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Marketing for Websites
 

Marketing for Websites

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Presentation given to the University of Surrey - May 2008

Presentation given to the University of Surrey - May 2008

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  • The Meta Description is a vital marketing tool. This is your advert for encouraging visitors to link to your website from a search engine listing. Many people fill the description with keywords in the attempt to increase the ‘keyword footprint’, but ends up providing searchers with random words that may miss the point. Other sites ignore the description altogether, and the 1st paragraph of the website (normally the navigation) is used instead.
  • Keywords used to be all powerful in SEO, but due to years of abuse, their importance has been reduced. Use keywords that are found in the content, and try not to repeat words or phrases, as this is seen as spamming the engine. This includes puralising words, displaying them in upper and lower case, etc. It is better to repeat the words in the content, than in the keywords. The next generation of search engine algorithms will be more intelligent about repetitive use of phrases with minimal changes. It is also likely that the Keywords will find a further reduction in their importance.
  • Keywords should appear in the content, and you can make them more relevant by emphasising them, either in italic or bold typeface. The words that appear here are the most important in SEO. But it is VITAL that the content reads well in the language in which it is written. Adding extraneous words as additional keywords can leave a text almost unreadable. Websites are marketing communications tools, and the marketing department/directors should have overriding control of what the content is, and what the objectives of the page should be.
  • This can be problematic if the links are ‘buttons’. If they are images, the alternative text element should contain all the relevant information 1) for the search engines and 2) for the disabled visitors.
  • Determining Visitor Worth: Determining how much each website visitor is worth is vital to the success of your pay per click advertising campaign. If it costs $50 in click-throughs to make a $40 sale, the campaign has failed. The formula is relatively simple, but some specific historical data is necessary. In the most rudimentary form, it is the profit from the website over a given period divided by the number of total visitors for the same period. If a site netted $1000 in profits from goods or services in a given period, and there were 2,000 visitors during the same period, each would theoretically be worth 50 cents (profit divided by visitors). But this is only the breakeven point. Depending on the desired profit margin, the optimal price to pay per click would probably be something much less than 50 cents. Popular keyword phrases can often run more than this, so it then makes sense to bid less money on less popular terms to pay an acceptable amount per visitor. Selecting Keyphrases: As with typical search engine optimization, keyword research is critical to the success of pay per click advertising. Unlike typical search engine optimization, there aren't practical limits on the number of phrases to target. Usually, there is no extra cost to add as many keyword phrases as possible. This makes the keyword selection process easier, since there is not a good deal of resources committed to optimizing a site for a particular keyword set. Under-performing keywords, while still an annoyance, do not cost extra in pay per click advertising (except for the time involved in setting up the account). To help identify keyword phrases, Yahoo has a tool on their site that allows advertisers to see how often particular search terms are actually typed in their engine. It also gives out popular suggestions based upon the terms you enter. Writing descriptions: With a typical search engine description, the object is to entice as much traffic into a site as possible in the hopes of converting that traffic into customers. With pay per click advertising, a different approach is mandated. It is undesirable to pay for unlikely prospects, so the description is designed to eliminate the "tire kickers" while attracting highly targeted traffic. For this reason, the description should describe exactly what the business offers- a company wouldn't want to pay for every visitor looking for "insurance" if they only sold renter's insurance, for example. At the same time, proven marketing copy techniques should be employed to insure that the description is enticing enough to attract ideal prospects. Monitoring and Analyzing: It is crucial to the success of your pay per click advertising campaign that it be monitored regularly, since positions can and do change every day. Since the top three Yahoo or Google AdWords results are what typically show up on most partner engines (some display more), the competition for these spots can be fierce, and bidding wars are common. If the price gets too high, it is usually prudent to withdraw and pursue a different keyword (the only way to really "lose" a bidding war is to pay too much for each visitor!). Apart from position monitoring, it is important to track and analyze the effectiveness of individual keyword phrases on a monthly basis. Viewing click-through rates and studying visitor habits can lend valuable insight into their motivations and habits, and help to further refine a pay per click advertising campaign.
