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Managing Your Customers Through The Web
 

Managing Your Customers Through The Web

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Presentation to Penton 6/10/2004

Presentation to Penton 6/10/2004

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    Managing Your Customers Through The Web Managing Your Customers Through The Web Presentation Transcript

    • managing your customers through the web Thom Poole – Head of Portal Customer Interaction
    • managing your customers through the web Thom Poole – Head of Portal Customer Interaction: 6 th October 2004
    • agenda
      • give ‘em what they want
      • relationships – who wants them?
      • trust as a management tool
      • involvement creates interest
      • the marketing art of the opt-in
    • give ‘em what they want
      • giving the customer what they want, think they want, or can be persuaded they want
      1
    • give ‘em what they want
      • understand your customers
      • build relationships where relationships are appropriate
      • give customers the feeling of being in control
      1 – give ‘em what they want
      • exploitation
      • matching needs and benefits
    • service culture
      • good service pays
      • good service breeds loyalty
      • good service doesn’t mean just resolution to problems
      • service is not just customer care – it is everything you do with the customer, from the first contact onwards
      • service involves every member of your company, even virtual members (delivery people, shop assistants, etc)
      1 – give ‘em what they want
    • keeping it simple
      • if it is understandable, customers will talk positively about it
      • if you have easy to use processes, customers will look favourably on even the bad situations
      • make finding information about the product/service easy and increase usage and loyalty
      • build trust!
      1 – give ‘em what they want
    • relationships – who needs them?
      • CRM is king, but who lives it?
      • and more importantly, who wants it?
      2
    • relationship management
      • I don't know who you are.
      • I don't know your company.
      • I don't know your company's products.
      • I don't know your company's customers.
      • I don't know your company's record.
      • I don't know your company's reputation.
      • I don't know what your company stands for.
      • Now - what was it that you wanted to sell me?
      2 – relationships – who wants them? Man in the chair advert - McGraw-Hill
    • who wants it?
      • if a relationship is appropriate, then build, manage and control it
      • “ I don’t want a relationship with your company"
      • give the customer the feeling of being in control
      • make the relationship relevant
      • learn something new about the customer every time you interact
      • let the customer learn something new every time you interact
      2 – relationships – who wants them?
    • asymmetric information flow Spremann, 2001 2 – relationships – who wants them?
    • who manages it?
      • manage at arm’s length
      • let the customer feel in control
        • opt-in and profile can be managed by the customer and provide better results
      • make it easy for the customer to control
      • make it worth their while to have a relationship, and to maintain their own profile
        • incentivise or even bribe them…
      2 – relationships – who wants them?
    • who benefits from it? 2 – relationships – who wants them?
    • trust as a management tool
      • people buy from their friends!
      3
    • friendship & trust
      • people buy from their friends
      • listen, encourage & lead by example
      • loyalty come from trust, not the other way around
      • relationships are stronger when trust is involved
      • trustworthiness is profitable
      3 – trust as a management tool
    • the trust value chain 3 – trust as a management tool The Trust-focused Value Chain - © Poole 2003 Adapted from Michael Porter’s Value Chain model, 1983.
    • trust lifecycle trust 0 time 3 – trust as a management tool
    • loyalty
      • loyalty is not a plastic card programme!
      • trust drives loyalty
      • if customers are loyal, they will accept small imperfections
      • loyal customers spend more
      • loyalty, like trust, is a two way process
      3 – trust as a management tool
    • trust in marketing – trusted brands
      • automotive Ford
      • kitchen appliances Hotpoint
      • PC Dell
      • mobile phone Nokia
      • camera Canon
      • holiday company Thomson
      • bank/building society Lloyds TSB
      • credit card Visa
      • insurance company Prudential
      • airline BA
      • internet company AOL
      • petrol retailer Esso
      • soft drink Coca-Cola
      • vitamins Seven Seas
      • pain relief Nurofen
      • cold remedy Lemsip
      • toothpaste Colgate
      • hair care Pantene
      • cosmetic Boots
      • skin care Oil of Olay
      • soap powder Persil
      3 – trust as a management tool
    • why are we doing this again? 3 – trust as a management tool
    • get your nose in front – everyone else is trying to do the same 3 – trust as a management tool
    • involvement creates interest
      • being involved give a sense of belonging, and we all want to belong.
      4
    • fostering the dialogue
      • Dialogues are more interesting than monologues
      4 – involvement creates interest From Alfred Tack Org. Interest I We You
    • adding a sense of community
      • customers are more likely to enter into a dialogue if they are comfortable with the company they are in (people buying from friends!)
      • more emotional triggers can be used within a community
      • customers are more likely to sort themselves into the correct community – helping with profiling
      • understand your customer, but address the community – this is less imposing (does not work for every customer)
      • people are more comfortable in communities
      4 – involvement creates interest
    • the integrated approach
      • customers interact with the character of the company brand, just as they would the character of the trusted salesperson
      • every touch point is an opportunity to exchange information
      • every touch point is an opportunity to build trustworthiness in the brand
      • make outbound communications interactive – remember AIDA (awareness, interest, desire and ACTION)
      • make your interactions build on one-another, and learn a little, each time you interact (little & often)
      4 – involvement creates interest
    • the marketing art of the opt-in
      • how can we encourage the customer to allow us to talk to them?
      5
    • opt-in, please?
      • legal requirement since December 2003
      • still great distrust in the market for opting in
      • confusion is still alive, opt-in text is designed to confuse – so differentiate – KISS!
      • the opt-in is the start of the interactive relationship
      • “ what’s in it for me …?”
      5 – the marketing art of the opt-in
    • the creative art of marketing
      • marketing is a creative ‘art-form’
      • be creative in your approach to customers
      • be creative in your incentives to customers
      • find new ways to enter into dialogue with your customers
      • use customer communities to help define and test your ideas
      • adapt your ideas according to community/customer profiles
      5 – the marketing art of the opt-in
    • how can we do it?
      • give them virtual control of their profile
      • include them in your plans – make them feel important and wanted
      • give them the [virtual] personal touch
      5 – the marketing art of the opt-in
      • bribery!
        • give them access to something they want/value
        • reward them as part of loyalty scheme
    • why are we doing it?
      • build loyalty
      • increase trustworthiness
      • create a ‘test-bed’ for new ideas
      • build a community of users and advocates
      • and most importantly, be profitable!
      5 – the marketing art of the opt-in
    • thank you
      • Thom Poole
      • Head of Portal Customer Interaction
      • O2 UK Ltd
      • thom . poole @o2.com