Welcome Messages Email Deiverability WhitePaper

679
-1

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
679
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Welcome Messages Email Deiverability WhitePaper

  1. 1. Research Study Achieving Maximum Results and  ROI from Your Welcome Messages GET MORE INFO Execu+ve Summary We’re no longer preparing for Y2K, tuning into Ally McBeal or watching the Dow  rpinfo@returnpath.net close above 11,000 points for the first +me. So why are marketers s+ll sending  1‐866‐362‐4577 welcome messages to email subscribers like it’s 1999? Return Path’s research  found that in too many cases, marketers are stuck in the wrong decade when it  comes to sending welcome messages that enhance subscriber experiences and  encourage response. Welcome messages are the first touch point with a new subscriber. That makes  them a prime opportunity for marketers to reinforce the benefits of their email  programs, set expecta+ons and promote brand awareness. Effec+ve welcome  messages quickly engage with their subscribers and generate sa+sfying (and  profitable) experiences. It’s easy to send a welcome message, and harder than  one would think to do it really well.  We analyzed the welcome messages of 57 top retailers to see how many were  using best prac+ces for driving response. We found that while some market‐ ers are sending messages that are op+mized to drive response, others are s+ll  sending “old school” messages that provide lible or no informa+on about what  subscribers can expect from future emails. Instead of using their welcome mes‐ sages to start bringing subscribers into the fold and showing value, 70% of the  marketers we reviewed simply thank the subscriber for signing up, without any  indica+on as to what will come next, when they might receive it and why they  should bother to read it. There were some bright spots in the data. All but a few companies have a sign‐ up form on their home page, most provide links to preference centers, and  three‐quarters sent welcome messages within 24 hours. Other findings were  less posi+ve. Most companies did not personalize their welcome messages, few  included an opt‐out link and almost none set expecta+ons for mailing frequency  or took advantage of the viral marke+ng poten+al of email.  This report discusses both the good and bad aspects of today’s subscriber wel‐ come messages, and provides examples highligh+ng both missed opportuni+es  and best prac+ces.  For more informa+on please call 1‐866‐362‐4577 or email rpinfo@returnpath.net.  © 2008 Return Path, Inc. www.returnpath.net  |  v081508
  2. 2. Your Reputa+on Holds the Key to Deliverability Case Study Introduc+on Marketers now take email seriously as a revenue‐genera+ng channel. It’s no longer treated as an agerthought, and with  good reason. According to our Fourth Annual Holiday Survey analyzing last year’s holiday shopping season, 61% of respon‐ dents said email had an impact on their purchasing decisions.  We wanted to see just how well marketers were doing at crea+ng a posi+ve experience for subscribers. Since the sub‐ scriber experience starts with the welcome message that marketers send when someone registers to receive email, that’s  where we started, as well.  Most marketers are doing certain things right:  •  91% of the companies in our study have a sign‐up form on their home page. •  About half of companies reviewed use a short form for the sign‐up process. •  60% of companies provide subscribers with links to preference centers to manage their subscrip+ons. •  74% in our study send their welcome messages immediately (less than 24 hours) following sign‐up. •  65% of companies include informa+on about how subscribers’ email addresses will be used or link to a privacy  policy in their welcome messages. While they are doing the right thing, an unsebling 35% of the companies  studied are not.  There were also numerous missed opportuni+es for marketers, from both a rela+onship and revenue standpoint. The  majority of the companies we studied did less than they could have to use the welcome message to ini+ate a rela+onship  with the subscriber:  •  25% of companies don’t bother to send welcome messages at all. •  Of the 75% that do, only 14% include a welcome offer or incen+ve to make a purchase, and only half of that 14%  men+on the welcome offer in their subject lines. •  81% of the companies do not personalize their welcome messages.  •  37% of companies in our study don’t include whitelis+ng instruc+ons for adding the company’s sending address  to one’s address book.  Almost no one set expecta+ons for future contact; only 2% of companies reviewed provide their subscribers with informa‐ +on about the frequency with which they will send emails.  