LINKS Slides from February 2011 - Bob Novello on Effective Presentations

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Presentation slides from Bob Novello\'s talk on how to give an effective presentation.

Presentation slides from Bob Novello\'s talk on how to give an effective presentation.

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  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.
  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.
  • Role playing allows participants to act out a behavioral role. This exercise -- done with small groups or the large group -- allows members to expand their awareness of varying points of view, and provides an experiential learning opportunity.
  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.
  • Problem solving experiences are increasingly popular in training presentations because they allow participants to gain “real world” experience that often provides direct transfer back to the job.
  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.
  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.
  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.
  • Role playing allows participants to act out a behavioral role. This exercise -- done with small groups or the large group -- allows members to expand their awareness of varying points of view, and provides an experiential learning opportunity.
  • Role playing allows participants to act out a behavioral role. This exercise -- done with small groups or the large group -- allows members to expand their awareness of varying points of view, and provides an experiential learning opportunity.
  • Role playing allows participants to act out a behavioral role. This exercise -- done with small groups or the large group -- allows members to expand their awareness of varying points of view, and provides an experiential learning opportunity.
  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.
  • We are all born with a particular tone of voice. While most people are not gifted with a radio announcer’s voice, we can learn to improve our tone of voice. The idea is have your voice sound upbeat, warm, under control, and clear.
  • We are all born with a particular tone of voice. While most people are not gifted with a radio announcer’s voice, we can learn to improve our tone of voice. The idea is have your voice sound upbeat, warm, under control, and clear.
  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.
  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.
  • A needs analysis measures what skills employees have and what they need. It indicates how to deliver the right training at the right time. The results answer the following questions on the slide.

