Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
 The Business Case For Speed In Digital MarketingThe Business Case forSpeed in Digital MarketingIn this report you will le...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 2ContentsContents................................
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 3A Brief History of SpeedWhen the commercial I...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 4Why Invest In Web Acceleration?Web accelerati...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 5Determinants Of Website Page SpeedPopular bro...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 65. Compress componentsCompress your files at ...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 7The Business Case For SpeedTechnical CaseHow ...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 8Anything over a ten-second delay, and users s...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 9Performance of web and mobile web pages is al...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 10The most important result from these statist...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 11BrowsersYour customers need to use the best ...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 12Financial CaseAny delay is likely to cause a...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 13Tests undertaken at Amazon revealed that for...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 14The abandonment rate is the percentage of vi...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 15PerformanceSo how do the top websites actual...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 16ItalyRank Site Response1. Prada 1.1092. Gucc...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 17Availability of your content is, as we have ...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 18Mobile WebsitesThe modern digital environmen...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 19There is, however, still one big difference ...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 20GermanyRank Site Response1. Ciao DE 8.6652. ...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 21If you are looking to build trust and engage...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 22Impact of InfrastructureSo far this report h...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 23For networks, such as Limelight’s private IP...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 24Acceleration ToolsThere are also web content...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 25- Accelerated Page Rendering – A part of the...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 26The Unique Limelight WebAcceleration Solutio...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 27Don’t keep your online visitors waiting.Lime...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 28The Limelight Video Platform (LVP) is a simp...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 29GlossaryAbandonment The rate at which visito...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 30Content Delivery Network A content delivery ...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 31HTML 5 The latest version of HTML. HTML5 isd...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 32KB Kilobyte – measurement of digitaldata. On...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 33Plug-in A plug-in is an add-on typically for...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 34Web servers This is a computer that runs a w...
www.limelight.com	  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 35SourcesI E-Commerce Page Speed & Website Per...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Speed in digital marketing en

334

Published on

This is a whitepaper I wrote about the need for speed in digital marketing.

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
334
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
7
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Speed in digital marketing en"

  1. 1.  The Business Case For Speed In Digital MarketingThe Business Case forSpeed in Digital MarketingIn this report you will learn:• Best practice for digital content acceleration• Where to find tools to identify your own website’s performance• The available solutions for web acceleration• How front-end acceleration can speed up website downloads on any deviceMay 2012Thom PooleInternational Marketing DirectorLimelight Networks Inc.London Office:+44 (0)207 437 1617Paris Office:+33 (0) 149 973 318Munich Office:+49 89 89058480
  2. 2. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 2ContentsContents........................................................................................2A Brief History of Speed................................................................3Why Invest In Web Acceleration?..............................................4Determinants Of Website Page Speed .....................................5The Business Case For Speed ......................................................7Impact of Infrastructure.............................................................22The Unique Limelight Web Acceleration Solution ..................26Glossary .......................................................................................29Sources ........................................................................................35About Limelight Networks:Limelight Networks, Inc. (Nasdaq:LLNW) is a trusted provider ofintegrated cloud-based applications that leverage Limelight’sscalable, high-performance, global computing platform. We giveorganisations whose Internet, mobile, and social initiatives areabsolutely critical to their success a complete solution to upload,manage, publish, monetise, accelerate, and analyse their online andmobile content. The Limelight team of experts and end-to-end offeringallow customers to streamline all of the processes throughout thecontent lifecycle and optimise the performance of content across allchannels — empowering them to quickly and cost-effectivelyorchestrate a successful digital presence that improves brandawareness, drives revenue, and enhances customer relationships.
  3. 3. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 3A Brief History of SpeedWhen the commercial Internet started in the early 1990’s, no onewas sure what to make of it. In the early days we endured dial-up modems that dropped off every so often. Websites werebasic and relatively small in their footprint. Pages were basicblack on white, Courier typeface and no images.Today we are demanding websites to deliver rich media content– immediately, conveniently and consistently. If a website fails todo this, visitors soon give up!Web pages are getting ‘fatter’, but are also getting faster thanksto faster networks, connections and browsers. Typical retailwebsites download in between 3 to 6 seconds. The ideal is2 seconds.IWhere do you stand?Key Findings1. Customers expect your content –NOW2. Every delay loses conversions,revenue, and customer satisfaction3. Mobile commerce is even moresensitive to network latency4. Content Delivery Network (CDN),network acceleration andpresentation layer optimisationservices are vital5. Reducing download waiting timesis critical to digital satisfaction
  4. 4. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 4Why Invest In Web Acceleration?Web acceleration services are designed to accelerate non-cacheable content and offload objects through cachedstorage if at all possible – and this is still a major technique today.But in this mobile economy – where is close to the user?As the complexity of websites has grown, the potential for delayhas increased. Excessive noise in the media landscape alsomeans many sites are trying to drive more engagement throughpersonalisation, thus creating more opportunities to interact – ifthe user can wait!With so many different browsers, caches, networks, devices andconnection speeds involved in the modern Internet, a single setof HTML optimisations does not fit all eventualities.Your page views, bounce rates, customer conversions, customersatisfaction and, most importantly, profitability, are at stake. This‘Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing’ will demonstratethis.Websiteoptimization.com has found top online brands saying thesame thing.IIGoogle found that moving from a 10-result page loading in0.4 seconds to a 30-result page loading in 0.9 secondsdecreased traffic and advertising revenues by 20%.IIIWhen the home page of Google Maps was reduced from100KB to 70-80KB, traffic went up 10% in the first week, andan additional 25% in the following three weeks.IVAmazon tests revealed that for every 100millisecondsincrease in load time sales decreased by 1%.VIn a study by the Aberdeen Group, a 1 second delay resultsin11% fewer page views; 16% reduction in customer satis-faction and most importantly, 7% loss in conversions. Theycalculated that for a site earning $100,000 per day, the sitecould lose $2.5 million per year in sales.VI
  5. 5. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 5Determinants Of Website Page SpeedPopular browser plugins can highlight key areas of performance.Unfortunately, they only highlight them! Industry recommend-ations to the issues include:1. Minimise the number of HTTP requestsThis means limiting the number of files required to display on yourweb page. This can also mean reducing the size of the pagesand limiting the choices on each page.Files include CSS files, JavaScript references, images, video, etc.Recommendation: eliminate everything that is unnecessary – theextra load-time for a ‘nice-to-have’ may not be worth it.2. Optimise and correctly display imagesThis means making images and video files as small as possiblewithout losing quality. Size them correctly for the device so thebrowser doesn’t have to load and resize content.Many images can contain extraneous metadata downloadedby devices. Compression can also help.3. Minimise HTML, CSS and JavaScriptRemove the white space from your code. It is useful whenprogramming, but servers and browsers don’t care about this,and it just adds time!4. Use a Content Delivery Network (CDN)A CDN will help reduce the load on your servers and turbo-charge the performance by delivering cached objects from anearby server.A CDN is a network of high-performance servers around theworld that cache website assets (code, images, etc.) locally in aPoint of Presence (POP).
