles Know your audience Know the story/stories you want to tell Have your graphics independently tell your story Only include that which adds to your story