  • Appropriate settings - daily budget; language; country/regions; ad distribution options Proxy measurement - request for information, arriving at a certain page on your site…
  • Measure General ROI; Campaign ROI; Advert ROI; Keyword ROI Aggressive = Growth (at any cost) or Profitability; or somewhere in between Click through - does not annoy; confuse or distract users from the main goal of your website
  • Show when it counts. Adjust your campaign to consider user peak times. If your target audience is primarily searching for your products between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. on weekdays, then only show your ads during these times. Within its "Edit Campaign Settings" Google has a handy option called Ad Scheduling, which allows you to automatically turn your campaigns on and off at specific times. What's more, if there is a peak time of day when your customers tend to search then you can even up the budget at that time and lower it at others. Choose keywords carefully. Various tools will help find specific keywords or phrases that are being used by your audience. You can pay to use tools such as Keyword Discovery, but a free and easy way to find out is to use Google's Keyword Tool (accessible when you're logged in to AdWords). To use it, you type in your term and the tool instantly gives you variations people have searched for, a rough idea of the number of searches, the advertising competition against those terms, and, if you add a max CPC, an estimate of the position and cost for each term. Select longer tail terms. Another useful aspect of the Google keyword tool is that it can help you find Longer Tail terms. Longer Tail terms are ones that appeal to users searching for very niche or specific items. For example, a generic term from the B2B world would be 'valve'. A Long Tail term would be 'pneumatic pilot valve'. If your budget is limited, it is worth avoiding the high cost generic terms and trying to pick up traffic from people doing very specific searches. Not only will the CPC be significantly cheaper, but you'll tend to find that prospects know exactly what they want, and the quality and number of inquiries resulting from the clicks will be much higher. Go negative to be positive. Staying with Keywords—think negative! A lot of keywords are included in B2B, B2C, and general social searches. Appearing in the results for anything other than your target market is a waste of time and potentially a waste of money. Adding negative keywords is an ideal way to exclude your campaigns from areas that are not relevant to you and enquiries you cannot fulfill. For example, if your company sells power tools but you don't rent them, then words like "rent," "hire," or "lease" would be your negative keywords. Think seasonal. Some products are going to be more or less popular depending on certain times of the year due to holidays, weather, or major events. If your business sells seasonable products, it may be worth upping your spend in the months leading up to these high-demand times to reap the extra traffic…and profits. To the same effect, if seasonal keywords are not part of your core business, focus your energy elsewhere until the excitement (and bid price) decreases. Ad copy is key. You've spent ages picking quality keywords and setting up your campaigns and hopefully now your CPC ad appears high on the Search Engines…you're there in front of your potential customers, so don't fall at the last hurdle. Ad copy is one of the single most important components in differentiating you from your competitor. To help improve your copy, try Google's Dynamic Keyword Insertion Tool. Automatically adding the keyword someone searched for into the ad copy is an easy way to ensure relevancy in the eyes of both Google and users, but is no longer the most effective. This is a trick that many people already know and it is therefore overused. Try to use distinctive, even quirky, verbiage to catch your prospect's eye. Include a major call to action; if you have a unique selling proposition or new offer, say so. Back it up. Don't think of your other promotions, be they offline or online, as separate entities. People may see your print ad, for example, and remember the creative and the product you're selling but not your company name. If they typed your latest marketing slogan into a search engine, would a recognizable CPC ad appear for your company taking them to your site for more information? If not, then you could be missing out. Likewise, the only thing they may remember from your print ad or trade show booth is your company name, so make sure your ads are appearing when someone is searching for you by name (and don't just bank on your company appearing on the first page of organic results). Go vertical. Google AdWords allows you to display your ads across their content and partner networks. However, the content network is not always great for the B2B market, as it relies on Google understanding the contextual content of pages and then only bringing your ad back on the pages that are relevant. To make ads more effective, you can specify the sites you wish your adverts to appear on by creating a placement targeted campaign. Another option for reaching a more focused, relevant audience is vertical search engine advertising. Because of their more segmented nature, vertical search engines reach a very targeted audience, and often produce far better quality traffic at the same or smaller spend levels than you'll find with their general search engine counterparts. Go local versus international. Is your business local or international? If it's international, you may need to set up campaigns on a country by country basis and tailor your keywords and ads to the various languages, time-zones, product variations, specific landing pages, etc. Also, determine your business's capabilities. If you can only deliver locally, there is no point displaying your ads to the whole US. Google allows you to target your ads (based on users' IP addresses) to a named state or town, a radius around a specific location, or even a specified geographic area of your choice. Use CPC management tools (Google AdWords). In addition to Google's keyword tool, there are two others that are particularly helpful. The first is AdWords Editor. It's a free tool that offers you great control over multiple and/or large campaigns. The benefits include uploading bulk campaigns and keywords, making multiple changes to any part of the campaign, getting stats across all campaigns, etc. The second tool is Google's Search Query Performance Reports. These reports show you what people are searching for to trigger your ads, which you can then use to adapt both your CPC words and the content on your site for SEO.