  6. 6. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 65. Compress componentsCompress your files at the server level before sending them tothe user. The greater the compression, the smaller the file size,and the faster the download.6. Put style sheets at the top of pagesAll ‘interface-related’ style sheet (CSS) references should beincluded in the <head> of your document. If you have separatestyle sheets, use a <link> command as opposed @import.When the style sheet instructions are in the <head>, customerswill see a styled page from the start – the appearance of yoursite will load first.7. Put scripts at the bottom of pagesAll functionality-related files should be loaded after the content.Let visitors see the content as quickly as possible – if they likethat, they’ll be reading/watching this whilst the functional filesload.Because of the way browsers function, scripts hold up rendertime, whilst the browsers process these scripts. Putting the scriptsat the bottom of the page allows the browser to build the pagefirst.8. Utilise browser cachingUse the browser’s ability to store static files so that the secondand subsequent pages load quicker. This involves instructing thebrowser to hang on to particular files, images, etc.This is part of site coding, not the infrastructure.9. Use CSS spritesA CSS sprite is an image comprising other images used in thepage design. It maps co-ordinates of images on the page tospeed loading.Source: Willie Jackson – willejackson.com
  7. 7. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 7The Business Case For SpeedTechnical CaseHow much do you spend (time, effort and money) on optimisingyour websites for search engines? Google announced that theyconsider speed when determining search engine rankings, so aslow load-time will impact whether you appear on page 1 or10!VIISpeed is vital, as Web accessibility guru, Jakob Nielsen identified.He shows two reasons why responsiveness matters:• Human limitations – especially in the areas of memory andattention. We don’t perform as well if we have to wait and‘suffer’ the inevitable decay of information stored in short-term memory• Human aspirations – we like to feel as though we control ourown destiny rather than be subjugated to a computer’swhims. Also, when companies make us wait instead ofproviding responsive services, they can appear arrogant orincompetent VIIIThere are three response-time limits identified by Nielsen,originating in 1968 but which still hold true:0.1 secondsThis gives a feeling of instantaneous response, as if the user,not the computer, caused it. This level of responsiveness isessential to support the feeling of direct manipulation (one ofthe key GUI techniques to increase user engagement andcontrol).1 secondThis keeps the user’s flow of thought seamless. Users cansense a delay, and thus know the computer is generating theoutcome, but still feel as though they control the overallexperience. This degree of responsiveness is needed forgood navigation.10 secondsThis keeps the user’s attention. From 1-10 seconds, usersdefinitely feel at the mercy of the computer and wish it wasfaster, but this is still manageable.
  8. 8. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 8Anything over a ten-second delay, and users start thinking ofother things, making it harder to get back on track when thecomputer does finally respond. A ten-second plus delay willoften make users leave the site immediately.In a survey carried out in 2011 by the global tag managementcompany – TagMan – over 80% of respondents are concernedor very concerned about their company page load speeds, and60% claim to have undertaken some steps to improve their sitespeed, but feel they could still do more.IXRespondents ranked the impact of slow loading sites as:1. Reduced conversions – 51%2. Visitor abandonment – 46%3. Perceived negative brand experience – 47%4. Reduced repeat visits – 49%5. Switching to competitive sites – 40%6. Other mentions: negative impact on search engineoptimisation (SEO)The measures that the survey found respondents had taken toimprove site speed included:• Optimising page code – 63%• Performance monitoring – 56%• Reducing the page ‘weight’ – 55%• Reducing or removing third-party tags – 35%• Increase the number of web servers/locations – 22%• Site acceleration – 22%• Unsure – 9%• Other – 3%
  9. 9. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 9Performance of web and mobile web pages is also measured interms of the bounce rate – i.e. the number of users who leavethe first page without exploring the page or site in any greaterdetail.This data came from a web acceleration provider – Strange-loop.X Other surveys and studies confirm this – more of that later.There is a dramatic relationship between landing page speed,bounce rate and pages viewed per visit.!!!"#$%&#$()"*+%,The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing Share this report: | Page 9Performance of web and mobile web pages is also measured interms of the bounce rate – i.e. the number of users who leavethe first page without exploring the page or site in any greaterdetail.This data came from a web acceleration provider – Strange-loop.X Other surveys and studies confirm this – more of that later.There is a dramatic relationship between landing page speed,bounce rate and pages viewed per visit.!"#$!"#%!"#&!"#!"#(!!"#($!"#(%!"#(&!"#(!!!)*# +!!!)*# ,!!!)*# -,!!)*# ((!!!)*# (&!!!)*# $$!!!)*#./0123#4563#)7887*32/19*#-(./&,$/,0+1/*&,2.)&,03,#./4$/,5.&,65&&4,:&!"#:,!"#:%!"#:+!"#:$!"#:(!"#!"#(!!!)*# +!!!)*# ,!!!)*# -,!!)*# ((!!!)*# (&!!!)*# $$!!!)*#;7*76/4#<588:/=#7.&6,5&2,8$6$),9.##:+;,03,#./4$/,5.&,65&&4,
