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Poetry Overviewshortforup

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A slideshow I use to introduce poetry to my juniors.

A slideshow I use to introduce poetry to my juniors.

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    Poetry Overviewshortforup Poetry Overviewshortforup Presentation Transcript

    • Poetry Unit
    • Poetry -- What comes to Mind?
    • Poetry -- What comes to Mind? • Sissy crap
    • Poetry -- What comes to Mind? • Sissy crap • Touchy, feely
    • Poetry -- What comes to Mind? • Sissy crap • Touchy, feely • birds and songs
    • Poetry -- What comes to Mind? • Sissy crap • Touchy, feely • birds and songs • Shakespeare
    • Poetry -- What comes to Mind? • Sissy crap • Touchy, feely • birds and songs • Shakespeare • Rhyming
    • Poetry -- What comes to Mind? • Sissy crap • Touchy, feely • birds and songs • Shakespeare • Rhyming • Confusing
    • Poetry -- What comes to Mind? • Sissy crap • Touchy, feely • birds and songs • Shakespeare • Rhyming • Confusing • Hearts and flowers
    • Poetry is none of those
    • Poetry is none of those • Or, at least, it does not need to be.
    • Poetry is . . .
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Poetry is . . . • Experiences • Emotions • Images • Life
    • Some ground rules
    • Some ground rules • Poetry has literal and figurative meanings.
    • Some ground rules • Poetry has literal and figurative meanings. • Literal -- what it is actually about.
    • Some ground rules • Poetry has literal and figurative meanings. • Literal -- what it is actually about. • Figurative -- what it is symbolically about.
    • Example
    • Example • Shortest Poem
    • Example • Shortest Poem • Fleas, Adam had ‘em.
    • Example
    • Example • Fleas, Adam Had ‘em
    • Example • Fleas, Adam Had ‘em • Literal - A guy named Adam has fleas.
    • Example • Fleas, Adam Had ‘em • Literal - A guy named Adam has fleas. • Figurative - Adam (is a reference to the most famous Adam, the one married to Eve in the Garden of Eden), though he lives in a place of perfection, his life is not without its difficulties.
    • Some ground rules, continued
    • Some ground rules, continued • Poetry is symbolic and complex
    • Some ground rules, continued • Poetry is symbolic and complex • Uses similes and metaphors.
    • Some ground rules, continued • Poetry is symbolic and complex • Uses similes and metaphors. • Symbols
    • Some ground rules, continued • Poetry is symbolic and complex • Uses similes and metaphors. • Symbols • Allusions
    • Some ground rules, continued • Poetry is symbolic and complex • Uses similes and metaphors. • Symbols • Allusions • Personification
    • Similes
    • Similes
    • Similes • Compare two UNLIKE things using like or as.
    • Similes • Compare two UNLIKE things using like or as. • Often cliches.
    • Similes, continued
    • Similes, continued • Examples . . .
    • Similes, continued • Examples . . . • He is blind as a bat.
    • Similes, continued • Examples . . . • He is blind as a bat.
    • Similes, continued
    • Similes, continued • Examples . . .
    • Similes, continued • Examples . . . • Life is like a box of chocolates.
    • Similes, continued • Examples . . . • Life is like a box of chocolates.
    • Similes, continued
    • Similes, continued • Be original • “. . . and her fingers felt like a dead person’s, like an old peach I once found in the back of the refrigerator; the skin just slid off the meat when I picked it up.”
    • Similes, continued • Be original • “. . . and her fingers felt like a dead person’s, like an old peach I once found in the back of the refrigerator; the skin just slid off the meat when I picked it up.”
    • Similes, continued
    • Similes, continued • Be original • “You lie like a bad toupee.”
    • Similes, continued • Be original • “You lie like a bad toupee.”
    • Metaphors
    • Metaphors
    • Metaphors • Compare two UNLIKE things without using like or as.
    • Metaphors • Compare two UNLIKE things without using like or as. • Often cliches too.
    • Metaphors, continued
    • Metaphors, continued • Examples . . . • Every day is a winding road.
    • Metaphors, continued • Examples . . . • Every day is a winding road.
    • Metaphors, continued
    • Metaphors, continued
    • Metaphors, continued • Be original
    • Metaphors, continued • Be original • She is an exquisitely wrapped Christmas present . . .
    • Metaphors, continued
    • Metaphors, continued
    • Metaphors, continued • . . . full of butchered puppies.
    • Metaphors, continued Don’t worry . . . no puppies were harmed • . . . full ofin the making of this metaphor! butchered puppies.
    • Symbols
    • Symbols • A person, place, event, or object that in addition to its literal meaning suggests a more abstract, complex meaning.
    • Symbols, continued
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Symbols, continued • Examples?
    • Allusions
    • Allusions • A reference in literature to a familiar person, place, or thing.
    • Allusions, continued
    • Allusions, continued • Shrek
    • Allusions, continued • Shrek • Versarchery is an allusion to Versace.
    • Allusions, continued • Shrek • Versarchery is an allusion to Versace.
    • Allusions, continued
    • Allusions, continued • Seinfeld
    • Allusions, continued • Seinfeld • An allusion to Moby Dick.
    • Allusions, continued • Seinfeld • An allusion to Moby Dick.
    • Personification
    • Personification • Giving an inanimate object human qualities.
    • Allusions, continued
    • Allusions, continued • Often used in films.
    • Allusions, continued • Often used in films. • Often used in and art or advertisements.
    • Allusions, continued • Often used in films. • Often used in and art or advertisements.
    • Allusions, continued • Often used in films. • Often used in and art or advertisements.
    • Allusions, continued • Often used in films. • Often used in and art or advertisements.
    • Allusions, continued • Often used in films. • Often used in and art or advertisements.
    • Personification, continued
    • Personification, continued • Example from literature -
    • Personification, continued • Example from literature - • “The storm picked the house up in its teeth and shook it.”
    • Personification, continued • Example from literature - • “The storm picked the house up in its teeth and shook it.”
    • Ground rules, revisited
    • Ground rules, revisited • Poetry is symbolic and complex
    • Ground rules, revisited • Poetry is symbolic and complex • Uses similes and metaphors.