  • 1. Have the call to action follow naturally and build upon what you've already said in the written material. This will reinforce your message and explain why a customer should follow the call to action. For example: "Now that you've seen the benefits of our product, call our toll-free number today for more information." Or use a question such as: "Why continue using inferior products when you can gain all the benefits described in this brochure? Call today for more information." 2. The message should always be specific. Avoid vague suggestions. Use concrete terms and descriptions, such as: "Save $5 on your purchase today," as opposed to: "Save on your purchase today." 3. Use power words to convey urgency. Power words include: "free" (most marketing pros agree this is the strongest word you can use in an ad), "limited time offer," "only a few left," "one-time special offer," "free trial this week only," "buy one get one free," etc. Customers may not completely believe that they have to act immediately or lose their opportunity, but mentioning a time limit makes a call to action more compelling. 4. When you want a customer to take a certain action, be specific: "Get out your credit card and call now," "Turn to our order page," "Fill out the enclosed form and mail it with your check today" or "Click here." 5. Companies wishing to convey a conservative marketing image (financial institutions, professional organizations, sellers of high-ticket luxury items, etc.) may want to avoid calls to action that give an impression of "hype" or high-pressure sales. Examples of conservative, prudent calls to action that do not sacrifice strength: "Call our toll-free number to speak with one of our experienced representatives." "Call today and we'll show how you can safeguard your family's future." 6. Readers tend to be drawn to a P.S. at the end of a letter or other written offer. Many readers will read a P.S. just to make sure they're not missing something. Use a P.S. to make a strong, conclusive call to action.
  • In-company development Training undertaken as part of a planned, in-company development scheme Promotion and appraisal - recognition will be given for your development within an organisation for which up to 8 hours may be claimed Project work - company specific projects to recognise the interaction between marketing and other business disciplines in support of the organisation’s strategy. For example, cross-organisational working, launch of a new website or new market entry plan Contribution to the community Our national, regional, branch and industry group committees/working parties Committees of other marketing organisations Job related committees outside your own organisation, eg trade association Society contributions such as charity work and School Governor

Marketing for Websites Marketing for Websites Presentation Transcript

  • Marketing for Websites How does digital marketing fit into modern business? Example: Search Engines © Jack Marketing Solutions 2008 All rights reserved
  • Agenda
    • Introduction
    • Search Engine Optimisation
      • Workshop exercise
    • Search Engine Marketing
      • Workshop exercise
    • Marketing Careers
  • Why me?
    • Web & digital marketing trailblazer in international, blue chip companies since 1992
    • Taught digital marketing for 9 years
      • e-Commerce
      • Web design for marketers (and the terrified!)
