Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Genealogy - An introduction
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Genealogy - An introduction

1,000
views

Published on

Presentation & workshop for the Fernhurst Centre, West Sussex - November 2006

Presentation & workshop for the Fernhurst Centre, West Sussex - November 2006

Published in: Education

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,000
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • ‘Censes’
  • Glover Robert - Head of household - Married - Age 32 - Occupation Ag Lab - born ditto (Great Gidding, Huntingdonshire) Ditto Ruth - Wife - Married - 25 - Ag Lab wife - born ditto Ditto Hannah - Daughter - Unmarried - 6 - no occupation - ditto Ditto Thomas - Son - Unmarried - 4 - no occupation - ditto Ditto George - Son - Unmarried - 2 - no occupation - ditto Hughes Catherine - Mother-in-Law - Widow - 53 - Wife of Ag Lab - Funding, Northamptonshire
  • Robert Glover - Head - Married - 42 - Agricultural Labourer - Great Giddings, Hunts Ruth ditto - Wife - Married - 33 - no occupation - Ditto Thomas ditto - Son - Unmarried - 14 - no occupation - ditto George ditto - Son - Unmarried - 12 - no occupation - ditto William ditto - Son - Unmarried - 6 - no occupation - ditto Ruth ditto - daughter - Unmarried - 4 - no occupation - ditto Mary ditto - daughter - Unmarried - 2 - no occupation - ditto Catherine ditto - daughter - Unmarried - 9 months - no occupation - ditto
  • George & Thomas working as Agricultural Labourers in Thorney, Cambridgeshire, at a place called English Grove.
  • George has now moved to London - Brixton to be precise He is also married and living at 23 Jelf Road in the parish of St Matthews George Glover - Head - Married - 32 - Painter - b. Hunts. Giddin (note the misspelling) Ann - Wife - 35 - b. Berks, Holyport Florence A - 4 - b. Brixton, Surrey Edith - 2 - b. Brixton, Surrey George W - 1 month - b. Brixton, Surrey Ann Hall - Lodger - Unmarried - 43 - Cook - Fulbourne, Cambridgeshire Richard Bell - Lodger - Married - 66 - Clerk - London
  • Still at 23 Jelf Road George Glover - Head - Married - 42 - Painter Annie - Wife - 45 Florrie (!) - 14 - no occupation Edith - 12 - Scholar Ernest - 8 - Scholar Hattie (!) - 5 - Scholar George James - 1
  • 23 Jelf Road again George Glover - Head - Married - 52 - House Decorator & Builder Annie - 54 - b. Maidenhead, Berks Ernest - 18 - Paper Hanger Harriet (!) - 15 - Drapers Assistant George - 12
  • Don’t take it for granted that people will be recorded in the town you think or know they were born in. For example - that wonderful place in Berkshire (formerly in Buckinghamshire) - Slough is not a registration location. People there will be recorded as being in Eton, or in Upton-cum-Chalvey
  • Recorded in the District of Lambeth, sub district Brixton in the County of Surrey Birth on the 28th October 1878 at 48 Barnwell Road - Edith a girl to George Glover and Ann Glover (formerly Weston) Signature, description and address of referer - A Glover, Mother, 224 Cold Harbour Lane (could have moved after the birth) Registered on the 2nd December 1878 Registrar details
  • Marriage of George & Annie At St Matthews Church, Brixton in Surrey May 17th 1875 George Glover and Ann Weston - George was 26, and a Batchelor, and Annie 30, and a Spinster. George’s occupation is ‘Labourer’ George lived at 28 Brighton Terrace, and Annie at 427 Cold Harbour Lane. George’s father, as we know, is Robert - a labourer Annie father was William Weston, deceased! One of the witnesses was Ruth Glover - could be George’s mother or her sister.
  • My great great grandfather - Thomas Weir - born in St Lucia, died on the 14th March 1882 at 48 Camellia Street near St. Thomas’ Hospital in Lambeth, aged 62 His occupation was ‘Army Pensioner’ and died of something chronic that I can’t read.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Genealogy Discover the past
    • 2. Introduction
      • What is Genealogy?
      • The easy stuff - living memories
      • Census
      • Certification & Big Brother
      • Forms
      • Next sessions:
      • Online searches
      • Finding, reading and understanding forms
      • Other sources and resources
    • 3. Questionnaires
      • Do you, or older relatives have pictures, certificates, letters, etc?
      • Where did they live?
      • Did they serve in the military, police, work on the railways or in the civil service, etc?
      • Memories of births, marriages & deaths - these are often the times families come together
      • Burials - where were relatives buried?
      • Were relatives famous (or infamous)? So would there be other places to look for information?
    • 4. Census And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed. (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.) And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David) Luke Ch. 2