  10. 10. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 10The most important result from these statistics is that theconversion rate falls-off at a greater rate.The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing Share this report: | Page 9There is a dramatic relationship between landing page speed,bounce rate and pages viewed per visit.!"#(!!!)*# +!!!)*# ,!!!)*# -,!!)*# ((!!!)*# (&!!!)*# $$!!!)*#)7887*32/19*#:&!"#:,!"#:%!"#:+!"#:$!"#:(!"#!"#(!!!)*# +!!!)*# ,!!!)*# -,!!)*# ((!!!)*# (&!!!)*# $$!!!)*#;7*76/4#<588:/=#7.&6,5&2,8$6$),9.##:+;,03,#./4$/,5.&,65&&4,!!!"#$%&#$()"*+%,The most important result from these statistics is that theconversion rate falls-off at a greater rate.BrowsersYour customers need to use the best browsers to ensure that yourdigital content loads fast. Pages load 29% faster in MicrosoftInternet Explorer 9 than in IE7. Internet Explorer 9 also outperformsGoogle Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.XI!"#$%!&#$%!#$%!(#$%!)#$%!*#$%!+#$%!,#$%#$%,###-.% *###-.% (###-.% &(##-.% ,,###-.%,###-.%++###-.% +"##-.%/01234.501%4673%-+./&01$+.,02)&,32##4+5,67,#2.8$.,92&,19&&8,
  11. 11. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 11BrowsersYour customers need to use the best browsers to ensure that yourdigital content loads fast. Pages load 29% faster in MicrosoftInternet Explorer 9 than in IE7. Internet Explorer 9 also outperformsGoogle Chrome and Mozilla Firefox.XI
  12. 12. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 12Financial CaseAny delay is likely to cause a drop in revenue – it’s just likequeuing at a checkout, but without being able to see any otherfree or shorter checkouts?The Aberdeen Group identified that a drop in business perform-ance begins after a mere 5.1 seconds delay.For every one-second delay over the perceived average, acompany can expect the following loss of performance:1-second delay in page load time7% loss in customer conversions11% fewer page impressions (probablywith an associated increase in bouncerate)16% drop in customer satisfactionSource: Aberdeen GroupXIIThe Aberdeen Group also identified that an increase in dynamicweb content and the emergence of ‘Web 2.0’ applicationshave an impact on the web performance in a number ofdifferent ways.
  13. 13. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 13Tests undertaken at Amazon revealed that for every 100ms delayin load time, sales revenue decreased by 1%. Using the 7% figurefrom the Aberdeen report amounts to an annual loss of US$2.5million for sites that earn $100,000 per day.XIIIThe loss in conversion rate is probably the most worrying foronline marketers. Conversion rate is the ratio of visitors whoconvert from a casual content view or visit into the desiredaction.When the page-load time increases, likely conversion rates dropby 6.7%, peaking at approx. 2 seconds. If we look at this from theother point of view – every second longer that a web pagetakes to download, the higher the chance of pageabandonment.XIV!!!"#$%&#$()"*+%,The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing Share this report: | Page 12Tests undertaken at Amazon revealed that for every 100ms delayin load time, sales revenue decreased by 1%. Using the 7% figurefrom the Aberdeen report amounts to an annual loss of US$2.5million for sites that earn $100,000 per day.XIIIThe loss in conversion rate is probably the most worrying foronline marketers. Conversion rate is the ratio of visitors whoconvert from a casual content view or visit into the desiredaction.When the page-load time increases, likely conversion rates dropby 6.7%, peaking at approx. 2 seconds. If we look at this from theother point of view – every second longer that a web pagetakes to download, the higher the chance of pageabandonment.XIV!"!#!!$"!#!%"!#!%$"!#!&"!#!&$"!#!"!#!$"!#!("!)%" %)&" &)" )(" ()$" $)%!" %!)&!" &!)!" !)(!" (!)$!"*+,-./01+,"/23."4.001+,"5-./26."726."8+29":1;."<0.=>"-+./&01$+.,02)&,34,52&,#+26,7%&,
  14. 14. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 14The abandonment rate is the percentage of visitors that start the‘sales funnel’ (conversion process) but fail to complete it.Download SpeedsAs web pages increase in size, download speeds are shown tosuffer, even if the static information is cached.First view of a web page in 2010 tookan average of 11.21 seconds.The second (and subsequent) viewtook 5.21 secondsFirst view in 2011 was 10% faster thanthe previous year, mainly thanks toacceleration techniquesThe second view took 6,6 seconds –20% slower than the previous year.According to Alexa.com, the top ranked sites are slower thanthe rest due to requesting, on average, 21 more resources. Thetop 100 sites took 4% longer than the top 2000.XVBecause the sites are requesting up to 35% more resources, thismust mean that they are employing some other forms ofacceleration to make up for it.!!!"#$%&#$()"*+%,The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing Share this report: | Page 13The abandonment rate is the percentage of visitors that start the‘sales funnel’ (conversion process) but fail to complete it.Download SpeedsAs web pages increase in size, download speeds are shown tosuffer, even if the static information is cached.First view of a web page in 2010 tookan average of 11.21 seconds.The second (and subsequent) viewtook 5.21 secondsFirst view in 2011 was 10% faster thanthe previous year, mainly thanks toacceleration techniquesThe second view took 6,6 seconds –20% slower than the previous year.According to Alexa.com, the top ranked sites are slower thanthe rest due to requesting, on average, 21 more resources. Thetop 100 sites took 4% longer than the top 2000.XVBecause the sites are requesting up to 35% more resources, thismust mean that they are employing some other forms ofacceleration to make up for it.!"#$"#%!"#%$"#&!"#&$"#!"#$"#(!"#($"#%# &# # (# $# )# *# +# ,# %!#-./0#12.3#450#67089#-&.,/0&,1.023+2%&2),
  15. 15. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 15PerformanceSo how do the top websites actually perform across Europe? Wehave focused on the retail sector, as the economic pitfalls aremost acute.United KingdomRank Site Response(secs)1. Tesco UK 0.6922. BizRate 0.7503. IKEA UK 0.916Average 2.188GermanyRank Site Response1. Mercateo DE 0.7352. Preisroboter DE 0.8103. Alternate DE 0.855Average 2.341FranceRank Site Response1. Amazon 1.0762. Voyage-SNCF.com 1.2403. Darty 1.394Average 3.017SwitzerlandRank Site Response1. Team Viewer 0.5732. Prixmoinscher 0.7633. LeShop 0.918Average 2.596NetherlandsRank Site Response1. GSMweb.nl 0.3372. Arcandor AG 0.3493. Kijkshop.nl 0.628Average 2.148