      • CRM
    • Written papers on ‘Data Privacy’, ‘The Marketing Art of the Opt-in’ and ‘Trust in Business and Marketing’
    • Written a book on ‘ethical digital marketing’ called ‘Play It By Trust’
    • Held senior marketing positions at O2, Black & Decker and Hilti
    • A Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Marketing, and Chartered Marketer. Former Chairman of the West Surrey branch & member of the South East Regional Committee
    • Consultant & business mentor for digital marketing strategy and implementation
  • Digital Marketing Introduction © Jack Marketing Solutions 2008 All rights reserved
  • What is Digital Marketing
    • Website marketing
      • External
      • Search Engine Marketing
      • Internal
    • E-mail marketing
    • SMS marketing
    • Internet Kiosks
    • IPTV
  • Digital Marketing
    • Digital marketers undertake:
    • Web design projects
    • Digital marketing compliance
      • Accessibility (DDA)
      • Privacy (DPA)
    • Customer databases (Customer Relationship Marketing - CRM)
    • E-mail/SMS campaign management
    • Integrated campaign management
  • E-Business is…
    • E-promotion
      • Websites
      • E-mail & SMS marketing
      • IPTV & iDTV
    • E-commerce
    • E-distribution
    • E-new product development (NPD)
    • E-marketing research
    • E-learning/training
    • E-tracking
  • Possible careers
    • Online or e-Marketing Manager
    • E-campaigns manager
    • Web marketer
    • E-mail marketer
    • Digital strategist
    • Mobile marketer
    • IPTV marketer
  • Search Engine Optimisation Optimising for free listings © Jack Marketing Solutions 2008 All rights reserved
  • Search Engines
    • Search engines use algorithms to rank websites for people searching for certain words
    • The algorithm criteria are kept very secretive and changed regularly
    • The main search engines are:
      • Google
      • MSN Live
      • Yahoo!
      • Ask
  • What are they?
    • A programme that searches documents for specified keywords and returns a list of the documents where the keywords were found
    • Although search engine is really a general class of programmes, the term is often used to specifically describe systems like Alta Vista and Excite that enable users to search for documents on the World Wide Web and USENET newsgroups
    • Typically, a search engine works by sending out a spider or robot to fetch as many documents as possible
  • What are they?
    • Another programme, called an indexer , then reads these documents and creates an index based on the words contained in each document
    • Each search engine uses a proprietary algorithm to create its indices such that, ideally, only meaningful results are returned for each query
  • Factors
    • Page title (the title in the blue banner at the top of the browser screen
    • Document name and folder/location name
    • Keywords (Meta tag)
    • Description (Meta tag) – this is the short description used by the search engines
    • Content or body text
    • First sentence of the page
    • Link popularity (how popular is your website, i.e. who links to it)
    • The URL or domain name/address
    • H1 title codes (headings)
    • H2 title codes (and so on, if relevant)
    • Same site link text and URLs
    • Outbound link text and URLs
    • Image alternative text tags (Alt tags) – these explain the picture for unsighted visitors, including the robots.
    • HTML comment tags – where applicable, but not so as to spam the search engines
    Search engines look at a number of factors:
  • More factors
    • Document/website inception date
    • Content updates/ changes
    • Query analyses
    • Link based criteria
    • Anchor text
    • Traffic
    • User behaviour
    • Domain name information
    • Ranking history
    • User maintained/ generated data
  • Search Engine Optimisation
    • Search engine optimisation or SEO is the optimisation of a website to return as high a page ranking as possible on a particular or all search engines
    • It involves the following tasks:
      • Design (ensuring the design of the page and navigation assists the robots)
      • Programming (ensuring the code assists the robots)
      • Copywriting (ensuring the page copy is appealing to visitors and robots alike)
      • Marketing (ensuring the website fulfils it’s sales and marketing objectives)
      • Analytics and patience (it is time consuming and does not provide immediate results)
  • Web page titles
    • All web pages should have a page title, this is not the document name
    • Page titles should be informative and help orientate the visitor
    • Page titles, if well constructed, help with Search Engine Optimisation
  • Page titles Tips:
    • Use your website or brand name
    • Make it meaningful and readable
    • Do not repeat the same title on numerous pages
    • Tell visitors where they are in the website
  • Corporate logos
    • Most logos appear in the top, left-hand corner
    • Logos link back to the home page of a website
    • If you have a button, or link to the home page, you can ignore this rule
    • If the logo is not in that location, make it clear where and what the logo is
  • Logos
  • Navigation
    • Navigation should be easy to understand and to follow, whether you use buttons or just text links.
    • You can use 'roll-over' images that change as you move the mouse over it, creating some added interest, but these are cosmetic
    • Primary navigation should never change
    • Good navigation helps visitors and search engines
  • Example www.jack-marketing.com
  • Document name
    • If the document or file name, and folder name matches the search term, this will add to the ranking
    • Try to avoid abbreviations (especially uncommon ones)
  • Meta tags
    • Meta tags are code that the browser sees
    • Search engines also use this information
    • The most important meta tags are:
      • Title (as we have seen)
      • Page description
      • Page keywords and phrases
  • Meta description
    • The description is part of the coding of a page
    • These should be factual and concise
  • Meta keywords
    • The keywords are part of the coding of a page
    • These should be factual and should not be repeated
  • Page contents
    • Use the same terms and spelling (check all spelling!)