Transcript

  • 1. The “Top Ten” Human Fears
    • 1. Speaking to a group
    • 2. Heights
    • 3. Insects and bugs
    • 4. Financial problems
    • 5. Deep water
    • 6. Sickness
    • 7. Death
    • 8. Flying
    • 9. Loneliness
    • 10. Dogs
    Source: David Wallechinsky The Book of Lists
  • 2. The Importance of Presentation Skills
    • Presentation skills are vital for anyone who presents; trainer, project manager, team lead, meeting facilitator, speaker, etc.
    • No matter which role you are assuming, this brief presentation will help you become more efficient and proficient with the skills of providing information to others.
    • You may have the best idea, the best product, or the best proposal. However, if you cannot present it in a professional manner, it may never be recognized as valuable.
    • Louis DeGeorge
  • 3. Your Learning Outcome
    • By the conclusion of today’s presentation, you will be able to apply the principles learned to prepare and deliver a brief presentation on a project management topic for a future meeting.
  • 4. Group Activity: Your Worst Presentation Experiences
    • Discuss with your group the worst presentation you have experienced. Make a list of what in particular you thought made the presentations ineffective?
    • Record your group’s results and select a spokesperson to share them with the larger group.
    • Expected Time: 8 Minutes
  • 5. My Presentation Outline
    • This brief presentation has been organized around what I believe are the 10 key success factors for developing and conducting effective presentations.
    • It is important to understand that these success factors can quickly turn into failure factors if ignored.
  • 6. Success Factor #1
    • Make a good first impression
      • Appearance
      • Promptness
      • Interest in the audience
      • Mastery of the presentation topic
      • Enthusiasm
    • You never get a second chance to make a first impression.
    • Unknown
  • 7. Success Factor #2
    • Start with a Needs Analysis
      • Purpose
      • Participants
      • Timing
      • Facility (pre-visit)
    • It takes three weeks to prepare a good impromptu speech.
    • Mark Twain
  • 8. Needs Analysis Questions
    • What is the purpose of the presentation as stated by the requester?
    • What does the requester expect the participants to be able to do as a result of the presentation?
    • Who are the participants and what are their knowledge levels?
    • How much time is allocated for the presentation?
    • Should we allow time at the end of the presentation for questions?
    • Where will the presentation be conducted? Can you schedule a pre-visit?
  • 9. Success Factor #3
    • Organize the presentation
      • Motivator/Attention-Getter
      • Outline
      • Content
        • Identify main points
        • Choose pattern for organizing
      • Summary/Closing Challenge
    • First you tell them what you are going to tell them. Then you tell them. Then you tell them what you told them.
    • Edward R. Morrow
  • 10. Attention-Getters
    • Startling fact
    • Attention-Grabbing question
    • Pertinent quote
    • Personal experience
    • Jokes (be careful)
  • 11. R.O.P.E.S. Model
    • This presentation model was jointly developed by Jim Moshinskie of Baylor University and the Vuepoint Corp.
    • Relate - The purpose of this step is to relate the presentation to the audience so they will begin to think how the topic will integrate, or mix, with other material they already know and why the information being presented is important.
    • Overview - This step has two specific functions: present the learning outcome(s) of the presentation, and give the outline of the presentation.
  • 12. R.O.P.E.S. Model (cont.)
    • Present - The information is presented to the audience by chunking the content into separate sections. The new knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) that audience needs to acquire are presented here.
    • Exercise - In this step, the audience explores, practices, and interacts with the material covered in each section of the presentation. They become active participants in the instruction.
    • Summarize - The final step is to summarize the presentation. After the audience finishes all of the sections of the presentation, a summary of the content is presented.
  • 13. Success Factor #4
    • Involve your participants
      • Share their Learning Outcome(s)
      • Incorporate discussion activities
      • Encourage them to be resources
      • Allow debate and challenge of ideas
      • Listen to and respect their opinions
    • Good presenters say interesting things. Outstanding presenters link those things to their audience.
    • Unknown
  • 14. Success Factor #5
    • Make it practical
      • Focus on “real world” situations
      • Relate to the audience’s challenges
      • Emphasize applicability
      • De-emphasize theory
    • I never teach my pupils; I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.
    • Albert Einstein
  • 15. Success Factor #6
    • Minimize lecturing
    • Telling is not teaching
    • Use appropriate delivery method(s)
      • Group discussions
      • Role play/scenario exercises
      • Problem solving exercises
    • The more you say, the less the audience remembers.
    • Unknown
  • 16. Group Discussions
    • Much more interesting than lecturing
    • Select wording which promotes discussion
    • Assign to a group to minimize individuals’ stress
    • Ensure the discussion stays related to the learning points
    • Use a “Parking Lot” approach for handling off-topic comments/questions
  • 17. Role Play/Scenario Exercises
    • Ask for volunteers, rather than making assignments
    • Select low-threat scenarios
    • Most effective when participants are more comfortable with each other (for example, work teams)
  • 18. Problem Solving Exercises
    • Define the problem and provide the needed data
    • Verify the problem can be completed within the allotted timeframe
    • When appropriate, assign to a group to minimize individuals’ stress
  • 19. Success Factor #7
    • Consistent verbal and non-verbal communication
    • You must ensure that the words you are saying and the messages your body language is conveying are consistent.
    • What your body language is projecting is equally as important as what you are saying.
    • Bob Novello
  • 20. Verbal Communication
    • Select your vocabulary for someone listening, not reading
    • Use simple, familiar words
    • Avoid acronyms
    • Be sure to provide the definitions of any terms important to the learning experience
    • Avoid reading the PowerPoint slides or flipcharts; allow time for your participants to read the information and you provide additional comments
  • 21. Verbal Communication: Voice Tone
    • What you say isn’t as important as how you say it
    • Varying your tone and using pauses help add emphasis to important points
    • Stand up tall; your posture affects breathing, which affects tone
    • Have bottled water available to stay hydrated
    • Smile; it warms up the tone of your voice
    • Your best feedback for vocal quality is listening to and analyzing your recorded voice
  • 22.
    • Why?
    • Increase participation/learning
    • Stimulate thought
    • Check comprehension
    • Arouse interest
    • Focus attention