  16. 16. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 16ItalyRank Site Response1. Prada 1.1092. Gucci 1.7153. Replay 1.718Average 3.193DenmarkRank Site Response1. Apple Denmark 1.1912. IKEA 1.2993. Cappelendamm 1.461Average 3.120FinlandRank Site Response1. IKEA 1.0762. Boozt.com 1.3033. Ellos 1.349Average 3.209NorwayRank Site Response1. IKEA 1.6952. Apple 1.7473. Cappelendamm 2.111Average 3.232SwedenRank Site Response1. Komplett 0.9162. Expert International 0.9613. ValueClick Inc 1.141Average 2.782Source: Gomez BenchmarkingCollected: March 01, 2012 - April 01, 2012 / 0:00 - midnight EST
  17. 17. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 17Availability of your content is, as we have seen, very important,but availability is not just related to the download speed of eachpage. If you are using a hosting company, or data centre thathas poor performance, your site could be down when yourcustomers are looking for you.Looking at the popular ecommerce brands, any downtimecauses an eye-watering potential loss:Amazon.com – Could lose nearly $1 million per hour if downXVIGeneral Financial Company - $100,000 per hour (52.3% of FScompanies)XVIIeBay - $90,000 per hour (based on a 22 hour outage)XVIIIGeneral Network - $42,000 per hourXIX
  18. 18. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 18Mobile WebsitesThe modern digital environment has changed considerably fromone where we were all tied to our desks, to one where mobility isthe order of the day.In 2000, mobile websites using WAP technology werecumbersome and graphically and interactively light. With theadvent of new technology and smartphone handsets, the onlineexperience of a pocket-sized device can rival many‘computers’.The launch of the Apple iPhone, and latterly the iPad hasexploded the smartphone and tablet markets. By 2011, themarket for ‘PC tablets’ was said to have touched $35.3 billion.According to InSat research, tablets, notebook PC’s andsmartphones are set to see a compound annual growth rate of25.7% until 2015. The mobile [only] market is projected to see8.7% growth in the same period.XXSmartphones account for the smallest share of the globalmarket, but the largest share of mobile web usage – somethingthat is only set to grow as tablets and ‘mobile computing’expands.Mobile Browsers XXI
  19. 19. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 19There is, however, still one big difference in the patience of users.Given that a mobile handset is such a personal item, delays indownloading content is an even greater inconvenience than ona ‘computer’. Coupled with this is the fact that many mobilenetworks charge extra for data downloads, so wasted time alsomeans wasted money when customers abandon their pages!Source: KISSmetric Infographic XXIIPage abandonment is even more prevalent for mobile websites,with most responses to a Gomez survey saying that they wouldwait 6-10 seconds before abandoning the page completely.Mobile web performances are as follows:United KingdomRank Site Response1. Nextag 3.2182. Shopping UK 3.2793. Carphone Warehouse 3.506Average 6.603!!!"#$%&#$()"*+%,The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing Share this report: | Page 18There is, however, still one big difference in the patience of users.Given that a mobile handset is such a personal item, delays indownloading content is an even greater inconvenience than ona ‘computer’. Coupled with this is the fact that many mobilenetworks charge extra for data downloads, so wasted time alsomeans wasted money when customers abandon their pages!Source: KISSmetric Infographic XXIIPage abandonment is even more prevalent for mobile websites,with most responses to a Gomez survey saying that they wouldwait 6-10 seconds before abandoning the page completely.Mobile web performances are as follows:United KingdomRank Site Response1. Nextag 3.2182. Shopping UK 3.2793. Carphone Warehouse 3.506Average 6.603!"# $"# %!"# %$"# &!"# &$"# !"# $"#()**#+,-.#%#*)/0.1#%2$#*)/0.1*#32%!#*)/0.1*#%%2%$#*)/0.1*#%32&!#*)/0.1*#&!4#*)/0.1*#56-.10.7).+#8-+)#-+.$#&,/0&1,234&5*&,
  20. 20. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 20GermanyRank Site Response1. Ciao DE 8.6652. Idealo DE 8.9033. NexTag DE 9.005Average 17.994FranceRank Site Response1. Fnac 1.5982. Amazon 3.7883. Darty 9.062Average 25.581Source: Gomez BenchmarkingCollected: March 01, 2012 - April 01, 2012 / 0:00 - midnight ESTPsychological CaseThe reason that people abandon slow loading web pages isdown to the frustration that the computer/network is in control.This is even worse when there is a lack of feedback on why thedelay is occurring.A survey showed that 43% of narrowband users were preparedto wait more than six seconds for their content to load – that is50% more than broadband shoppers.XXIIIA phrase that another study coined was the ‘Tolerable WaitTime’ (TWT), which found that abandonment of non-working linkswithout feedback peaked at 5-6 seconds. Adding feedback,such as a progress bar, increased the TWT to an average of 38seconds.XXIVSlow response times not only lead to page abandonment, butslow web pages have also been shown to be perceived ashaving lower credibility,XXV and quality.XXVIWhen page load-times are ‘tolerable’, users are less frustrated,which leads to higher conversion rates.XXVII Wait time is, of course,also dependent on the contents – personalised or not. Peoplewill wait slightly longer for information that they believe ispersonalised for them.
  21. 21. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 21If you are looking to build trust and engagement with yourcustomers, do not ignore the psychology of your digitalmarketing.