    • Make sure your keyword appears in the content
    • Do not put text in pictures
  • 1st sentence
    • Ensure that your first sentence of text is relevant
    • It could be a title, or navigation - make it meaningful
  • Your URL
    • Make sure your URL is something relevant
    • Some search engines do not like composite words
    • Do not make it too long - it may cause spelling mistakes
  • Anatomy of a URL
    • The maximum length for a domain name is 63 characters and the minimum length three characters
    • Before you register a domain name, you ought to make sure that you are not infringing anybody else's rights
    www. surrey .ac.uk { Host name { Second level Domain name { Top level Domain name .co.uk - United Kingdom .com - International commercial .de - Germany .ch - Switzerland .tv - Tuvalu .net - International network .org - International non-profit .name - International personal
  • Heading 1
    • Use the style headings - H1 is the top and should be used once at the top of the page
    • Split the content up with headings and sub-headings
  • Heading 2
    • Use H2, H3, H4 … headings for sub headings throughout your page
  • Same site links
    • Use the terms in the text links e.g. Marketing >>
    • Reinforce the keywords, where relevant
  • Outbound links
    • You will benefit from outbound links to other sites that also use the keyword
    • Do not have too many outbound links- this affects your PageRank 
  • Link popularity
    • How many other websites link to your site?
    • Are they relevant sites, and do they have a higher ranking?
    • Google's PageRank  is part of the algorithm that the huge search engine uses to define an website's importance in a specific search. The rank is based on a score from 0 to 10 where zero in the lowest score and 10 is the highest. You can see the rough/rounded page rank in Google's toolbar. Lately there have been some issues that gave me pause, hinting to me that there may be an unfair human element that can manually change the PageRank  for a specific website.
  • TrustRank
    • Google is considering a new measure
    • TrustRank™ is a new feature just about to be rolled out by Google
    • A high PageRank™ can be achieved by being linked from large numbers of other sites
    • If the sites are less reputable, or have a dubious background, the ‘Trust’ element is missing
    • Sites that ‘sell’ their goodwill may lose out in this ranking
  • Image ‘Alt Tags’
    • Alt tags are ‘Alternative text tags’ and explain what a picture is
    • They are important for accessibility
    • They can help with your search engine ranking
    JMS Header 1 - Digital hand
  • 6 search engine tips
    • Good content is essential - make sure you are providing the perfect source for the search engine by using ‘alignment’ strategy
    • Have a link building strategy that gets great sites to link to you, but do not use link farms!
    • It has never been more important to have good hosting company and ISP for your site
    • Never, ever, spam the search engine
    • Success doesn’t happen overnight
    • Be careful when adding links, and changing structures
  • Driving traffic
    • Search engines are only one method of driving traffic
    • You can use traditional advertising
    • Your business cards
    • Your buildings, vehicles, etc
    • Blogs, newsgroup postings, etc
    • Word of mouth
    • Newsletters (including e-newsletters)
  • Measuring traffic
    • Know approximately who is visiting the site
    • When they visit?
    • What they are visiting?
    • How long they are visiting?
    • What keywords are driving them to the site?
    • How many pages are they viewing?
    • Are they buying, or registering?
  • Google Analytics
  • Optimisation exercise Now for you to do some work © Jack Marketing Solutions 2008 All rights reserved
  • Optimisation exercise
    • You have 30 minutes to:
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/phrases for the ‘page’
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    30
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    29
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    28
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    27
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    26
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    25
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    24
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    20
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    19
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
    15
  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise
    • Write a description for a company/brand of your choice (approx. 200 characters or 4 lines)
    • Write at least 30 keywords/ phrases for the ‘page’
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  • Optimisation exercise 5
  • Optimisation exercise 4
  • Optimisation exercise 3
  • Optimisation exercise 2
  • Optimisation exercise 1
  • Search Engine Marketing Paying to drive traffic © Jack Marketing Solutions 2008 All rights reserved
  • What is it?