    Verbal Communication: Ask Questions
  • 23.
    • How?
    • Your questions should be:
    • Clear and concise, covering a single issue
    • Reasonable, based on what participants are expected to know
    • Relevant and challenging, to provoke thought
    Verbal Communication: Ask Questions (cont.)
  • 24.
    • Humor is a popular way to “liven up” a presentation
    • It helps your participants relax and aligns them with your message
    • Use jokes only if:
      • They are pertinent to your message
      • You can deliver them confidently and comfortably
      • They are not offensive to anyone (gender, race, age, disability, politics)
    Verbal Communication: Use Humor
  • 25. Non-Verbal Communication
    • Non-verbal communication is the process of communication through sending and receiving visual messages (body language)
    • It is the single most powerful form of communication
    • It can cue you in to what is on another person’s mind, even more than voice or words can do
    • Hand gestures attract attention; they should be used for emphasis
    • Always maintain eye contact with your participants, avoiding talking to the projection screen, flipchart, or whiteboard
  • 26. Success Factor #8
    • Use visual aids
    • They focus attention on what is being discussed
    • They increase interest in the topic
    • They improve participants’ retention
    • The most popular visual aids are:
    • PowerPoint slides
    • Flipcharts/whiteboards
    • Video clips
    • Technology makes it possible for people to gain control over everything, except over technology.
    • John Tudor
  • 27. Retention Pyramid Towards Better Learning Audio Video Audio & Video Participative Exercises Job-Related Activities “ Real World” Experiences
  • 28.
    • Why?
    • Allows you to add emphasis to important concepts, helping to increase retention of information
    • Adds variety to your presentation
    • Makes it easier to display images, charts or graphs, possibly too complex for a flip chart.
    • Allows for last minute changes (for example, you can change the length of an activity if the class is running over the scheduled time)
    Using PowerPoint
  • 29.
    • To create and use a Microsoft PowerPoint file to support your presentation outline, you will need:
      • PowerPoint software installed on your computer
      • An LCD or DLP projector
      • A projection screen (if a light wall is not available)
    • Optionally, you may wish to add the following to your toolkit: 
    • A power strip and compatible 12 ft. extension cord
    • A laser pointer for emphasis during the discussion of a PowerPoint slide.
    Using PowerPoint: Required Tools
  • 30.
    • Learn how to effectively use PowerPoint
    • Make sure your slides match the purpose of the presentation
    • Select a slide background theme and stick to it for a consistent look and feel
    • Use the Master Slide templates to create your slides
    • Well before your presentation start time, turn off screensavers, instant messaging, email notifications, and power management
    Using PowerPoint: Preparation
  • 31.
    • Display only one major concept on each slide
    • Use bullet points or short sentences rather than longer paragraphs; helps avoid reading the slides
    • Use clip art sparingly, ensuring it complements the concept being presented on the slide
    • Use effects, transitions, animation, and sound very sparingly
    Using PowerPoint: Usage Tips
  • 32.
    • Use simple fonts such as Arial, Helvetica, or Calibri for readability
    • Select a point size of 40 or larger for titles, and 26 or larger for body text
    • Use colors that work well together, such as white on a dark background, or black on a light background
    • Limit your color combinations to two or three; bright colors like red and orange should be used for accent
    • Check the readability and visibility of your presentation with the lighting in the room in which you will present
    Using PowerPoint: Fonts
  • 33. Using Flipcharts/Whiteboards
    • Information recorded on flip charts or whiteboards focuses attention on a topic
    • It allows the presenter to easily refer back to previous information discussed
    • Print using large letters so you and the participants can read them from a distance
    • Although somewhat more expensive, use flipcart paper with light lines to avoid writing “downhill”
  • 34. Using Flipcharts/Whiteboards
    • Always check the markers before the start of the presentation and remove/replace those that are worn out
    • Be sure to separate the dry erase markers from regular chart markers, and keep the regular markers far away from the whiteboard
  • 35.
    • Video should complement the presentation, not be the presentation
    • It must be clearly pertinent to the topic being presented; explain the connection if it’s that subtle
    • Since the video clip should be brief, you should store it on your computer’s hard drive; you can have a CD or DVD in your computer’s electronic reading device as a backup
    • Most video requires audio capability, so connect speakers to your computer adequate enough to handle the volume needed for the room size
    Using Video Clips
  • 36.
    • There are three main ways to obtain video materials:
      • Purchasing off-the-shelf video designed for training presentations
      • Creating your own video media using a personal video camera
      • Hiring a professional video production company
      • The type of presentation, your media budget, the amount of available preparation time, and your comfort and skill level with video will all influence the direction.
    Using Video Clips (cont.)
  • 37. Success Factor #9
    • Avoid distractions
    • Request participants to silence their electronic devices; be sure you do it
    • Remove change and keys from pockets
    • Remove things from your hands when not using them (for example, pointers, pens, markers, etc.)
    • Movement can be used very effectively, but can be very distracting if overused
    • Check all electronics well before the start of the presentation
    • It's a visual world and people respond to visuals.
    • Joe Sacco
  • 38. Success Factor #10
    • Remember Murphy’s Law
    • Have backups!
      • Copy of PowerPoint slides to handout
      • Another version of your PowerPoint presentation using a light background, if you chose a dark background
      • Memory stick with PowerPoint slides
      • Hardware (Notebook PC, LCD projector, etc.)
      • Pre-prepared flipcharts with key points
    • Murphy’s Law
    • Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.
  • 39. Summary/Review
    • An eloquent speaker and good materials will certainly contribute to the quality of a presentation, but there are other important things that must be done to ensure success.
    • Bob Novello
    • 10 Key Success Factors
    • Make a good first impression
    • Start with a Needs Analysis
    • Organize the presentation
    • Involve your participants
    • Make it practical
    • Minimize lecturing
    • Match verbal and non-verbal communication
    • Use visual aids
    • Avoid distractions
    • Remember Murphy’s Law
  • 40. Contact Information
    • Bob Novello
    • President, Fastrack Training, Inc.
    • Web Site: www.FastrackTrainingInc.com
    • Office Phone: 512-864-7387
    • Cell Phone: 512-507-7799
    • E-mail: [email_address]