  22. 22. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 22Impact of InfrastructureSo far this report has discussed how website design, coding andmanagement can speed delivery. Another area that affectsspeed is the infrastructure that delivers your website and pagesto your end customers.Infrastructure for ‘content delivery’ involve:• Hosting environments• The middle mile• The last mile• Acceleration tools• Content delivery networksHostingThe first important choice is the hosting environment. Choosingthe wrong ISP or data centre can impact on your availabilityand deliverability. With the advent of cloud storage, yourcontent can now be placed ‘closer’ to the end user.The diagram below shows the traffic flow of data across first,middle and last mile, via numerous networks. Whilst this can beefficient at times of low traffic, it is also clear that there areplenty of opportunities for congestion and latency.!!!"#$%&#$()"*+%,The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing Share this report: | Page 21Impact of InfrastructureSo far this report has discussed how website design, coding andmanagement can speed delivery. Another area that affectsspeed is the infrastructure that delivers your website and pagesto your end customers.Infrastructure for ‘content delivery’ involve:• Hosting environments• The middle mile• The last mile• Acceleration tools• Content delivery networksHostingThe first important choice is the hosting environment. Choosingthe wrong ISP or data centre can impact on your availabilityand deliverability. With the advent of cloud storage, yourcontent can now be placed ‘closer’ to the end user.The diagram below shows the traffic flow of data across first,middle and last mile, via numerous networks. Whilst this can beefficient at times of low traffic, it is also clear that there areplenty of opportunities for congestion and latency.!"#!"#!"#$%&()%*%+,+-.)/0()%1)%$%&()%*%+,+-.)/0()%1)%223.0)4,)2+5)6+,789-&:8+5+()40;<#=+,70>=;;#0%)?@)(8(0A-40>B;=+,706A8)-CD0A-40:ACE)806&((0C&5:A%)408&0223.0:%+1A8)0-)8&%E0"6&0:A,)0%)-4)%08+5)!-C%)A()0A/A-4&-5)-8F)C%)A()0+-0%)1)-@)BA:+408+5)08&0AC8+&-0F)C%)A()0+-0A/A-4&-5)-8!-C%)A()0+-0%)1)-@)<AC7)A/6)0C&-8)-8F)6+1)%)40G%&50)4,);<#H!#08@-+-,08)C7-+?@)(0%)(@68(0+-087)0%)4@C8+&-0+-0>B;0A-40>=;;#0%)?@)(8(0%@--+-,0&1)%0223.0:%+1A8)0-)8&%E3&-0&:8+5+()40;<#$)8))-0&%+,+-0A-40223.0:%&ID;%A-(:A%)-802+5)6+,780JCC)6)%A8+&-0:%&IDK5:6&D(0;<#0A-40=;L20&:8+5+(A8+&-08)C7-+?@)(M=+,76D0&:8+5+()4A-40:%+&%+8+()40ACC)6)%A8)404)6+1)%D0&1)%087)06A(805+6)N+(+/6)0K6)5)-8(!-1+(+/6)0K6)5)-8(
  23. 23. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 23For networks, such as Limelight’s private IP, the traffic has a lesscongested ‘middle mile’, reducing the number of requests andimproving the speed of delivery and increasing customersatisfaction. This method also prevents loss of service throughfailure or attack on a single server within the infrastructure.Middle MileThe ‘middle mile’ is the segment of a telecommunicationsnetwork linking a network operators core network to the localnetwork plant.XXVIII Middle mile facilities can range from a fewmiles to a few hundred miles. They are often constructed of fibreoptic lines, but microwave and satellite links can be used aswell.XXIX It is shown in the diagram, previous page, as the ‘cloud’.The middle mile is something most content delivery networks(CDN) can control, unless they use the public network. Networksusing the public, as opposed private IP networks in this middlemile could suffer from ‘seasonal fluctuations’, or where twonetwork companies don’t rate traffic efficiently.Last MileThe ‘last mile’ is a term for the final leg of delivering connectivityfrom a communications provider to a customer – it is not anabsolute measurement of distance! It is the connection the enduser has to the ‘Internet’ network (or middle mile infrastructure) –normally through the local telephone exchange. Manymeasurements are limited to measuring the network speeds, anddo not reflect the last mile impact of connectivity.!!!"#$%&#$()"*+%,The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing Share this report: | Page 22For networks, such as Limelight’s private IP, the traffic has a lesscongested ‘middle mile’, reducing the number of requests andimproving the speed of delivery and increasing customersatisfaction. This method also prevents loss of service throughfailure or attack on a single server within the infrastructure.Middle MileThe ‘middle mile’ is the segment of a telecommunicationsnetwork linking a network operators core network to the localnetwork plant.XXVIII Middle mile facilities can range from a fewmiles to a few hundred miles. They are often constructed of fibreoptic lines, but microwave and satellite links can be used aswell.XXIX It is shown in the diagram, previous page, as the ‘cloud’.The middle mile is something most content delivery networks(CDN) can control, unless they use the public network. Networksusing the public, as opposed private IP networks in this middlemile could suffer from ‘seasonal fluctuations’, or where twonetwork companies don’t rate traffic efficiently.Last MileThe ‘last mile’ is a term for the final leg of delivering connectivityfrom a communications provider to a customer – it is not anabsolute measurement of distance! It is the connection the enduser has to the ‘Internet’ network (or middle mile infrastructure) –normally through the local telephone exchange. Manymeasurements are limited to measuring the network speeds, anddo not reflect the last mile impact of connectivity.!"#!"#!"#$%&()%*%+,+-.)/0()%1)%$%&()%*%+,+-.)/0()%1)%223.0)4,)2+5)6+,789-&:8+5+()40;<#=+,70>=;;#0%)?@)(8(0A-40>B;=+,706A8)-CD0A-40:ACE)806&((0C&5:A%)408&0223.0:%+1A8)0-)8&%E0"6&0:A,)0%)-4)%08+5)!-C%)A()0A/A-4&-5)-8F)C%)A()0+-0%)1)-@)BA:+408+5)08&0AC8+&-0F)C%)A()0+-0A/A-4&-5)-8!-C%)A()0+-0%)1)-@)<AC7)A/6)0C&-8)-8F)6+1)%)40G%&50)4,);<#H!#08@-+-,08)C7-+?@)(0%)(@68(0+-087)0%)4@C8+&-0+-0>B;0A-40>=;;#0%)?@)(8(0%@--+-,0&1)%0223.0:%+1A8)0-)8&%E3&-0&:8+5+()40;<#$)8))-0&%+,+-0A-40223.0:%&ID;%A-(:A%)-802+5)6+,780JCC)6)%A8+&-0:%&IDK5:6&D(0;<#0A-40=;L20&:8+5+(A8+&-08)C7-+?@)(M=+,76D0&:8+5+()4A-40:%+&%+8+()40ACC)6)%A8)404)6+1)%D0&1)%087)06A(805+6)N+(+/6)0K6)5)-8(!-1+(+/6)0K6)5)-8(
