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Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14
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Participatory environmental science 2013 04 14

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  • 1. Participatory environmental science Luigi Ceccaroni, Barcelona Digital Technology Centre Laia Subirats, Barcelona Digital Technology Centre Jaume Piera, CSIC Dick M.A. Schaap, MARIS
  • 2. Citclops project’s challenges and expected final outcomes• Optical monitoring (color, transparency and fluorescence) – but better – Challenges: • Use of optical monitoring to interpret seascapes • Combination and interpretation of data collected by: • A distributed group of people (Citclops’s participatory environmental science) • Publicly available data: – GEOSS – Satellites – Standard maps • other sources (to be defined) – Expected final outcomes: • To re-design current monitoring • To reveal aspects/details of the environment people can’t normally see
  • 3. How Citclops is engaged with GEO and the implementation of GEOSS• Active working-group/task (WA-01) on Integrated Water Information (incl. Floods and Droughts) within GEO and GEOSS frameworks – The WA-01-C4: Global Water Quality Products and Services component identifies the following needs: • “Monitoring water quality using remote sensing, in conjunction with strategic in-situ sampling, is needed to determine the current status of water quality conditions and to help anticipate, mitigate, and even avoid future water catastrophes.” • “Systematic investments in an inland and near-coastal water quality information system are required.” – The GEO Inland and Near-Coastal Water Quality Working Group aims to develop international operational water quality information systems based on Earth observation. – It also requires support by dedicated in-situ sampling.
  • 4. How Citclops is engaged with GEO and the implementation of GEOSS• Projects like Citclops bridge the gap between the local sampling experience and satellite information.• Making the connection between the citizen observatory and satellite-based information will: – Commit the users to the water quality field – Give support to the innovation in space-based research and services• Citclops results and experience will be directly linked to GEO: – One of the partners (Hans van der Woerd from VU-VUmc together with Gordon Campbell from ESA) directly involved in the information component that will make the Earth- observation products better accessible for the public and the local managers.
  • 5. Participatory environmental science• Citizens as environmental data consumers • Monitoring tackled by scientists or policy makers alone • Expensive • Hard to use technology • Quantity, coverage? • High quality • Sustainable?• Citizens as environmental data creators and consumers • Monitoring tackled by scientists, policy makers and citizens • Low cost • Easy to use technology • Quantity, coverage? • Quality? • Sustainable
  • 6. The convergence of two trends• Commonplace objects understanding what we do with them –Thanks to the proliferation of cheap, powerful sensors
  • 7. The convergence of two trends• Our personal identities firmly connected to our profiles on social networks
  • 8. Interaction made “social”• How to create peer pressure? • Recycle and impress your (Facebook) friends, or dont recycle and risk incurring their wrath • Share your weight with your Twitter followers; it will help you to stick to a diet • Monitor the environment and impress your friends, or dont monitor the environment and…??? • Like a videogame, with points for doing good?• Why create peer pressure?• We are not mere automatons who assist big data in askingand answering questions. Well, we shouldn’t be…
  • 9. The social-engineering context• Social engineering disguised as product engineering • From smart cars to smart sensors, "smart" as the shorthand for transforming present-day social reality • Smart technologies becoming more intrusive • Risk of undermining our autonomy by supporting behaviors that someone somewhere has deemed desirable: • Smart forks informing us that we are eating too fast • Smart toothbrushes urging us to spend more time brushing our teeth • Smart sensors in our cars telling us we drive too fast • Smartphones telling us which beach is better for us • Devices giving us useful feedback • But also sharing everything they know about our habits with institutions whose interests may be different from our own