Thirty percent of companies studied don’t include an opt‐out link as part of their welcome messages. Few took advantage  of the poten+al for viral marke+ng; just 12% of marketers reviewed include forward‐to‐a‐friend (FTAF) links.  Make First Impressions Count Welcome messages represent a marketers’ first impression to their subscribers. These messages must work hard to lay  the ground work for establishing “prior value,” an important driver of response. The power of prior value kicks in when  subscribers open and read your emails because they found a previous email you sent interes+ng and relevant.  Just how crucial is prior value in affec+ng subscribers’ decisions to open and read email? According to our Fourth An‐ nual Holiday Survey, 46% of respondents cited prior value as an influencing factor. While the data shows that brand and  For more informa+on please call 1‐866‐362‐4577 or email rpinfo@returnpath.net.    © 2008 Return Path, Inc. www.returnpath.net  |  v081508 Page 2 of 9
  3. 3. Your Reputa+on Holds the Key to Deliverability Case Study subject line also influence the decision to open an email, prior value is clearly a key  factor in staying relevant and driving  response.  In order to establish prior value, welcomes messages must go beyond merely saying “hello” and “thank you for signing  up.” They can play an integral part in establishing what the subscriber can expect from future emails, why subscribers  should make room in their crowded inboxes for what’s to come, and why they should open, read, click and buy. During our research we observed a number of instances where marketers neglected to use their welcome messages to  establish prior value and boost performance. Here are a few examples: Pinkberry The copy is wiby and informa+ve. It clearly states Pinkberry’s commitment to privacy and to making the opt‐out process  easy, which is a best prac+ce. However, subscribers would really benefit from a welcome coupon. We would also like to  have seen Pinkberry use the welcome message to drive “groupies” to their local Pinkberry store by including a list of store  loca+ons, showing the selec+on of the 18 various Pinkberry toppings and promo+ng their commitment to all‐natural  ingredients. For more informa+on please call 1‐866‐362‐4577 or email rpinfo@returnpath.net.    © 2008 Return Path, Inc. www.returnpath.net  |  v081508 Page 3 of 9
  4. 4. Your Reputa+on Holds the Key to Deliverability Case Study Target The design of Target’s welcome message mimics their  website, which is a best prac+ce. The content, however,  is just a “thank you.” The welcome message is a great  opportunity to introduce subscribers to Targets best  selling products, feature “deals of the week” or link to  the “what’s inside” sec+on of their site where users can  flip through seasonal catalogs. Target is a mul+‐channel  business with retail loca+ons, an ecommerce site and  direct mail catalogs. Email can be the glue that +es the  channels together. In addi+on, welcome messages are a  great +me to provide a subscriber with “must know” or  “what sets us apart” informa+on.  Jonathan Adler The Jonathan Adler website is full of bright colors, detailed images and friendly copy. This welcome message looks and  feels like it comes from another company altogether. It is a transac+onal message, rather than a chance to engage. In fact,  subscribers are instructed not to respond to the message.  For more informa+on please call 1‐866‐362‐4577 or email rpinfo@returnpath.net.    © 2008 Return Path, Inc. www.returnpath.net  |  v081508 Page 4 of 9
  5. 5. Your Reputa+on Holds the Key to Deliverability Case Study A handful of marketers used their welcome messages to draw subscribers into the fold and mo+vate them to make a pur‐ chase. Some included welcome offers, such as a discount on a first purchase or free shipping op+ons, while others used their  welcome message to state their value proposi+on and inspire subscribers to start their shopping experiences. Here are some  examples: Banana Republic  Banana Republic welcomes subscribers with an offer of free  standard shipping as part of their welcome message, along  with a “Start Shopping Now” link. Sephora This personalized welcome message from Sephora is packed  with great informa+on about why subscribers will love shop‐ ping at Sephora.com. From brand selec+on and free samples  to free gig packaging and access to beauty exper+se, Sep‐ hora makes a compelling case for why subscribers should not  only look forward to their emails, but also start browsing the  Sephora website for beauty products right away. The ben‐ efits of subscribing to their email program are clearly stated.  This welcome message also includes other best prac+ces,  such as whitelis+ng instruc+ons and a privacy policy. For more informa+on please call 1‐866‐362‐4577 or email rpinfo@returnpath.net.    © 2008 Return Path, Inc. www.returnpath.net  |  v081508 Page 5 of 9
