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Managing Business Customers on the Web
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Managing Business Customers on the Web

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Presentation given to the IDM conference in February 2005

Presentation given to the IDM conference in February 2005

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Managing Business Customers on the Web Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Managing business customers on the web Thom Poole – Head of Portal Customer Interaction February 2005 © Thom Poole 2004 All rights reserved
  • 2. Managing business customers on the web Case studies and impressions of business customer/account management online Thom Poole – Head of Portal Customer Interaction O 2 UK Ltd.
  • 3. Agenda
    • The Internet as a business tool
    • Case Study 1 – An early adopter getting it right
    • Case Study 2 – One step at a time
    • Case Study 3 – It gets complicated
    • Ideas on how to treat business customers online
  • 4. Why I’m here
    • Involved in e-marketing & the Internet since 1992
    • Teaching e-marketing for 7 years
      • e-Commerce
      • Web design for marketers (and the terrified!)
      • CRM
    • Written papers on ‘Data Privacy’, ‘The Marketing Art of the Opt-In’ and ‘Trust in Business and Marketing’
    • Written a book on ‘Ethical e-Marketing’ called ‘Play It By Trust’
    • Working for O 2 as Head of Portal Customer Interaction – focus on customer centricity and ethics
  • 5. The Internet as a business tool 1 The 'Net is a waste of time, and that's exactly what's right about it William Gibson (1948 - )
  • 6. The Internet as a business tool
    • The origins of the Internet are as a military and academic tool
    • Early view:
      • “ The Internet is a great medium for information, but I don’t know how anyone can make money from it!” (Poole, 1992)
    • An ideal source of competitor, supplier and market information
    • An ideal communications medium, with a healthy mix of push and pull marketing
    • Has expanded the boundaries of business and trade
    • Has increased the speed at which we do business
  • 7. What is it?
    • Brochureware
    • Sales
    • Support
    • Administration
    • Procurement
    • Education
    • Training
    • Tracking
    • Entertainment
    • Information/News
  • 8. Case Studies
    • Case Study 1 – An early adopter getting it right
    • Case Study 2 – One step at a time
    • Case Study 3 – It gets complicated
  • 9. Case study 1 2 An early adopter getting it right
  • 10. An early adopter getting it right
    • Hilti – manufacturer of professional power tools and construction equipment
    • Head office in Liechtenstein
    • Customers are construction trade only, predominantly served by own sales force
    • Internet strategy adopted in 1994
    • Basic Internet philosophy has remained unchanged in over ten years
  • 11. The strategy
    • To provide an online catalogue
    • To generate sales leads
    • Global solution
    • To enable the maintenance of differential pricing throughout the world
    • To make the site sticky and worth returning to
  • 12. Global presence
  • 13. Local execution
  • 14. Online catalogue
  • 15. Site stickiness
  • 16. Hilti’s methodology
    • Maintain the established business sales channels
    • Provide an up-to-date catalogue
    • Make the site sticky and a place worth returning to
    • Maintain strategic objectives even during site redesigns
    • Bring all local offices in line, in terms of design, but allow local adaptation of content and focus
  • 17. Case study 2 3 One step at a time
  • 18. One step at a time
    • Johnston Sweepers manufacture industrial road sweepers
    • Head office in Dorking, Surrey
    • Custom-made bodies on commercial truck chassis
    • No networked computer system or website
    • Unsure of the profitability of their products until they left the factory
    • Developed an in-house ‘Sales Configurator’ for the sales department & as a reporting tool
    • The Configurator included a contact management system
  • 19. Local from the outset
  • 20. The unrealised opportunity
    • The Configurator was an in-house solution only
    • The database could be linked to an html front-end, allowing:
      • Customer product configuration
      • Increased visibility of products for cross-sell and up-sell
      • Lead generation
    • The online Configurator could be placed within an Extranet, or a secure area of the site
    • Pricing would remain within internal systems only
  • 21. … but
    • Investment in a new website was low because of the lack of functional understanding
    • Competitive concerns held online Configurator publication back
    • Dealers were sceptical of the developments as they saw the Internet as a global marketing tool
    • So, the next generation Configurator has not adopted an online interface
      • A missed opportunity?
  • 22. Case study 3 4 It gets complicated
  • 23. It gets complicated
    • O 2 was demerged from BT in November 2001
    • It was formed from BT Cellnet, Airwave and Genie
    • O 2 is based in Slough and Leeds
    • Genie, the online portal, was a youth brand and very consumer orientated
    • Few business customers buy mobile phones on the web
    • Online business users appear to be unloyal and very demanding
  • 24. Strategy eCRM
    • X-sell / upsell
    • Customisation
    • Realtime CRM
    RE-DESIGN
    • New CMS
    • New design
    SUPPORT DISCOVER
    • My O 2
    • eCare
    • Demo’s
    • Portal Products
    • Demo’s
    • Brochureware
    ACQUIRE
    • Shopping baskets
    • Configure
  • 25. Segmentational self-service
  • 26. Business product offerings
    • Businesses generally have:
    • PIM (Personal Information Manager) applications
    • E-mail accounts/systems
    • They come to O 2 for a mobile phone service
    • They may add:
      • Group conferencing
      • ‘ Blackberry’ communications
      • Wireless cards (for laptop connectivity)
  • 27. What business customers do online
    • The ability to manage mobile phone accounts online
    • Online help to solve problems fast, and the ability to communicate this around an organisation
    • Mobile office, with products such as Blackberry, XDA and data cards linked to online services
    • X-mail, an SME email business solution
  • 28. How to treat business customers online 5 So how can we do it?
  • 29. How to treat business customers online Q: Are you a business or a consumer customer? Q: How many adverts have you seen today? Yesterday? Last week? A: You are all consumers for something & always looking for WIIFM e.g. A business person during the week, becomes football fan at the weekend. So, we can offer consumer football alerts to the customer for that persona
  • 30. Business tools SUPPORT DISCOVER ACQUIRE FAQ Care Upgrades Cost savings Front-end procurement Billing Performance tracker Consistency Expense management Learn new business methods
  • 31. Legal framework
    • Slick B2C websites are setting the standards
      • Q: Can you afford to turn your back on customers to your site?
      • A: Of course not, and that means that the DDA applies to you
      • Q: As a business, do your customers expect respect for their privacy from all their suppliers and partners?
      • A: Of course! Get the business customer’s opt-in for information, it may not be law, but they will start to expect it as they do as consumers
  • 32. e-Marketing considerations
    • B2B offers few USP’s online
    • Competitive advantage is therefore achievable
    • Understand your customer’s requirements
    • Treat your customers as they expect to be treated
    • Teach your customers what they should expect, and deliver it
    • Support, Discover, Acquire …
    • Benefits focus on cost & time saving
    • Consumer sites can be ‘copied’ in style, functionality, etc
  • 33. Summary 6 “ Business customers are just consumers in suits”
  • 34. Summary
    • Personal consumer perceptions will influence corporate buying decisions
    • Make your website functional, sticky and ‘approachable’
    • Develop an Internet strategy for your audience & stick to it
    • Don’t be afraid of change, but take it one step at a time
    • Take your customers with you on the journey
    • The Internet is a tool – make it work for you and your customers
    • E-marketing must be consistent with all other marketing activities
  • 35. Thom Poole Head of Portal Customer Interaction [email_address] Managing business customers on the web Thank you