    • 5. UK Censes
      • The British Census started in 1801 and held every 10 since (except 1941)
      • The genealogical value of the 1801-31 censes is very limited
      • 1841 has some interesting information, but is also quite limited
      • The Victorians were happy to call people cripples, idiots and paupers on the census
      • Many villages have no house references, but listings are in house order (i.e. neighbours)
      • Censes were collected by civil servants or volunteers - they wrote what they heard, thought they heard, assumed or could spell, so be wary of errors (we will see some examples)
      • The last census released was the 1901. 1911 will be available in 2011 (100-year rule)
    • 6. Example
      • The Census example is of George Glover, born in 1849 in Great Gidding, Huntingdonshire
      • We start with his father - Robert, in 1841
      • We then follow George through to 1901
    • 7. 6th/7th June 1841
    • 8. 30th/31st March 1851
    • 9. 7th/8th April 1861
    • 10. 2nd/3rd April 1871
    • 11. 3rd/4th April 1881
    • 12. 5th/6th April 1891
    • 13. 31st March/1st April 1901
    • 14. George Glover’s Movements Born & raised Lived, raised his family & died
    • 15. If you are at a loss …
      • What if you don’t know where to start with a certain name?
        • Is there a name who was born before 1901?
        • Check the name distribution and try the highest concentrations
        • Work backwards (not as easy)
        • Find someone else who has researched other branches of the same family tree
      Glover in 1881 Spacial-literacy
    • 16. Certification Your passages of life are recorded by the State
    • 17. History of the records
      • The parish church was the recorder of passages of life as ‘everything’ went through it
      • In 1837, the Government decided to record all births, marriages and deaths for the 15.9 million inhabitants (1841)
      • Even after the legislation, not all records were immediately submitted
      • Early records are handwritten, sometimes like hieroglyphics
      • Later records increased the information they contained
    • 18. Parish records
    • 19. Early example Surname: Glover First Names: Thomas District: Oundle Vol.: XV Page: 529
    • 20. A quick lesson in geography Oundle in Northamptonshire is the registration centre for Great Gidding in Huntingdonshire (Cambridgeshire)
    • 21. Births October, November, December 1875 Surname: Churchill First Names: Winston Leonard District: Woodstock Vol.: 3a Page: 695 Actual data: 20th November 1875 Blenheim Palace, Woodstock
    • 22. Marriages July, August, September 1908 Churchill Winston Leonard Spencer St. George Hanover Square 1a 1110 Actual data: 12th September 1908 To Clementine Hozier
    • 23. Marriages on FreeBMD
    • 24. Deaths Q1 1965 Churchill Winston LS Kensington 5g 1192 Actual data: 24th January 1965 Hyde Park Gate, London
    • 25. The Certificates - Births
    • 26. The certificates - Marriage
    • 27. The certificates - Death
    • 28. Recording your progress How do you record your information
    • 29. Family Groups
    • 30. Personal Searches
    • 31. Family Trees
    • 32. Bespoke Trees
    • 33. Glossary Understanding some terminology
    • 34. Primary sources
      • Unbiased, objective record of an event made at or near the time the described event happened:
        • Letters
        • Photos
        • Clothing
        • Certificates
        • Church records
        • Census records
        • Court records
        • Divorce records
        • Driving licenses and passports
        • Military records
        • Ship passenger lists
    • 35. Secondary sources
      • Accounts of the past created by people writing about events sometime after they happened:
        • History books
        • Memoirs
        • Your (or someone else's) family tree
        • Family bibles
        • Cemetary/tombstone records
        • Some church records
    • 36. Recording your research
      • Your direct-line research
      • Individual pages of notes, sorted chronologically
      • Personal guidelines
      • Record:
      • Source of the information
      • When you got it
      • Where you got it
      • Who has the original record
      • Any anecdotes related to the information
    • 37. Numbering
      • Ahnentafel (German for ancestors table)
        • You are numbered 1
        • Your father is 2
        • Your mother is 3, etc
      • Register system
      • Record system
      • Henry system
      • D’Aboville system
      • D’Villiers or Pama system
      • Or you just let the software number your entries for you
    • 38. Relations
      • Half … - shares one parent only
      • In-law … - related by marriage
      • Kith & Kin - Kith are friends and acquaintances, kin are blood or in-law relatives
      • Step … - legal relations from a remarriage