    • A PPC ad usually consists of a heading, a short summary and the URL which is the landing page you have selected
    • Some PPC search engines strictly control and monitor the title and description you can use in your ad while others are more open to the type of ad you can place
    • In some cases, once you have devised your PPC ad, decided on the amount you are willing to bid and lodged your application with the PPC search engine, your ad will appear within minutes, other PPC search engines may take a couple of days for your ad to appear
  • What is it?
    • Paying for ‘advertising space’ on the search engines
    • Related to the keywords/phrases entered
    • Listed under ‘Sponsored Links’ at the top, or side of the page
    • Can help achieve page 1 exposure for websites that are otherwise unable to appear there
    • You pay only for an action - not the display
  • Definition
    • Search engine marketing, or SEM, is a form of Internet marketing that seeks to promote websites by increasing their visibility in search engine result pages (SERPs). According to the Search Engine Marketing Professionals Organization, SEM methods include: search engine optimisation (or SEO), paid placement, and paid inclusion.
    • Source: Wikipedia
  • SEM options
    • Affiliate marketing
      • Banner adverts, etc
      • Get paid for referring visitors
      • Or pay to get others to refer them
    • Pay-per-click (PPC)
      • Google AdWords, Yahoo! (Overture) & MSN (Microsoft adCenter)
      • Paying for a top search engine listing
      • Writing copy for a short advert
  • Pay-per click (PPC)
    • Three main companies - Google, Yahoo (Overture) and MSN
    • You pay for each click through - not for the display of your advert
    • Appears as the ‘Sponsored Links’
    • Useful if your site cannot appear high
    • Don’t waste your money if you are at the top
    • Estimated spending in Europe - $3.5 billion by 2010 (Forrester Research - Europe’s Search Engine Marketing Forecast 2004-2010 - Omwando)
  • Advantages of PPC advertising
    • It requires no changes to a current site's content or look to obtain top positions, just a willingness to pay
    • The implementation of a pay per click advertising campaign is relatively quick
    • The implementation of pay per click advertising is relatively easy and does not necessarily require any specialised knowledge
  • Limitations of PPC advertising
    • New bids can lower the positions of other firms, and many will react by raising their bid to regain a previous ranking
    • Monitoring of positions becomes crucial
    • Pay per click advertising can also become prohibitively expensive, depending on the competitiveness of the keyword phrases and the aggressiveness of the competition
    • Many of the "savvier" search engine users have learned to recognise pay per click results as paid advertising and bypass them without consideration
  • How to develop a PPC campaign
    • Define your goals
      • Website exposure
      • Traffic
      • Registrations
      • Bookings/orders
      • Revenue
      • Combination of above
    • Design for personas
      • Your target audience
    • Understand the DMU & buying process
    • Target
      • Geo-demographics
      • Age, gender, etc
  • Your PPC campaign
    • Keyword selection
      • Look for high traffic words (more popular words are more expensive)
      • The keyword price is set by auction (popular words, times of day, territory are more expensive)
      • You can set ‘negative words/phrases’
    • Compelling advert copy
      • You have few words to play with
      • You can optimise the copy
    • Landing page
      • You do not need to use your homepage
      • Relate it to your call to action
      • Develop a bespoke page for your campaign
  • The process
    • Target your customers
    • Determining the visitor value
    • Selecting Keyphrases
    • Writing descriptions
    • Monitoring and analysing
  • Setting up Google AdWords
  • AdWords - Stage 2
  • AdWords - Stage 3
  • AdWords campaign launch
    • Optimisation
      • A/B Testing (multiple variations > make changes singularly > monitor every step of the conversion)
    • Bidding
      • Tools - there are keyword bidding tools across multiple PPC providers
      • Strategies - what is your goal, e.g. 1,000 orders? This is a campaign and should therefore be focused
    • CPA/CPC conversion
      • You may not be spending much on your PPC, but what is your Cost per Acquisition (CPA)?
