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Physical quantities and units pps

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Cambridge As/A level Physics …

Cambridge As/A level Physics
prepared by Ferry Tanoto
for Central International School students.

Published in: Technology, Business

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  • 1. Physical Quantities and Units
    As/A Level Physics @ferrytanoto
  • 2. Physical Quantity
    Is a feature of something which can be measured, e.g. length, weight, or time of fall.
    Every physical quantity has a numerical value (magnitude) and a unit,
    e.g. 25 m is the physical quantity of length; 25 is the magnitude and metre is the unit.
  • 3. Prefix
  • 4. Unit Conversion for Areas and Volumes
    Length
    1 mm = 10-3m
    Areas
    Squaring both sides 1 mm2 = (10-3)2 m2 = 10-6 m2
    Volume
    Cubing both sides 1 mm3 = (10-3)3 m3 = 10-9 m3
  • 5. Base Units
  • 6. Derived Units consists of some combination of the base units. The base units may be multiplied together or divided by one another, but never added or subtracted
  • 7. Derived Units
  • 8. In any equation where each term has the same base units, the equation is said to be homogeneous or ‘balanced’.
  • 9. A quantity which can be described fully by giving its magnitudeis known as a scalar quantity. A vector quantity has magnitudeand direction.
  • 10. Scalar and Vector Quantities
  • 11. Vector Representation
    One way to represent a vector is by means of an arrow. The directionof the arrow is the directionof the vector quantity. The lengthof the arrow, drawn to scale, represents its magnitude.
  • 12. Addition of Vectors
    The combined effect of two (or more) vectors is called the resultant.
    Coplanar (all in the same plane) vectors may be added (or subtracted) using a vector diagram.
    The resultant may be found using a scale drawing of the vector diagram of by calculation.
  • 13. Resolution of Vectors
    A single vector may be divided into two separate components.
    The dividing of a vector into components is known as the resolution of the vector.
    In general, a vector is resolved into two components at right-angles to each other.
  • 14. Sine rule
  • 15. Cosine rule
  • 16. Pythagoras’ Theorem
    Hypotenuse2 = Opposite2 + Adjacent2

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