    • Ground rules, revisited • Poetry is symbolic and complex • Uses similes and metaphors. • Symbols
    • Ground rules, revisited • Poetry is symbolic and complex • Uses similes and metaphors. • Symbols • Allusions
    • Ground rules, revisited • Poetry is symbolic and complex • Uses similes and metaphors. • Symbols • Allusions • Personification
    • Similes/metaphors
    • Similes/metaphors Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Similes/metaphors Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Metaphor But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Similes/metaphors Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Metaphor But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Similes/metaphors Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Metaphor But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. Nature So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. (and its first Nothing gold can stay. green) Robert Frost
    • Similes/metaphors Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Metaphor But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. Nature So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. (and its first = Nothing gold can stay. green) Robert Frost
    • Similes/metaphors Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Metaphor But only so an hour. Gold Then leaf subsides to leaf. Nature So Eden sank to grief, (not just a So dawn goes down to day. (and its first = color Nothing gold can stay. green) but a precious metal and Robert Frost wealth)
    • Symbols
    • Symbols Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Symbols Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Symbol Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Symbols Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Symbol Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Symbols Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Symbol Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. Green So Eden sank to grief, (youth) So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Symbols Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Symbol Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. Green = So Eden sank to grief, (youth) So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Symbols Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Symbol Her early leafʼs a flower; How youth But only so an hour. quickly Then leaf subsides to leaf. Green vanishes; how = So Eden sank to grief, (youth) difficult/ So dawn goes down to day. impossible it is Nothing gold can stay. to hang on to Robert Frost youth
    • Allusions
    • Allusions Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Allusions Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Allusions Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Allusions Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Allusions Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Allusions Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Allusions Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, Eden So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Allusions Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Allusions Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, Eden = So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Allusions Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Allusions Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. The Garden of So Eden sank to grief, Eden = Eden story So dawn goes down to day. from the Bible Nothing gold can stay. (what happened?) Robert Frost
    • Personification
    • Personification Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Personification Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Personification But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Personification Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Personification But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Personification Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Personification But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nature Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Personification Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Personification But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nature = Nothing gold can stay. Robert Frost
    • Personification Nothing Gold Can Stay Natureʼs first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold. Her early leafʼs a flower; Personification But only so an hour. Then leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn goes down to day. Nature = Personified as Nothing gold can stay. a woman. Why? Robert Frost
    • Final Meaning?
    • Final Meaning? • Carpe Diem . . . Seize the day!
    • Final Meaning? • Carpe Diem . . . Seize the day! Dead Poets Society
    • Final Meaning? • Carpe Diem . . . Seize the day! Dead Poets Society
    • Final Meaning?
    • Final (youth or innocence) can • Nothing Meaning? Gold last. Make the most of it while you can.
    • Final (youth or innocence) can • Nothing Meaning? Gold last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • Final (youth or innocence) can • Nothing Meaning? Gold last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • Final (youth or innocence) can • Nothing Meaning? Gold last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • Final (youth or innocence) can • Nothing Meaning? Gold last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • Final (youth or innocence) can • Nothing Meaning? Gold last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • Final (youth or innocence) can • Nothing Meaning? Gold last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • Final (youth or innocence) can Meaning? Nothing Gold . . • Nothing Gold last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • Final (youth or innocence) can Meaning? Nothing Gold . . • Nothing Gold last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • Final (youth or.innocence) can • Nothing Meaning? Nothing Gold . . Gold . . Can Stay last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • Final (youth or.innocence) can • Nothing Meaning? Nothing Gold . . Gold . . Can Stay last. Make the most of it while you can. If you try to maintain your youth/innocence, look what happens!
    • What makes a poem a poem?
    • What makes a poem a poem? Charles Bernstein’s take on it . . .
    • What makes a poem a poem? Charles Bernstein’s take on it . . . from the“Sixty Second Lectures” podcast
    • What makes a poem a poem? Charles Bernstein’s take on it . . . from the“Sixty Second Lectures” podcast