  • 10. Different kinds of “smart”• “Enhancing“: Devices leaving us in complete control of thesituation and seek to enhance our decision-making byproviding more information: • An Internet-jacked kettle alerting us when the national power grid is overloaded • Not preventing us from boiling yet another cup of tea, but adding an extra ethical dimension to that choice • A grocery cart scanning the bar codes of products we put into it, informing us of their nutritional benefits and country of origin • Enhancing—rather than impoverishing—our autonomy • An application to contribute to ocean-color research, coupling color to the most important life form in the water, the phytoplankton, and informing about the ocean’s health • What’s in it for me? Education, pollution, sediments… • Is it sustainable? Public, private, artists…
  • 11. Different kinds of “smart”• “Limiting“: Technologies making certain choices andbehaviors impossible; smart gadgets seeking to limit,not to expand, what we can do: • Facial recognition technologies confirming we are who we say we are… • We must resist attempts to universalize this logic:
  • 12. Different kinds of “smart”• “Limiting“: Technologies making certain choices andbehaviors impossible; smart gadgets seeking to limit,not to expand, what we can do: • Facial recognition technologies confirming we are who we say we are… • We must resist attempts to universalize this logic:
  • 13. Different kinds of “smart”• Is the BinCam “enhancing” or “limiting”? • Not forced to recycle • Appealing to our base instincts: • Must earn gold bars and rewards! • Must “compete” with others! • Must win and impress friends! • Not treating us as autonomous human beings, capable of weighing the options by ourselves • Allowing a recommendation system or Facebook or the government to do our thinking for us• What about crowdsourcing systems involving people onholiday (scuba diving, on cruise, on the beach) in datacollection?
  • 14. Applications
  • 15. Applications• Smartphones, water color and Forel-Ule (images courtesy of Marcel Wernand, NIOZ)
  • 16. Smart crowdsourcing•Do application designers know precisely how we should behave, sothe only problem is finding the right incentive?•A truly smart crowdsourcing system should make us reflect on ourenvironmental habits and contribute to conscious deliberation: • Letting us benchmark our usual swimming waters against other waters in our area, instead of trying to shame us with point deductions and peer pressure•The task of technology should not be to liberate us from problem-solving.•We need to enroll smart technology in helping us with problem-solving.•Maybe… in promoting problem solving with a monitoring twist
  • 17. Smart crowdsourcing
  • 18. Applications, applications•Improvement of scuba-diving activities•Ranking the best beaches•Early-warning systems for HABs and bio-chemical hazards•Monitoring swell and length of waves•Water transparency via phone pictures and Secchi disc•Retrieval of sensor measurements from low-cost moorings
  • 19. From current monitoring to "participatory environmental science"•Monitoring and… • Mobile devices as sensor platforms • Georeferencing • Education through citizens’ effective participation • Community involvement • Internet-distribution and social platforms to observe and then share: • Photos (ocean color, transparency) • Oil spills • Algal blooms • Recommendation • Decision support
  • 20. Information acquisition
  • 21. Information acquisitionBull. Korean Chem. Soc. 2012, Vol. 33, No. 2
  • 22. Information delivery
  • 23. Information delivery
  • 24. Information delivery
  • 25. Information processing•Standardization, interoperability•GIS and satellite-data processing, integration andinterpretation•Data-quality validation in real-time • Taking into account position, orientation and weather conditions•Context-awareness • Data provided in a more or less voluntary, active or conscious way • Metadata and context data: time, location, name, instrument•Personalisation • Location • Social environment • Profile and personal history
  • 26. Acquisition, processing, delivery: a new way
  • 27. Resources•http://www.citclops.eu/•http://www.coastwatch.org/•http://creekwatch.researchlabs.ibm.com/•http://mwater.co/•http://www.wasserlebnis.de/•http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/eap/fw_riv/rv_main.html•http://projectbaseline.org•http://crowd.cs.umass.edu/•http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Citizen_science•http://senseable.mit.edu/•http://research.cens.ucla.edu/aquatic/•http://www.secchidipin.org/•http://www.earthobservations.org/geo_me_201211_geo9_ec.shtml•http://www.nurp.noaa.gov/Spotlight/Observatory.htm•http://marine.rutgers.edu/mrs/LEO/LEO15.html
  • 28. Participatory environmental science Luigi Ceccaroni, Barcelona Digital Technology Centre Laia Subirats, Barcelona Digital Technology Centre Jaume Piera, CSIC Dick M.A. Schaap, MARIS

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