  6. 6. Your Reputa+on Holds the Key to Deliverability Case Study The James Beard Founda+on This is a great example of a text‐only welcome message. The  frequency of the Beard Bites newsleber program is clearly  stated, as well as the benefits of signing up and the content  that each newsleber will contain. Informa+on about the foun‐ da+on is provided, as well as links to an address for subscriber  feedback, a privacy policy and a preference center. CoolSavings.com CoolSavings.com u+lizes a number of best prac+ces in their  welcome message. The message includes informa+on that out‐ lines the benefits of subscribing, whitelis+ng and bookmarking  instruc+ons and the editor’s signature (which gives the message  a personal touch). It also provides subscribers with a link to a  preference center where subscribers can choose how lible or  how much email to receive. The welcome message also provides  access to immediate savings at Pampers and Overstock, and  the footer includes useful links to the subscriber’s account, the  home page, a privacy policy and a method to opt‐out.  For more informa+on please call 1‐866‐362‐4577 or email rpinfo@returnpath.net.    © 2008 Return Path, Inc. www.returnpath.net  |  v081508 Page 6 of 9
  7. 7. Your Reputa+on Holds the Key to Deliverability Case Study Compliance Mabers There is no legal requirement for an unsubscribe link on most welcome messages; since many are automa+cally triggered and  all are in response to an ac+on taken by the subscriber (the sign up request), they could be considered transac+onal under  CAN‐SPAM. However, Return Path believes it is a best prac+ce to provide an opt‐out link.   Most subscribers have come to expect that marketers will give them the chance to opt‐out of any email communica+on,  regardless of the nature of the message. If that chance isn’t offered and they don’t want to receive any more email, they may  choose to report the offending message as spam rather than just delete it.  Despite this, 30% of the companies in our study neglected to include an unsubscribe link or opt‐out instruc+ons in their  welcome message, and 14% did not include a physical mailing address. While these marketers’ welcome messages remain in  compliance without this informa+on, we feel this is a missed opportunity to demonstrate their commitment to respec+ng the  subscriber rela+onship. Including a privacy policy is another way that marketers can show they value subscribers. It’s also a best prac+ce to provide  this informa+on at the point of address collec+on by having a privacy policy link as part of the email sign‐up form. Unfortu‐ nately 35% of companies in our study did not include privacy policy informa+on as part of their welcome messages.  Viral Marke+ng Can Start at First Contact The great majority of the companies that we studied (88%) do not include forward‐to‐a‐friend (FTAF) or viral links as part of  their welcome messages. This was consistent with the absence of typical viral/forwardable content; usually this is something  provoca+ve, clever, unique, slightly shocking, interac+ve, humorous or based on current events.  Encouraging forwarding from welcome messages can be a  challenge, as the marketer has not yet earned a high value  posi+on with the subscriber. Nevertheless, we recom‐ mend that marketers give subscribers every opportunity  to pass along their emails to friends, family and co‐work‐ ers by including viral links or forms in every email mes‐ sage. Make the link easy to find and include a one‐step  form where users can include personalized messages. J&R Music World J&R includes a “forward to a friend” link in the top right  corner of their welcome message, but it’s easy to miss or  mistake as part of the standard naviga+on as there is a lot  going on in this email layout.  One way to encourage subscribers to pass along your  messages is to men+on it in the body of the email. For  example, J&R could have included the following call to  ac+on: “Do you know a real New Yorker who loves a good  deal? Pass on the savings!” For more informa+on please call 1‐866‐362‐4577 or email rpinfo@returnpath.net.    © 2008 Return Path, Inc. www.returnpath.net  |  v081508 Page 7 of 9
