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Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
Citations And Referencing
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Citations And Referencing

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Transcript

  • 1. Introduction to referencing
  • 2. Aim
    • To provide an understanding of what referencing is and why you should do it
  • 3. Outcomes
    • At the end of this session you will be able to:
    • Recognise when to include citations in your work
    • Identify the essentials of a complete reference
    • Cite references using the Harvard style of referencing
  • 4. What is a reference?
    • reference, n .
    •      5. a. A direction to a book, passage, etc., where certain information may be found; an indication of the author, work, page, etc., to be looked at or consulted (OED, 2008)
  • 5. What is a reference?
    • Can be a book, journal article, newspaper, website, diagram or any other source
    • How it looks depends on the referencing style you are using
  • 6. Types of referencing
    • Author-Date
      • Author and year of publication inserted in brackets after the quote or paraphrase
      • Reference list at the end of your essay arranged alphabetically by author
    • Numerical
      • Number each quote or paraphrase in the text
      • Reference list at the end of the essay with references in numerical order
  • 7. Why reference
    • To inform the reader of sources of direct quotations, data, diagrams etc
    • When paraphrasing another author’s ideas
    • When describing a theory or model associated with a particular author
    • To give weight and credibility to your argument
    • To avoid charges of plagiarism
  • 8. Plagiarism
    • “ The action or practice of taking someone else's work, idea, etc., and passing it off as one's own; literary theft”
    • Oxford English Dictionary, 2008
  • 9. You don’t have to reference…
    • Your own ideas and observations
    • Common knowledge
    • Historical overviews
    • Conclusions
  • 10. Exercise
    • Look at case scenarios given and say whether or not you would reference them
    • You can use the examples handout as a guide
  • 11. Any questions?
    • Steve McIndoe
    • [email_address]
    • 0161 275 8730

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