  24. 24. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 24Acceleration ToolsThere are also web content acceleration tools – they come intwo broad varieties:• Network acceleration – this improves the long-haul non-cached content• Presentation layer acceleration – FEA technology toimprove the server to browser communication.Content Delivery NetworksA CDN can increase the speed of page downloads by providingmore efficient content delivery.The fact that research shows CDN-powered site to be slowercould be caused by the fact that sites using CDN’s contain morecontent than lower ranked sites. The latter may not use CDN’sbecause their pages are more lightweight, with fewer objects,images, etc.CDN’s provide methods to optimise content delivery, and coverthree broad areas:- Reducing Page Requests - By limiting the number of ‘Get’requests for a particular page, delivery is improved. This can bein terms of streamlining the request processes that a webpageneedn’t fetch scripts sequentially, but including the scriptcorrectly in the page code.This is called ‘inlining’ and can be an automated function withinFEA solutions. Other techniques that may help include:• Selective image combining• Just-in-time image loading, for example when scrolled orresized• Small image imbedding• Small JavaScript file embedding• HTML 5 persistent cache using localStorage to create adedicated cache• HTML 5 adaptive cache – a scriptable cache toconsolidate page resources
  25. 25. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 25- Accelerated Page Rendering – A part of the front-end orpresentation layer acceleration (or optimisation) process isdeciding on the loading priority of the different elements of thepage. Browsers will, by default, download page resourcesindiscriminately. By ordering this, the FEA improves the time to thepoint where the page is visibly loaded in an end-user browser.What is your content prioritisation in the display of the HTMLpage? FEA solutions often have the ability to postpone therendering time of certain page elements, including promotingcertain elements from third party sites. In addition to analysingthe order in which objects load, acceleration solutions may alsoutilise the following techniques to accelerate page rendering:• Domain sharding: serves resources across multiple domainsto increase simultaneous connections• Image prefetching: pulling important images before theyare requested by the end user browser• Response prediction: helps to speed rendering byanticipating the HEAD section of the HTML before theserver has dynamically generated the page• Asynchronous JavaScript Execution: processes scriptswithout blocking other page resources.• Asynchronous CSS: unblocks the CSS from holding up theloading of other page objects.• Lazy load: postponing images below the browser fold fromloading until the user scrolls down.- Reducing Page Sizes - From 2003 to 2011 the average webpage grew from 93.7K to over 679K, equating to a 7-foldincrease. During the same eight-year period, the number ofobjects in the average web page more than tripled, going from25.7 to 85 objects per page.Longer term statistics show that since 1995 the size of theaverage web page has increased by 48 times, and the numberof objects per page has grown by nearly 37 times.XXX
  26. 26. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 26The Unique Limelight WebAcceleration SolutionLimelight Accelerate combines both Dynamic Site Accelerationfunctionality for improving non-cacheable, dynamic websiteswith network acceleration and advanced cache controlfunctionality.For maximum content offload, the Front-End Accelerationcapability addresses presentation layer optimisation todynamically apply best practices to the HTML pages in aseamless fashion.The Limelight CDN offers customers access to a private IPnetwork – one of the largest in the world, with Points of Presence(POP) strategically placed around the globe. This provides anunencumbered path back to the customer’s origin in support ofdynamic content retrieval.The CDN provides not only storage capacity at the networkedge, but also processing power. Combined, the CDN andFront-End Acceleration offer a powerful combination to delivercontent in the fastest manner possible to your end users bycaching common reference objects and optimising non-cacheable content back to the origin. Unlike other CDN-onlysolutions, FEA picks up where CDN’s leave off the server tobrowser communication to improve the end user’s perceivedwebpage load time.The scalable, elastic cloud-based service expands on traditionalnotions of content delivery, building on content caching’scrucial role to deliver even bigger acceleration gains at the endof the delivery chain — the web browser. It’s a proven approachthat has helped Limelight’s clients increase engagement,reduce abandonment, and extend their web experiences tomobile devices.