  • CPA/CPC conversion Source: Online Marketing - Damani, R., Damani, C., Farbo, D. & Linton, J. £6.00 £5.00 £4.00 £3.00 £2.00 5% £7.50 £6.25 £5.00 £3.75 £2.50 4% £10.00 £8.33 £6.67 £5.00 £3.33 3% £15.00 £12.50 £10.00 £7.50 £5.00 2% £30.00 £25.00 £20.00 £15.00 £10.00 1% £0.30 £0.25 £0.20 £0.15 £0.10 Site Conversion Cost per Click (CPC)
  • Example - Google AdWords
  • AdWords campaign checklist - 1
    • Do you have your campaign settings set appropriately for your business?
    • Is your campaign well labelled & organised logically?
    • Have you figured out how to measure success?
    • Where sales are infrequent, can you measure a proxy?
    • Do you have a plan to systematically test ad copy?
    • Are you following the editorial rules?
    • Are your bids too high or too low?
  • AdWords campaign checklist - 2
    • Have you a plan for ongoing keyword discovery?
    • If keywords are persistently disabled, are you doing enough to rectify this?
    • Are you tracking your ROI on everything?
    • Are you adjusting your campaign based on your ROI data?
    • Do you know how aggressive you want to be?
    • Do you keep a consistent message to reinforce your brand?
    • Is the click through - to site exit a smooth process?
    Source: Winning Results with Google AdWords - Andrew Goodman
  • Tracking your keywords
  • PPC media differences
    • Google AdWords and MSN are postpay and Yahoo (Overture) is prepay
    • The minimum for words on Yahoo is £0.10, on Google & MSN it is £0.01
    • You can set your maximum bid, and your daily maximum
    • With Google, you can track your conversions and other traffic with Google Analytics
  • Click fraud
    • When a PPC advert is clicked by a human or computer with no interest in the advert, only to generate costs for the advertiser
    • IP addresses are tracked to monitor this
    • Report any suspicious activity
    • Monitor the IP addresses using your own website analysis tools
    • No recorded case has been taken to court … yet!
  • Effective PPC
    • Show when it counts
    • Choose keywords carefully
    • Select longer tail terms
    • Go negative to be positive
    • Think seasonal
    • Ad copy is key
    • Back it up
    • Go vertical
    • Go local versus international
    • Use CPC management tools
  • Converting PPC traffic
    • If you have a fabulous website that is not drawing traffic, you don't have a business
      • A PPC campaign which brings you truckloads of traffic is only valuable if you can convert that traffic into sales
      • Don't make your customer jump through hoops to find the information or product they are looking for
      • Pay per click ad campaigns can bring you lots of valuable, targeted traffic, but it's only valuable if you can convert that traffic to sales or leads
  • Call to action (CTA)
    • Call-to-action statements (those final words that inspire your customers to take an action - usually to make a purchase) are not universal
    • An effective call-to-action is more than just the simple "order today" or "click here now" phrase. Yes, those play a part, but it takes more than that to motivate buyers
    • Example: "We cut costs at Largecorp by 47%, and at Biginc by 53%. If we don't cut your costs by 40%, you pay nothing - click here or call today for a free evaluation!"
  • Writing an effective CTA
    • Have the CTA follow naturally and build upon what you've already said in the written material
    • The message should always be specific
    • Use power words to convey urgency
    • When you want a customer to take a certain action, be specific
    • But you may want to avoid calls to action that give an impression of "hype" or high-pressure sales
    • Readers tend to be drawn to a P.S. at the end of a letter or other written offer
  • Plan your advert
    • Plan the advert. Use a storyboard to help you propel your presentation forward in a logical manner
    • Design it so that it's a call to action is clear
    • Frame out where the text should go on the slide on a piece of paper or the computer. The call to action should be the most prominent part of the screen
    • Write the call to action so that is has a clear, concise message
    • Prepare the advert in the second person.
    • Run the advert in front of a test audience. Make note of their suggestions
  • SEM Exercise Your second chance to do some work © Jack Marketing Solutions 2008 All rights reserved
  • SEM exercise
    • You have 30 minutes to:
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/phrases for the ‘advert’
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    30
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    29
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    28
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    27
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    26
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    25
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    24
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    23
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    22
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    21
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    20
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    19
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    18
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    17
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    16
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    15
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    14
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    13
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    12
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    11
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    10
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    9
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    8
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    7
  • SEM exercise
    • Write 3 AdWords adverts for a company/brand of your choice
    • Add at least 10 keywords/ phrases for the ‘advert’
    6
  • SEM exercise 5
  • SEM exercise 4
  • SEM exercise 3
  • SEM exercise 2
  • SEM exercise 1
  • Careers in Marketing What are the options? © Jack Marketing Solutions 2008 All rights reserved
  • What can you do?