      • 1st Cousin - blood kin who shares 2 of the same grandparents
      • Double 1st Cousin - father’s sibling marrying mother’s sibling
      • 2nd Cousin - blood kin who share same great grandparents
      • 3rd & 4th Cousins - sharing kin further back
      • … removed - cousins separated (removed) by being generations apart
      • Kissing Cousins - marriage between cousins (should only be 3rd and above)
    • 39. Abbreviations
      • c Approximate date (also circa)
      • bap. Baptised
      • Born
      • bur. Buried
      • C18 Century (18th in this e.g.)
      • dau. Daughter
      • Died
      • Father
      • gf. Grandfather
      • g-gf. Great Grandfather (5xg-gf)
      • inf. Infant
      • jnr. Junior
      • liv. Lived/living
      • marr. Married or marriage
      • o.t.p. Of This Parish
      • Son
      • unm. Unmarried
      • wid. Widow
      • wdr. Widower
      • Wife
      • B.T. Bishop’s Transcripts
      • CRO County Records Office
      • FHS Family History Society
      • IGI Int’l Genealogical Index
      • MI Monumental Inscriptions
      • PR Parish Records
    • 40. Symbols Marriage Descent line Uncertain descent Illegitimate descent
    • 41. Other Resources A selection
    • 42. Online Resources
      • Ancestry.com - UK Deluxe Membership - £69.95/yr
      • Ancestry.com - World Deluxe Membership - £199.95/yr
      • Ancestry.com - 14-day Pay per view (10 views) - £4.95
      • GenesReunited.co.uk - £7.50/year
      • 1837Online.com - units (views) between 5p & 10p each
      • OriginsNetwork.com - between £22.50 and £34.50/yr
      • Useful Links
    • 43. Research tips - 1
      • Write down every nit-picky detail
      • Always list your sources (who tells you what)
      • Keep a correspondence log
      • Be grateful for relatives in small towns
      • Take advantage of your local library’s inter-library loans system
      • Reread your notes from time-to-time
      • Don’t accept other people’s data as fact
      • Find alternative ways to look for relatives
      • Don’t forget to check church records and graveyards
      • Be thoughtful
      • Don’t expect others to do your work for you (unless you pay them)
    • 44. Research tips - 2
      • Join a surname-specific mailing list
      • Know when to ask for help and give it
      • Advertise
      • Don’t get frustrated by delays or what can seem to be insurmountable odds
      • Use valuable online resources - but don’t discount or overlook local sources
      • Invest in a micro-cassette recorder
      • Your camera is not just for family photos
      • Stay on top of your research
      • Double check all dates
      • Make a concerted effort to get complete name information
    • 45. Research tips - 3
      • Don’t rely just on a book’s index
      • Remember that boundaries and place names often change
      • Look for clues even where you don’t expect them
      • Use common data formats
      • Be grateful
      • Consider yourself always on duty
      • Take advantage of waiting times
    • 46. The Course You’ve got one lesson down, so what is happening in the other lessons?
    • 47. The Census
      • Next week:
      • The census is normally a good starting point to find family members and locations
      • You will have an exercise to find a famous person in a census
      • You can then use the skills of reading census returns to do some research of your own
    • 48. Certificates
      • The week after next:
      • If you can track down the references to birth, marriage or death certificates, you can find out a great deal more about an individual
      • You will be asked to find the birth, marriage and death certificate references for a famous person (a different one to last week)
      • You can now use your skills to find references of your own - try to find the people you found in your census searches
    • 49. Recording your research
      • The last week
      • We will have a quick look at some parish records first
      • Then we will look at some software packages to record your research
      • The software is on each computer in the Centre, so you can then load your research results on it and start to build your family tree
    • 50. Online Resources
      • We will be using online resources such as Ancestry and 1837Online. For next week, please arrange to have an account with them (1837Online needed in week 3)
      • If you use the links on the webpage called ‘LINKS.HTM’ on the CD-ROM, I can provide you with some money back on your purchase, as I have an affiliate deal with Ancestry and OriginsNetwork
      • Similiarly, for the books and software in the webpage called ‘BOOKS.HTM’ via Amazon
      • To get the money back, please let me know when you subcribed/paid, and for what, and I will forward the refund when I receive it
    • 51. Thank you Any questions? Thom Poole [email_address]