  27. 27. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 27Don’t keep your online visitors waiting.Limelight acceleration technology can also make decisionsbased on the browser that’s requesting content. Since differentbrowsers handle HTML rendering differently, the instructionsdelivered to a Chrome browser, for example, should be differentfrom those delivered to an Internet Explorer window.The type of browser also matters. Mobile browsers have to factorin the constraints of available screen real estate, hardwareprocessing power, and bandwidth connectivity. LimelightAcceleration Services have the power to consider all thesevariables — optimising for every user and every device in realtime.The Limelight suite of content delivery solutions allows seamlessintegration of the FEA and CDN, along with the Limelight VideoPlatform and Dynamic Site Platform. APIs allow easy integrationinto a wide variety of other platforms and corporate systems,giving you maximum flexibility in your digital marketingexecution.www.limelight.comDon’t keep your online visitors waiting. With Limelight Accelerate, they can take immediate action on yoursite—while the same page has barely started to load without Limelight Accelerate.Limelight acceleration technology can also make decisions based on the browser that’srequesting content. Since different browsers handle HTML rendering differently, theinstructions delivered to a Chrome browser, for example, should be different from thosedelivered to an Internet Explorer window. The type of browser also matters. Mobilebrowsers have to factor in the constraints of available screen real estate, hardwareprocessing power, and bandwidth connectivity. Limelight Acceleration Services have thepower to consider all these variables—optimizing for every user and every deviceLimelight Accelerate provides key differentiators that allow both your regular and mobileusers to experience faster web performance:Optimizes dynamic content all the time, every time, while other solutions must learnover time. This is not good for optimizing dynamic content.No plugins at the origin server or browserNo changes to any HTML codeIntegrated into a powerful and robust cloud platformLimelight owns the optimization code and is not dependent on third party developerresourcesConclusionAs websites continue to become more complex—with more and more objects, images,and scripts—the greatest opportunity for web acceleration lies with the browser. Thechallenge for an IT or web administrator is to consistently optimize their site for everybrowser variation. Automated web acceleration solutions can give you the performanceyou need—allowing you to deliver content at warp speed, across every device.To find out how Limelight acceleration solutions can help you increase your webpage rendering performance:
  28. 28. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 28The Limelight Video Platform (LVP) is a simple video publishingtool on the surface, that provides a depth of sophisticatedmetadata management, seamless integration with your existingCMS, real-time analytics, in-video search, and full support formultiple publishing models including free, subscription, and ad-supported video.LVP is used by many of the world’s largest broadcasters –traditional and digital, to deliver store, manage and deliver theiraudio-visual materials.The Limelight Dynamic Site Platform (DSP) combines webcontent management; site marketing and personalisation tools,mobile publishing, and an express solution to help anorganisation be sophisticated web publishers and marketers. Itbenefits from a simplified interface and powerful workflow tools,you can quickly push a wide range of content to your website -or launch new websites quickly using existing assets.The private, global fibre-optic IP network adds to your deliverysuccess and security. Limelight is a cloud-based SaaS provider,and as such you are always on the best version of the platform,future-proofing your investment and able to support yourplanned seasonal events and short-notice campaigns.Limelight Accelerate provides key differentiators that allow bothyour regular and mobile users to experience faster webperformance:• Optimises dynamic content all the time, every time, whileother solutions must learn over time, because manywebsites are very dynamic, competitive solutions thatnever approach their optimised state. This is not good foroptimising dynamic content.• No plug-ins at the origin server or browser• No changes to any HTML code at their origin• Integrated into a powerful and robust cloud platform• Limelight owns the optimisation code and is notdependent on third party developer resources
  29. 29. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 29GlossaryAbandonment The rate at which visitors abandon theweb page, shopping cart, or action.Bounce rate The rate at which a visitor ‘bounce off’a web page without viewing anyfurther pages.Broadband In this sense, a technical term for ‘fast’Internet connectivity – the opposite of‘Narrow-band’ or ‘Dial-up’ connect-ivity.Browser The interface used by the visitor toview web pages – be it on acomputer, tablet or mobile device.Cache A high-speed storage buffer, generallywithin the central processing unit of acomputer, or in commercial storage,within the servers.Cascading Style Sheets Cascading style sheets (CSS) are usedto format the layout of Web pages.They can be used to define text styles,table sizes, and other aspects of Webpages that previously could only bedefined in a pages HTML.XXXICDN see Content Delivery Network (abbr.)Chrome The Google branded Internet browser.Cloud Computing Cloud computing is a general term foranything that involves deliveringhosted services over the Internet.These services are broadly divided intothree categories: Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Platform-as-a-Service(PaaS) and Software-as-a-Service(SaaS). The name cloud computingwas inspired by the cloud symbol thatsoften used to represent the Internet inflowcharts and diagrams.XXXII
  30. 30. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 30Content Delivery Network A content delivery network (CDN) is aninterconnected system of computerson the Internet that provides Webcontent rapidly to numerous users byduplicating the content on multipleserver s and directing the content tousers based on proximity. CDNs areused by Internet service providers(ISPs) to deliver static or dynamic Webpages but the technology is especiallywell suited to streaming audio, video,and Internet television (IPTV)programming.XXXIIICSS see Cascading Style Sheets (abbr.)Customer conversion The customer conversion rate isprobably the most important numberyou should know about your website.You can calculate this number bytaking the number of people whoactually buy something from your site,and then divide by the total numberof unique visitors to your site.XXXIVFEA see Front End Acceleration (abbr.)Firefox The Mozilla branded Internet browser.Front End Acceleration A specific deployment of a proxyserver that optimises web pages byapplying heuristics to improve theserver to browser communications.GB Gigabyte – measurement of digitaldata. One gigabyte is equivalent to1,073,741,824 bytes. (abbr.)Graphic User Interface A graphical user interface (GUI) is ahuman-computer interface (i.e., a wayfor humans to interact with computers)that uses windows, icons and menusand that can be manipulated by amouse (and often to a limited extentby a keyboard as well).XXXVGUI see Graphic User Interface (abbr.)HTML HyperText Markup Language – theprogramming language of the Internet(abbr.).
  31. 31. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 31HTML 5 The latest version of HTML. HTML5 isdesigned to provide a comprehensiveapplication development platform forWeb pages that eliminates the needto install third-party browser plug-inssuch as Java and Flash. It providessupport for 2D graphics, documentediting, drag and drop, browser historymanagement, video playback andlocal file storage.HTTP HyperText Transfer Protocol - theunderlying protocol used by the WorldWide Web. HTTP defines howmessages are formatted and trans-mitted, and what actions Web serversand browsers should take in responseto various commands (abbr.).IE see Internet Explorer (abbr.).Internet Explorer The Microsoft branded Internetbrowser, the latest is version InternetExplorer 9 (IE9).Internet Service Provider The means by which Internet users canaccess the World Wide Web. An ISPhas the equipment and the telecom-munication line access required tohave a point-of-presence on theInternet for the geographic areaserved. The larger ISPs have their ownhigh-speed leased lines so that theyare less dependent on the tele-communication providers and canprovide better service to theircustomers.IP Network Internet Protocol Network - IP hasbecome the global standard fornetworking, which includes the entireInternet, private LANs and many of thedata and voice networks of thecarriers.ISP see Internet Service Provider (abbr.).JavaScript A coding language that can interactwith HTML source code, enabling Webauthors to spice up their sites withdynamic content.