    • Product/services marketing
    • Direct marketing
    • Strategic marketing
    • Advertising
    • Public relations
    • Sponsorship/events management
    • Marketing research
    • Online marketing
    • B2B, B2C
    • FMCG
  • Qualifications
    • Two main routes:
    • University (Marketing Masters)
    • Professional Institutes
      • Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM)
      • Institute of Direct Marketing (IDM)
      • Market Research Society (MRS)
  • CIM Introductory Certificate in Marketing Professional Certificate In Marketing Professional Diploma in Marketing Professional Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing
  • CIM
    • Introductory Certificate in Marketing A short course for anyone who wants to gain a good grounding in the basic principles and tools of marketing; and it provides a solid platform for more advanced qualifications.
    • Professional Certificate in Marketing For anyone in a junior marketing position or a marketing-related role. It provides a thorough and practical insight into a range of marketing issues - and is a valuable qualification as you look to progress your career.
  • CIM
    • Professional Diploma in Marketing For those who already hold the above certificate, or who have a degree in any discipline. It provides a variety of skills at an operational level - not least how to write and execute a marketing plan.
    • Professional PostGraduate Diploma in Marketing The most advanced qualification we offer, focusing not just on marketing strategy, but its role in general business - and the ability to make marketing accountable in your organisation.
    Source: www.cim.co.uk
  • IDM
    • The IDM Certificate in B2B Marketing The syllabus covers literally every aspect of B2B marketing, from planning and budgeting, data to creative, and media to measurement. A series of real-life case studies provide valuable insights into innovative B2B strategies and the results they achieved. Every lesson explores and explains a key aspect of the B2B marketing landscape as it exists right now.
    • The IDM Diploma in B2B Marketing Unlike other qualifications which are exam based, the Diploma is based around a dissertation.
  • IDM
    • The IDM Certificate in Digital Marketing Designed for marketers who are actively involved in the operational aspects of planning and managing digital or multi-channel marketing campaigns.
    • The IDM Diploma in Digital Marketing Providing senior marketers with a thorough understanding of the strategic applications of digital marketing. The programme has been specifically designed for individuals who are responsible for determining marketing strategy and overseeing the introduction of digital tools, technologies and techniques.
    Source: www.theidm.com
  • MRS
    • MRS Level 7 Diploma in Market & Social Research Practice is for experienced researchers with two or more years’ varied research experience
    • MRS Level 5 Advanced Certificate in Market & Social Research Practice is for new researchers or those taking on a research brief.
    • MRS/City & Guilds Level 2 Certificate in Market & Social Research is for non-practitioners, an ideal introduction to the principles and techniques of effective research.
    • MRS Level 2 Certificate in Interviewing Skills for Market & Social Research is for market research interviewers.
    Source: www.mrs.org.uk
  • Marketing jobs
    • Direct to companies - e.g. Graduate training schemes
    • CIM jobs service
    • Marketing magazines
      • Marketing
      • Marketing Week
      • Precision Marketing …
    • Recruitment companies
  • Next steps
    • Get qualified
    • Prove your commitment & keep up to date
    • Get involved
  • Chartered status
    • Qualification studies Maximum: 35 hours
    • Short training courses and workshops Maximum: 35 hours
    • Language training Maximum: 35 hours
    • In-company development
      • Planned, in-company development scheme
      • Promotion and appraisal
      • Project work
    • Maximum: 35 hours
    • Imparting knowledge Maximum: 14, or 35 for books
    • Mentoring Maximum: 21 hours
    • Conferences and exhibitions Maximum: 10 hours
    • Contribution to the community Maximum: 8 hours
    • Private study Maximum: 8 hours
    • Development events
      • CPD events
      • Events run by other marketing or business related organisations
    • Maximum: 21 hours
  • Any questions ? © Jack Marketing Solutions 2008 All rights reserved
  • Thank you [email_address] © Jack Marketing Solutions 2008 All rights reserved