  8. 8. Your Reputa+on Holds the Key to Deliverability Case Study Verizon Wireless Verizon Wireless includes a lot of useful informa+on in their  welcome message, as well as an op+on to customize future  messages by allowing the subscriber to enter their specific  phone style and calling plan. However, considering that Ve‐ rizon clearly understands the power of connec+ons in other  contexts (with their free in‐network calling), it’s surprising  that they did not include a forwarding link or encourage sub‐ scribers to forward the message to other Verizon customers  they know.  Give Subscribers Control We were pleased to see that 60% of the marketers in our  study included links to a preference center so that subscribers  could manage their seungs. These preference centers allow  subscribers to set their choice of email frequency, choose an  email format (HTML or text), update their email address and  profile informa+on, and in some cases, choose the type of  content they would like to receive (e.g. updates on specific  categories of goods, par+cular newslebers and other useful  op+ons). Sierra Trading Post Sierra Trading Post offers a mul+‐channel preference center.  Subscribers can update contact informa+on, access their  order history and manage their email preferences, and they  can also select which of the company’s eight paper catalogs  they would like to receive. Subscribers can also choose the  type of “DealFlyer” email they want to receive. They are given  informa+on about the frequency of each type of message and  a link to a privacy policy.  For more informa+on please call 1‐866‐362‐4577 or email rpinfo@returnpath.net.    © 2008 Return Path, Inc. www.returnpath.net  |  v081508 Page 8 of 9
  9. 9. Your Reputa+on Holds the Key to Deliverability Case Study Break Through With Subject Lines That Stand Out The email subject line and the “from” address are key factors in determining whether welcome messages are opened and  read. If subscribers aren’t using the preview pane func+on in their email client, then they are the only factor determining  whether a message will be opened.  En+cing, ac+onable subject lines provide the marketer with the perfect opportunity to be no+ced and stand out from the  inbox cluber (and their compe+tors). We found that too ogen, subject lines are treated as an agerthought; something to be  tacked on before pressing “send.” That’s a shame, especially when the welcome message is the marketer’s first opportunity to  build a rela+onship with the subscriber.  Return Path recommends that the welcome message subject line include a friendly gree+ng and men+on any welcome offer/ gig or relevant subscriber benefit. Standard subject line best prac+ces are also important: limit the message to 55 characters  or less and do not use all capital lebers or special characters. As with any subject line, it’s best to test in order to learn what  subject lines resonate most with subscribers. Many of the companies in our study keep their subject lines short, but not necessarily to the point.  •  Banana Republic, PetSmart and World Market all included welcome offers as part of their messages but their subject  lines only included a gree+ng (“Welcome”) and the name of the company.  •  Tagged got it right and drew subscribers into the fold with helpful advice in a subscriber‐friendly numbered format:  “Welcome! 2 Tips to get started.” •  Intermix was on the right track with a short but descrip+ve subject line: “Welcome & a Gig for You.” We suggest  spelling out the word “and” as characters ogen trigger spam filters. It’s also a best prac+ce to use the company name  to reinforce the brand message.  •  The Gap included a gree+ng, the welcome offer and the company name in their subject line, however they used 60  characters: “Thanks For Signing Up With Gap.com. Enjoy Your Special Offer.”  Laying Out the Welcome Mat in 21st Century Style Email marketers face increasing compe++on for a share of the marketplace and the minds of their subscribers. It has never  been more important to break through the cluber and consistently drive response and encourage brand loyalty. While mar‐ keters have many tools at their disposal to create relevancy and target specific subscriber segments through email, welcome  messages represent the first opportunity to do this.  An effec+ve welcome message can be the first stone in the  road towards establishing relevancy and that important concept  called “prior value.” Subscribers who find your welcome messages useful and informa+ve and know what to expect from your  email programs are more likely to open and click on your future messages. For marketers charged with improving response  and subscriber loyalty, that’s a road worth traveling. Methodology From March 28–May 16, 2007 Return Path researchers signed up for the email programs of 57 top companies represen+ng a  variety of ver+cal markets, including retailers, publishers, third‐party networks, telecommunica+ons companies, B2B market‐ ers, travel companies, social networking sites, associa+ons and sports organiza+ons. The results were analyzed by the Return  Path Strategic Services team with the goal of sharing a stronger understanding on the use of best prac+ces for op+mizing  response and engaging new subscribers. For more informa+on please call 1‐866‐362‐4577 or email rpinfo@returnpath.net.    © 2008 Return Path, Inc. www.returnpath.net  |  v081508 Page 9 of 9

×