  32. 32. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 32KB Kilobyte – measurement of digitaldata. One kilobyte is equivalent to1,024 bytes (abbr.).Landing page A landing page is the first page avisitor ‘lands’ on went accessing thewebsite. This can be a generic page,or a specific page for a campaign orevent.Last Mile The last mile is the notional distancebetween the user’s device (computeror mobile device) and the ‘network’.Traditionally this has been the linkbetween the user and the local tele-phone exchange or mobile celltransmitter.MB Megabyte – measurement of digitaldata. One megabyte is equivalent to1,048,576 bytes (abbr.).Middle Mile The "middle mile" is the segment of atelecommunications network, whichconnects a network operators corenetwork to the local network plant.Middle mile facilities provide relativelyfast, large-capacity connectionsbetween the network backbone (orbackhaul) and last mile connection.XIXms Milliseconds - one thousandth of asecond (abbr.).Narrowband Generally, narrowband describestelecommunication that carries voiceinformation in a narrow band offrequencies. Recently it is used todescribe slow Internet connections viaa dial-up modem.Page weight The ‘weight’ is the page file size. Theheavier the weight, the larger the sizeand therefore the more the visitor mustdownload/transfer.Page views The number pages the visitor hasaccessed (and assumed to haveviewed.
  33. 33. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 33Plug-in A plug-in is an add-on typically for asoftware programme that addsfunctionality to it. For example, abrowser plug-in allows you to playcertain multimedia files within yourWeb browser.Point of Presence On the Internet, a Point of Presence(POP) is an access point from oneplace to the rest of the Internet. A POPnecessarily has a unique InternetProtocol (IP) address.XXXVIPOP see Point of Presence (abbr.).SaaS see Software-as-a-Service (abbr.).Search Engine Optimisation The art of optimising a website toappear high in the search enginerankings – abbreviated as SEO.SEO see Search Engine Optimisation(abbr.).Software-as-a-Service This is a software distribution model inwhich applications are hosted by avendor or service provider and madeavailable to customers over a network,typically the Internet. It is popular asthe software is constantly updated,and reduces the capital expenditureof a business.Style Sheet see Cascading Style Sheets.WAP see Wireless Application Protocol(abbr.).Web 2.0 Web 2.0 is the term given to describe asecond generation of the World WideWeb that is focused on the ability forpeople to collaborate and shareinformation online. Web 2.0 basicallyrefers to the transition from static HTMLWeb pages to a more dynamic Webthat is more organised and is based onserving Web applications to users.XXXVII
  34. 34. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 34Web servers This is a computer that runs a website.Using the HTTP protocol, the webserver delivers web pages to browsersas well as other data files to web-based applications. The web serverincludes the hardware, operatingsystem, web server software, TCP/IPprotocols and site content (Webpages, images and other files).XXXVIIIWireless Application Protocol This is a specification for a set ofcommunication protocols tostandardise the way that wirelessdevices, such as cellular telephonesand radio transceivers, can be usedfor Internet access, including e-mail,the World Wide Web, newsgroups,and instant messaging.XXXIX© 2012 Limelight Networks, Inc. All rights reserved. Limelight Networks is a registered trademark of Limelight Networks,Inc. Other products and company names may be trademarks of their respective companies. All services are subject tochange or discontinuance without notice. January 2012Key Takeaways1. Web content speed is a key metric for businesssuccess2. Improving the webpage download experienceleads to better engagement, customersatisfaction and higher revenues3. Multi-platform delivery complicates theworkflow but increases reach (to smartphones,tablets and PC’s) and engagement4. Use of end-to-end content delivery systemsimproves performance
  35. 35. www.limelight.com  The Business Case for Speed in Digital Marketing | Page 35SourcesI E-Commerce Page Speed & Website Performance – Strangeloop Networks 2012II Jackson, W. www.williejackson.comIII Linden, 2006IV Farber, 2006V Kohavi & Longbotham, 2007VI Aberdeen Group – The performance of Web Applications: Customers are won or lostin one second, November 2008VII Jackson, W. www.williejackson.comVIII Nielsen, J. useit.com Alertbox June 21, 2010IX Ecommerce Page Speed Survey – TagMan (www.tagman.com) July 18, 2011X Beheshti, H – Strangeloop, July 1, 2010XI E-Commerce Page Speed & Website Performance – Strangeloop Networks 2012XII Customers are Won or Lost in One Second – Simic, B – Aberdeen Group, November2008XIII Kohavi, R & Longbotham, R – Online Experiments: Lessons Learned. September 2007XIV Strangeloop Networks website blog - 2012XV Alexa.com analysis of website load speedsXVI NVT, 2008XVII Nextslt.orgXVIII Internetnews, 1993XIX Gartner, 2003XX http://www.istockanalyist.com/finance/story/5654129/tablet-pc-growth-a-death-knell-for-desktop-pcXXI from WebPerformanceToday.comXXII How Loading Time Affects Your Bottom Line – Inforgraphic from KISSmetrics.com.XXIII JupiterResearch presented by Akamai, 2006XXIV Nah, F – A Study On Tolerable Waiting Time: How Long Are Web Users Willing ToWait?, 2004. From Web Optimization – 30 May 2008XXV Fogg, B.J., et al. – What Makes Websites Credible? A Report On A LargeQuantitative Study. From Web Optimization – 30 May 2008XXVI Bouch, A.,Kuchinskey, A., and Bhatti, N – Quality s in the Eye of the Beholder:Meeting Users’ Requirements for Internet Quality. From Web Optimization – 30 May2008XXVII Akamai – Boosting Online Commerce Profitability…” 2007XXVIII Wikipedia - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_mileXXIX About.com Broadband - http://broadband.about.com/od/glossary/g/Middle-Mile.htmXXX http://www.websiteoptimization.com/speed/tweak/XXXI http://www.techterms.comXXXII http://searchcloudcomputing.techtarget.comXXXIII http://whatis.techtarget.comXXXIV http://www.thesitedoctor.comXXXV http://www.linfo.orgXXXVI http://searchtelecom.techtarget.comXXXVII http://www.webopedia.comXXXVIII http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia_termXXXIX http://searchmobilecomputing.techtarget.com

×